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Full text of "Radio-TV Mirror (Jul-Dec 1952)"

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for Audio Visual Conservation 
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M » 1353 



PUiOSHEfPS 



RAjDIO-TV 
MIRROR 

JkL N. Y. radio, TV listings 



"I fell in love at first sight" says Toni Gilman • 
Young Dr. Malone • Warren Hull Strikes It Rich 








Johnny and Penny Olsen 
Two Special People 




Florence Freeman in 
Wendy Warren's adventure 





Vaughn Monroe 

and the home a song builf 



A-'V/. 






LET CAMAY TAKE YOUR SKIN 

"out of the shadows'and into 
the light of loveliness! 



u 




As this Camay bride proved-a clearer, brighter 
complexion can be yours with your First Cake of Camay I 



A GIRL who has hopes of popularity 
and romance— of a marriage pro- 
posal and all the bliss that it brings - 
may hope in vain if her complexion 
wears a mask of dullness! 

Never let your complexion be 
marred by shadows! Camay, The Soap 
of Beautiful Women, can take your 
skin "out of the shadows" and into the 
light of new loveliness. Change to reg- 
ular care— use Camay and Camay alone 
— and you'll marvel at the fresher, 
clearer complexion your very first cake 
of Camay will bring! 

For complexion or bath, there's no 



finer beauty soap than Camay. The 
mildness of Camay is so kind to your 
skin. And Camay's rich, creamy lather 
cleanses so gently. Take your skin "out 
of the shadows" and into the light of 
new loveliness with Camay, The Soap 
of Beautiful Women. 

New beauty awaits all your skin! 

The daily Camay Beauty Bath 
brings all your skin that 
"beautifully cared-for" look! 
It touches you with Camay's 
flattering fragrance. For more 
lather, more luxury, use big 
Beauty-Bath size Camay. 




MRS. CHARLES RONALD STATON, 
this lovely bride, sings Camay's praises: 
"After I changed to regular care and Camay, 
1 was amazed at the clearer, fresher look 
my skin had, It came about so quickly." 




Mm 




CJ^'fifl^ 



Camay 



Soap of Beautiful Women 



Rather be "Cut Out" or "Cut In"? 




OC'wtttck-iepewfa onlfoiL 



Sometimes a very small thing spells 
the difference between neglect and pop- 
ularity. Take Jennie's case. It's typical. 
It might be you. At almost every party 
the boys simply cut Jennie out . . . 
danced with her once, if at all, then 
snubbed and ignored her. And she, 
poor, bewildered child, never suspected 
what her trouble* was. Once she found 
out and corrected it . . . My! . . . how 
the boys came nocking! 

Why Risk It? 

Why let *halitosis (bad breath) put you 
in a bad light when Listerine Antiseptic 
is such a wonderful, extra-careful pre- 
caution against it? Listerine Antiseptic 



is the proven precaution that countless 
popular people rely on. 

Listerine Antiseptic 
Stops Bad Breath For Hours 

Simply rinse the mouth with Listerine 
Antiseptic and bad breath is stopped. 
Instantly! Delightfully! And usually for 
hours on end. Never, never omit it be- 
fore any date where you want to be at 
your best. 

You see, Listerine instantly kills mil- 
lions of the very mouth germs that cause 
the most common type of bad breath 
... the kind that begins when germs 
start tiny food particles to fermenting in 
the mouth and on the teeth. 



No Tooth Paste, No Chlorophyll Kills 
Odor Germs Like Listerine Antiseptic 

Although tooth paste is a good method of 
oral hygiene, no tooth paste ...no chloro- 
phyll. . . kills odor-producing germs with 
anything like Listerine' s germicidal effi- 
ciency. 

So, when you want that extra assurance 
about your breath, trust to Listerine 
Antiseptic, the proven, germ-killing 
method that so many popular, fastidious 
people rely on. Make it a part of your 
passport to popularity. Use it night and 
morning and before every date. Lambert 
Pharmacal Company Division of The 
Lambert Company, St. Louis 6, Missouri. 



LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC . . . stops bad breath for hours 



KILLS BAD-BREATH GERMS BETTER THAN TOOTH PASTE . . 
BETTER THAN CHLOROPHYLL 



^yCOlGATE 
DENTAL CREAM 

HAS PROVID SO COMPLETELY IT 

STOPS BAD 



#i 



SCIENTIFIC TESTS PROVE THAT IN 
7 OUT OF 10 CASES, COLGATE'S INSTANTLY STOPS 
BAD BREATH THAT ORIGINATES IN THE MOUTH! 




< Colgate's Has the Proof! 
IT CLEANS YOUR BREATH 
WHILE IT 
^CLEANS YOUR TEETH! 



For "all day" protection, brush your teeth 
right after eating with Colgate Dental 
Cream. Some toothpastes and powders 
claim to sweeten breath. But only Colgate's 
has such complete proof it stops bad breath.* 




Colgate's Has the Proof! 

COLGATE'S IS BESJ 

FOR FLAVOR! 




Colgate's wonderful wake-up flavor is the 
favorite of men, women and children from 
coast to coast. Nationwide tests of leading 
toothpastes prove that Colgate's is preferred 
for flavor over all other brands tested! 



Colgate's Has the Proof! 

THE COLGATE WAY 

STOPS TOOTH DECAY BEST! 



Yes, science has proved that brushing teeth 
right after eating with Colgate Dental 
Cream stops tooth decay best! The Colgate 
way is the most thoroughly proved and 
accepted home method of oral hygiene 
known today! 





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JULY, 1952 RADIO-TV MIRROR 

Contents 



VOL. 38, NO. 2 



Keystone Edition 



Ann Daggett, Editor Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Editorial Staff: Teresa Buxton, Betty Freedman, Helen Bolstad (Chicago) 

Hollywood: Frances Morrin 

Art Staff: Frances Maly, Joan Clarke 

Hollywood: Hymie Fink, Betty Jo Rice 



Fred R. Sammis, Editor-in-Chief 



people on the air 



what's Spinning? by Chris Wilson 6 

What's New from Coast to Coast by Jill Warren 8 

Figure for Your Bathing Suit by Victor H. Lindlahr 20 

Bob Carroll 23 

Our Precious Years by Marion Marlowe 27 

A Song from His Heart (Frank Parker) by John Ross 28 

We Laugh with Linkletter by Charles Correll 30 

All That Glitters Is Not Romance by Florence Freeman 32 

Johnny and Penny Olsen — Two Special People by Gladys Hall 34 

Prince Charming of the Airwaves (Ralph Edwards) .....by Beth Miller 36 

I'm Going to Have a Baby by Ros Twohey 40 

Young Dr. Malone 42 

Queen for a Day— and Forever! by Betty Mills 44 

I Fell in Love at First Sight (Toni Gilman) by Helen Bolstad 46 

The Home Vaughn Monroe Picked Up for a Song by Jessyca Gaver 48 

Warren Hull Strikes It Rich! ...by Martin Cohen 50 

We'll Never Walk Alone (John Daly) by Mrs. John Daly 54 

Second Honeymoon (Betty Wragge and Walter Brooke) 56 

Bringing Up Bob (Robert Young) by Fredda Dudley 58 

The Second Mrs. Burton — A Woman Wants to Be Needed 60 

Who's Who in Radio-TV 64 

"God Gave Me Another Chance" (Walter O'Keefe) by Maxine Arnold 66 

RTVM Reader Bonus: The Woman in My House by Jeff Carter 90 

your local station 

Food Comes First (WEED 16 

Capitol Quipmaster ( WOL) 19 

Nephew with a Nose for News (WIP) 22 

He Married the Landlady's Daughter (WJZ) 24 

inside radio and TV 

Information Booth • 4 

Daytime Diary 12 

Inside Radio * 73 

TV Program Highlights 75 

Cover portrait of Frank Parker and Marion Marlowe by Ozzie Sweet 



PUBLflSHED MONTHLY by Macfadden Publications, Inc., New 

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EXECUTIVE, ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES at 

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Mem her of The TRUE 



MANUSCRIPTS. DRAWINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS should Ot 
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sponsible tor loss or injury. 

FOREIGN editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, 
N. Y. Irving S. Manheimer. President; Douglas Lockhart. 
Vice President. 

Re-entered as Second Class Matter, Oct. 5, 1951, at the 
Post Office at New York, N. Y. , under the Act of March 3, 
1879. Authorized as Second Class mail, P.O. Dept., Ottawa. 
Ont., Canada. Copyright 1952 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. 
All rights reserved under Internationiil Copyright Convention. 
All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Conven- 
tion. Todos derechos reservados segun La Convenclon Pan- 
Americana de Propiedad Literaria y Artlstica. Title trademark 
registered in U. S. Patent Office. Printed in U. S. A. by Art 
Color Printing Co. 
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Information 
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Ask your questions — 
ive'll try to find the ansivers 

Love of Life 

Dear Editor: 

Can you please give me some inform- 
ation on Richard Coogan, who appears 
on Love of Life over TV? 

M. S., Nor walk, Conn. 

Richard Coogan, whom you see as Paul 
Raven on the Love of Life program, was 
born in Short Hills, New Jersey, into a 
family of ten children. As a child, Dick 
thought he would like to go into a sports 
career — but somehow he changed his 
mind and drifted into theatrical work. 
He's been in many stage plays, including 
Leslie Howard's production of "Hamlet," 
where Dick met his wife, Gay Adams. 
The Coogans have one son, Ricky, age 
two. Dick's most exciting moment in 
radio was acting with Helen Hayes in 
"Miracle in the Rain." 

Miss America 

Dear Editor: 

When was Bess Myerson, of the Big 
Payoff show, Miss America? 

R. S, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Bess was Miss America in 1945. 



Rhythm Boys 

Dear Editor : 

Who were the other two members of 
the trio Bing Crosby used to be in? 

M. L., Ardmore, Okla. 

Bing Crosby, Al Rinker and Harry 
Barris made up "The Rhythm Boys." 




Hollywood Reporter 

Dear Editor: 

Has Louella Parsons been reporting on 
Hollywood for a long time? 

V. J., Wilmington, Del. 

Louella certainly has been movie-re- 
porting for a long time. She wrote the 
world's first motion-picture column, 'way 
back in 1913. 

Serenade 

Dear Editor: 

What is the theme music I hear on 
When A Girl Marries? I think it is beau- 
tiful. 

R. 0., Chattanooga, Tenn. 

The theme music is Drigo's "Serenade." 

Cerf's Got a Family 

Dear Editor: 

Does Bennett Cerf, of What's My Line, 
have a family? 

K. H., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Bennett Cerf married the former Phyllis 
Fraser in 1940. The Cerfs have two sons. 

Kate's Maggie 

Dear Editor: 

Is it true that Kate McComb started 
her acting career quite late in life? 

S. C, Bennington, Vt. 
Yes, Kate McComb was a forty-four- 
year-old New England housewife when 
the "show business bug" bit her. 
(Continued on page 18) 




Dick Coogan 



Kate McComb 



Be gaY • ' ' 




'■V-K V^ 



Be at ease . . - 



V/ear 
what you 




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m s 










A NEW CONTEST. 



Summer is a time when portables compete with the 
sun for your attention and phonographs spin for 
patios and living rooms, with popular records get- 
ting dated and disappearing quicker than surf into the 
sand. We'll try and keep you posted on a few numbers 
which are worth collecting, and a few artists who are 
worth noting. 

Just to start with, we figured there might be someone 
in our reading audience who'd be interested in winning 
a new-type three-speed Victrola now being marketed 
by RCA-Victor. Take pen, pencil or typewriter in hand 
and complete the sentence: "L like listening to Perry 
Como because . . ." in twenty-five words or less. The 
person, who, in our opinion, gives us the most inter- 
esting sentence will win the phonograph. There's a 




This new RCA-Victor three-speed changer will be given to 
a Radio-TV Mirror reader winning our Perry Como contest. 



&®,, 



By CHRIS WILSON 




EXCITING RECORDS TO SET YOUR FEET DANCING, YOUR HEART BEATING 



center spindle -gadget on it which slips over the standard 
spindle and makes the playing of 45's a simpler matter 
than the inserting of aluminum discs, which you have 
to do on regular changers. The second most interesting 
letter will win an album of Perry Como "TV Favorites," 
which include songs most requested by Perry's TV fans. 
The songs in the album which Perry sings so well are 
Black Moonlight, If There Is Someone Lovelier Than 
You, Summertime, You'll Never Walk Alone, While 
We're Young, My Heart Stood Still, I Concentrate on 
You and Over the Rainbow. 

Johnnie Ray 

Johnnie has been in New York these past few months 
recording for Columbia and making personal appear- 
ances at the swank Copacabana and the Paramount 
Theatre. After seeing him perform at the Copacabana, 
Leland Hayward — who's known and helped more show 
business people than almost any man we know — char- 
acterized Johnnie as "one of the two greatest men in 
show business (the other being Toscanini)" when 
Leland was talking over the Tex and Jinx TV show. No 
wonder the C. G. (current generation) is mad about 
him! Unlike some of the other stars who, once up there, 
couldn't stand the worshipping public, Johnnie held open 
house in his dressing room after his Para appearances 
for all those who could crowd in. He seems to carry over 
the strong feeling he has for his own family to the larger 
family of fans he's acquired. His new album (Columbia 
CL 6199) has two songs that are in the lonesome, plead- 
ing vein of Cry — The Lady Drinks Champagne and Give 
Me Time. The rest of the songs, some old, some new, 
are worth having for listening pleasure, too. They in- 
clude Don't Blame Me, Walkin' My Baby Back Home, 
Don't Take Your Love From Me, All of Me, Out in the 
Cold Again and Coffee and Cigarettes. Johnnie's single 
platter of What's the Use is going great guns, too. 

Disc Data 

Giselle MacKenzie, that cute little star of Club 15, has 
a new one out that does justice (Continued on page 21) 



Mail before July 11 

Radio-TV Mirror 
Box 1364 

Grand Central Station 
New York, New York 

Name 

Street or Box Number 

City or Town State . 

I like listening to Perry Como because , 




Second prize in the Perry Como contest is an album 
of "TV Favorites" Perry just recorded for Victor. 




New addition to the Evelyn Winters cast: Jacqueline 
Billingsley, daughter of the famed Stork Club host. 




What's New 
Coast to Coast 



With radio and television slated to play 
vital roles in the coming Republican and 
Democratic conventions in Chicago, the 
networks will have a fantastic coverage of all 
important events. Mr. and Mrs. Average Citi- 
zen probably will have better ear-and-eye 
views of what's happening than those who 
travel to the conventions and can only watch 
one thing at a time. In addition to the fabulous 
technical facilities they have set up, the net- 
works have assigned their top news reporters, 
analysts and personalities from all over the 
country to cover every single detail of each 
convention. 

Here are just a* few of the top news names 
who will be providing aural and visual infor- 
mation on the exciting events: 

For CBS: 

Edward R. Murrow, whose reportorial ex- 
perience has ranged from the coronation of 
King George VI, through the Anschluss, 
Munich, the London blitz, the campaigns in 
North Africa and on the Continent, the election 
of the Labor government and the re-election of 
the Churchill regime in Britain, and who has 
won the Peabody Award twice for "Outstand- 
ing Reporting and Interpretation of the News." 

Eric Sevareid, CBS radio's chief Washington 
correspondent, and also a Peabody Award 
winner, who covered battlefronts on both sides 
of the globe during World War II. 



New member of the Dragnet police force: Ed Jacobs (played 
_ by Barney Phillips) teams up with Joe Friday (Jack Webb). 




New stooge (?) for Martin-Lewis antics: Marlene Dietrich finds Dean and Jerry ve-ry funny. 



Douglas Edwards, one of the youngest of the 
major newscasters, and the first newsman to 
switch from radio to television on a full-time 
basis. Edwards reported the last war from 
Europe, also the Presidential conventions in 
Philadelphia in 1948. 

Larry LeSueur, the veteran news analyst, 
who is now CBS's United Nations correspon- 
dent. When LeSueur was a staff man for the 
United Press he handled some of the biggest 
stories of the prewar period, including the 
Lindbergh case and the burning of the airship 
Hindenburg. He became a war correspondent 
for CBS in 1939, and was in on many scoops. 
He was the first correspondent to broadcast 
from the American beachhead at Normandy in 
1944; he also broadcast the first news of the 
liberation of Paris, speaking from an "under- 
ground" radio station, and was chosen official 
eye witness of the final surrender of the Ger- 
man High Command. LeSueur won the Pea- 
body Award in 1949 for his radio coverage of 
the United Nations. 

Charles Collingwood, the CBS White House 
correspondent. He was a Rhodes scholar, a 
United Press man in London, and in 1941 be- 
came a war correspondent. Since the war, he 
has had various top assignments in the United 
States and has been assigned to the White 
House since 1949. Mrs. Collingwood is the 
former movie star, Louise Allbritton, who gave 
up her career when (Continued on page 10) 




New Presidential candidate: Oliver Dragon — supported by 
Kukla and Frar Allison — backed by writer Burr Tillstrom. R 



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Address- 
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lier husband was transferred to the capi- 
tal city. • 

Robert Trout, the veteran newscaster. 
Trout really knows his way around politi- 
cal conventions, having covered the ones 
in 1936, 1940 and 1944. He is famed for 
his great ability at ad-lib reporting of the 
on-the-spot news, and is called the "Iron 
Man of Radio" because he has never been 
known to miss a cue. Trout covered the 
on-site atomic explosion test a few weeks 
ago in Nevada. 

Lowell Thomas, who certainly needs no 
introduction to news listeners. Thomas, 
who has been on the air for twenty-one 
years, is famous as a lecturer, world trav- 
eler, movie newsreel commentator, and 
author. 

Also representing CBS will be Walter 
Cronkite, former chief correspondent for 
the United Press in Moscow; news analysts 
Allan Jackson and Don Hollenbeck; Ed- 
ward P. Morgan, David Schoenbrun, Bill 
Downs — in addition to crack regional re- 
porters from all over the country. 

For Mutual: 

Cecil Brown, noted radio war corre- 
spondent and commentator. A former re- 
porter, Brown began broadcasting in 1937 
and, ever since, has managed to be on the 
scene when world-famous events were 
happening. In World War II, Brown was 
on board the Repulse when it was sunk 
by Japanese torpedoes; his story, reported 
by air from Singapore, made journalistic 
history. 

H. R. Baukhage, one of the deans of 
newsmen in Washington, who for thirty 
years has covered Capital affairs for news- 
papers and radio. One of the most mem- 
orable of his Baukhage Talking broadcasts 
was on December 7, 1941, when he was the 
first one to broadcast the war news direct 
from the White House. 

Bill Cunningham, a newsman long ex- 
perienced in national politics. He is a 
true convention veteran, having covered 
them consistently since 1928. 

Fulton Lewis, Jr., Mutual's ace reporter 
in Washington. A native of the capital 
city, he has been broadcasting news from 
there for many years and also writes a 
daily syndicated column. 

William Hillman, Mutual's White House 
correspondent, famous in the news field, 
and well known as a confidant of govern- 
ment officials, including President Truman 
himself. Hillrnan's book, Mr. President, is 
on the best-seller list. 

Also on hand for Mutual will be Sam 
Hayes, popular commentator from the Pa- 
cific Coast; Robert Hurleigh, Mutual's Chi- 
cago news chief; Everett Holies, of the 
Reporters' Roundup program; Cedric Fos- 
ter, Frank Singiser, Leslie Nichols, Frank 
Edwards, Les Higbie. 

For NBC: 

Bill Henry, popular newscaster, a vet- 
eran newspaper man, who did his first 
news broadcast back in 1923, in the days of 
the crystal set. He was a famous war 
correspondent and is columnist and head 
of the Washington Bureau for the Los 
Angeles Times. Henry will voice the run- 
ning commentary on the political conven- 
tions and has been named chairman of the 
broadcasting arrangements, as he was in 
1948. 

H. V. Kaltenborn, who just two months 
ago celebrated his thirtieth anniversary in 
broadcasting. Considered the dean of all 
radio commentators, Kaltenborn is also 
one of the most colorful. He is still being 
kidded about his famous "wrong guess" on 
election night in 1948, but he says he erred 
in good company., 

John Cameron Swayze, popular tele- 
vision personality, an ex-newspaperman 
who switched to radio in 1940. He was one 



of the first newscasters to go into TV and 
has been one of the most successful in the 
medium. 

W. W. Chaplin, George Hicks and Leon 
Pearson, each distinguished reporters in 
their own right, who have been working as 
the "primaries team," traveling around the 
country, crossing paths with the candi- 
dates, so they'll have first-hand reports for 
listeners at convention time. 

Ben Grauer, long-time special events 
reporter for NBC, who has described 
everything from Presidential inaugura- 
tions to the total eclipse of the sun in 
Brazil. This convention will be the fourth 
Grauer has covered for NBC. 

Dave Garroway, the unique radio and 
television personality, who will lend his 
relaxed delivery to the proceedings. 

Elmo Roper, noted public -opinion poll- 
ster, who has been doing a series of radio 
broadcasts analyzing what is important to 
voters this election year. 

Other well-known NBC news figures 
will include Morgan Beatty, Richard Hark- 
ness, and David Brinkley, of the Wash- 
ington staff; Leif Eid, Ned Brooks, Ray 
Henle, Albert Warner, Clifton Utley, Alex 
Dreier, Bob Letts, Elmer Peterson. 

The Meet The Press show will interview 
important figures on the convention floor 
and the American Forum of the Air and 
American Youth Forum programs will be 
done from Chicago during the convention 
periods. 

For ABC: 

John Daly, distinguished commentator 
and ex-foreign correspondent, who has 
covered every convention since 1940, ex- 
cept during the war in 1944. 

Martin Agronsky, also a former war 
correspondent, now ABC's Washington 
man. Agronsky covered the last prewar 
meeting of the League of Nations at Ge- 
neva, was also on hand in New York City 
when the United Nations Security Council 
began deliberations in 1946. 

Elmer Davis, outstanding Washington 
news analyst. Davis has won the coveted 
Peabody Award three times for his news 
commentaries. 

Walter Kiernan, whose column, "One 
Man's Opinion," is widely syndicated. 
Kiernan is known for his keen and incisive 
wit on the air, can certainly be counted 
on to catch the humorous side of conven- 
tion happenings. 

Pauline Frederick, who is the only 
woman network news analyst and diplo- 
matic correspondent on the air. 

ABC's convention roster will also in- 
clude Drew Pearson, famous Washington 
columnist and radio commentator; Ted 
Malone, human interest reporter; George 
Sokolsky, noted columnist and syndicate 
writer; Quincy Howe, Mary Margaret Mc- 
Bride, Taylor Grant, Paul Harvey, others. 



Now that many movie stars are desert- 
ing films for television, Lloyd Nolan has 
done the reverse and given up his radio 
and video jobs as Martin Kane, Private 
Eye. Nolan decided to return to Holly- 
wood and his picture career, so Lee Tracy 
has taken over as the new Martin Kane. 

The Ralph Edwards radio show is back 
on the air on Saturday nights over NBC, 
with all its gags, gimmicks, audience-par- 
ticipation stunts and nationwide contests. 
Edwards' daytime television show is now 
off the air for the summer, but will return 
again in the fall. 

Patsy Lee, who has been the vocalist on 
Breakfast Club since 1947, resigned from 
the Don McNeill radio family to become 
a bride. Patsy was married to Rick Lif- 
vendahl, of the United States Naval In- 
telligence Department, on May 24, in her 



home town, Oakland, California. Patsy 
became the fifth songstress to leave the 
Breakfast Club for marriage during the 
program's nineteen-year broadcasting his- 
tory—Annette King (1936-39), Evelyn 
Lynne (1939-41), Nancy Martin (1939-46), 
and Marion Mann (1941-46). 

Even though her daddy probably won't 
have the same job next year, Margaret 
Truman is all set, at least as far as radio 
and television are concerned. She re- 
cently renewed her contract with NBC 
for guest appearances during the 1952-53 
season. She is signed for a minimum of 
nine spots on major shows and will re- 
ceive from $2500 to $4000 a performance, 
depending on the budget for each show. 

Remember the old radio program, Ladies 
Be Seated? Well, it's back on the air in 
the afternoons, Monday through Friday, 
over ABC. Singer Jimmy Blaine is the 
new master of ceremonies, and for musi- 
cal company he has the Buddy Weed trio 
and vocalist Gloria Parker. 

This 'n'That: 

Jacqueline Billingsley, daughter of Sher- 
man Billingsley, host of New York's 
famous Stork Club, has joined the cast of 
The Strange Romance of Evelyn Winters. 
She is playing the part of Carla Perry, 
assistant stage manager of the play- 
within-a-play in which Evelyn is the 
understudy. . . . Comedian Allan Young 
and his wife are expecting a visit from the 
stork in September. . . . Kay Armen says 
she is radio's most disappointed girl singer. 
After traveling all the way to Hollywood 
to make a guest appearance on Mario 
Lanza's show, Kay — who had been an 
ardent fan of his — never even got to meet 
him. She did her song with the orchestra 
and, through the magic of tape recording, 
"'chatted" with Lanza, though he wasn't 
there. Later, from cue sheets, Lanza filled 
in his portion of the broadcast. The two 
tape recordings were fused and the show 
went on the air. . . . Kay has yet to meet 
Mr. L. . . . Incidentally, a few weeks ago 
Lanza bet on a horse called Caruso II 
and the horse won, so he got interested in 
horses and thought maybe he'd like to 
own one of his own He began making 
inquiries as to price, upkeep, etc., wound 
up buying a pony — which Betty Hutton's 
children had outgrown — and presented it 
to his three-year-old daughter, Colleen. 

Charles Boyer. Rosalind Russell, Dick 
Powell and Joel McCrea have signed with 
Official Films to star in a series of half- 
hour television movies to be produced in 
Hollywood. The series ■will be called Four 
Star Playhouse, with the stars rotating 
each week in original screen plays, and the 
first two shows have already been shot. 
Official Films is a company which will pro- 
duce and distribute TV films exclusively, 
and among the prominent stockholders are 
such radio personalities as Jack Benny, 
Dinah Shore, Jo Stafford and Frank 
Sinatra. 

Nat Polen, who plays Michael Dalton in 
The Second Mrs. Burton (see, page 61), is 
also a director in his spare time. He has 
organized a children's theatre in Hicks- 
ville, Long Island, where he lives, and he 
spends every Saturday working with a 
hundred children between the ages of 
seven and fourteen, teaching them dra- 
matics. 

Joel Kupperman, the oldest member of 
the radio panel of the Quiz Kids, is now 
fifteen years old and will "graduate" from 
the program shortly, the age limit on the 
show being sixteen. Joel joined the 
"junior geniuses" when he was five, and 
through the years he has received a one- 
hundred-dollar bond each time he ap- 
peared. His parents have never touched 
(Continued on page 25) 



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Da ytime 
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AGAINST THE STORM Just as she 
was about to put behind her the unsuccess- 
ful marriage with Hal Thomas and start 
a new chapter of her life, Siri was stunned 
by Hal's death in an accident. Her un- 
reasonable feeling of guilt toward Hal is 
strengthened by the furious accusations of 
Hal's mother, and Siri finds herself more 
bound to Hal in death than she had been 
while he was alive. How will these events 
affect Julian Browning and his bride? 
M-F, 10:45 A.M. EDT, ABC. 

AUWT JEXNY How much chance is 
there for a romance between a girl of 
twenty-one and a man in his forties? Meg 
Saunders was convinced that she loved her 
boss, Steven Lewis, enough to compensate 
for the difference in their ages — enough to 
give up her boy friend, Bob Friesen. In her 
recent story about Meg, Aunt Jenny told 
what ha; pened when Steven Lewis him- 
self finally brought the situation to a 
climax. M-F, 12:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

BACKSTAGE WIFE Neither Mary 
Noble nor her actor-husband Larry realize 
that their estrangement is the product of 
a well-laid plan by which wealthy Rupert 
Barlow hopes to win Mary for himself. 
With Mary in the Virgin Islands ready to 
institute divorce proceedings, Larry is 
stunned to hear from his old friend, Tom 
Bryson, that if there is no reconciliation 
he, Tom, will ask Mary to marry him. Is 
Tom serious — or has he a plan of his own? 
M-F, 4 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

BEG SISTER Ruth Wayne can hardly be- 
lieve that her long, bitter battle with mil- 
lionaire Millard Parker has finally ended. 
Parker's death causes many changes in the 
lives of Ruth's friends in Glen Falls, and 
strongly affects her own future and that of 
her husband, Dr. John Wayne. But it is a 
long time before she gets over her grief at 
the almost simultaneous death of Selena, 
who was once Parker's wife. M-F, 1 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

TUB BRIGHTER BAY For the first 
time in her life, Althea Dennis indulges in 
some serious self-examination when her 




four-year-old daughter Spring returns from 
New York. Spoiled and over-sure of her- 
self, Spring is' a small copy of what Al- 
thea knows herself to be. Will she continue 
to use her invalidism as a weapon to hold 
Larry Race, in spite of what she cannot 
help knowing about Larry and his broth- 
er's widow Vicki? M-F, 2:45 P.M. EDT, 
CBS. 

THE DOCTOR'S WIFE Dr. Dan Palm- 
er is in the strange position of causing un- 
happiness to one of the people he is most 
fond of — his young brother Ned. Dan's 
success has given Ned such an inferiority 
complex that he can't get started on a 
career of his own. Whenever Dan tries to 
help, it somehow results in more trouble, 
until Julie, Dan's capable young wife, 
takes a hand. Have Julie's tactful arrange- 
ments really started Ned on his way? M-F, 
5:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

FKOiVT PAGE FARREhJL When re- 
porter David Farrell is assigned to cover 
The Family Secret Murder Case, he finds 
that the wealthy Winship family has its 
secrets by the dozen. The murder of an 
attractive young maid is the starting gun 
for a series of astonishing revelations about 
Winship family affairs. David and his wife 
Sally, helping the police, are confused by 
the number of suspects — but not too con- 
fused to arrive at the truth. M-F, 5:15 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 

GUIBING LIGHT Young Cathy Rob- 
erts, bitter and confused over her father's 
marriage to Meta White, is determined to 
escape from a home she can no longer be 
happy in. Can Meta feel herself partly to 
blame for the tragic mistake Cathy makes 
— a mistake that frighteningly parallels the 
one Meta herself made when she was a 
young, romantic girl? And now that 
Cathy, through her own experience, begins 
to understand Meta better — is it too late? 
M-F, 1:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

HILLTOP HOUSE Julie Paterno, super- 
visor of Hilltop House, faces a problem 
she has not encountered before in twelve- 
year-old Marcia, adopted daughter of her 



friend Reed Nixon. Shrewd and devious 
far beyond her age, Marcia engages in an 
active campaign to discredit and persecute 
Julie, whom she hates. Meanwhile. Julie 
shares the emotional strain of Jeff Browning 
as they wait for his wife Nina to regain her 
mental balance. M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

JUST PLAiM BILL The accidental 
death of Leslie Palmer proves what Bill 
Davidson suspected — that Palmer was 
guilty of the stabbing of Barbara Moore's 
mother. Palmer's death has led to a dra- 
matic situation involving Hannah Brooks 
and her strange young daughter, Amy, with 
Sidney Chadwick, of the wealthy Chadwick 
family. Bill, puzzled by the contact be- 
tween the humble Brookses and the power- 
ful Chadwicks, wonders just what is be- 
hind it. M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

LIFE CAM BE BEAUTIFUL Chichi 
and Papa David have many times observed 
that money has a way of complicating any 
human situation. Is the weak Paul Van- 
denbush going to become dangerous as he 
sees the possibility of losing his right to 
the fortune of his aunt, the wealthy Vic- 
toria Vandenbush? Is Chichi being too 
romantic and naive when she decides that 
Martin Walker is telling the truth about 
himself? M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

LOME JOURMEY Can a woman like 
Sidney live a lie — convince a man she loves 
him when in reality she loves another 
man? Motivated by loyalty, Sidney tries 
hard to make a success of her life with 
Lansing MacKenzie, but Lansing, unde- 
ceived, bows out, asking her to divorce 
him. Does Lansing's renunciation free Sid- 
ney for happiness with Wolf Bennet, or is 
it, perhaps, not going to be quite that 
simple? M-F, 11 P.M. EDT, ABC. 

LOREMZO JOMES When wealthy Mrs. 
Carmichael asks Lorenzo to help remove a 
picture cemented to the wall of the Car- 
michael residence, Lorenzo walks into one 
of his most exciting adventures. There is 
an old legend about buried treasure in con- 
nection with the Carmichaels, and when 
Lorenzo stumbles on a secret passageway 
he and Mrs. Carmichael are certain they 
are on the verge of a great discovery. But — 
are they? M-F, 5:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

MA PEitKINS Ma Perkins is shocked 
and dismayed when Mathilda Pendleton 
announces her intention of divorcing bank- 
er Augustus Pendleton because of a 
woman named Mrs. McKenzie. Pity for all 
the Pendletons. including the daughter, 
Gladys, leads Ma to try to help, and she 
learns that Mrs. McKenzie is far from be- 
ing the kind of "other woman" Mathilda 
has accused her of being. Can Mathilda 
be made to understand what she has done 
to her own marriage? M-F, 1:15 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

MARY MARLIN As Mary Marlin's ex- 
perience in marriage grows and deepens, 
she comes to appreciate more than most 
women the true meaning of the phrase: 
for better, for worse. For as the wife of 



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Daytime Diary 



politician Joe Marlin, Mary's marriage is 
subject not only to all the ordinary strains 
of living but to certain special trials whose 
results have significance for others as well 
as for Mary and Joe themselves. How will 
she help Joe against his enemies? M-F, 
3:15 P.M. EDT, ABC. 

OUR GAL SUNDAY Why has famous 
actress Rosalind West given up her Career 
and retired to Fairbrooke with her crippled 
husband, Alec, and their attractive daugh- 
ter, Audrey? Sunday Brinthrope and her 
husband, Lord Henry, sense something pe- 
culiar about the West family's relation- 
ships with each other. How was Alec really 
crippled? What is the hidden tension un- 
der which Audrey is obviously suffering? 
M-F, 12:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

PEPPER YOUNG'S FAMILY Wealthy 
recluse Ellen Springer has long lived a 
quiet, orderly life in Elmdale, and the last 
thing Pepper or anyone else expected was 
to find Miss Springer at the very storm 
center of the most peculiar events that 
have stirred up the town in many months. 
What will happen to Sadie, Miss Springer's 
maid? And how is industrialist Dwight 
Davenport connected with Miss Springer, 
who as far as is known has no past at all? 
M-F, 3:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

PERRY MASON Determined to save 
his client, May Grant, from paying for a 
crime she did not commit, Perry Mason 
risks a daring gesture — and becomes a 
fugitive from the law himself. The police 
aren't the only pursuers Perry has to evade 
as he tracks down the evasive bit of evi- 
dence that will prove his case. Anna B. 
Hurley is also on his trail — the ingenious, 
relentless woman who knows all the an- 
swers Perry wants, and is determined to 
keep him from learning them. M-F, 2:15 
P.M. EDT, CBS. 

ni4.ni TO UAPPINESS The plot to 
ruin Governor Miles Nelson at last takes 
shape when he is forced to answer certain 
definite charges reflecting on his conduct 
of his duties. Carolyn, in a desperate 
gamble to prove Miles innocent, under- 
takes a masquerade at the state reforma- 
tory, hoping to collect evidence to show 
Neil Prescott's complicity in the false ac- 
cusation against Miles. Will Carolyn be 
discovered? M-F, 3:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

ROAD OF LIFE In forcing the resigna- 
tion of Dr. Jim Brent from Wheelcock 
Hospital, Conrad Overton and Gordon 
Fuller may have brought about not the 
victory they are congratulating themselves 
on, but the eventual defeat of their entire 
malevolent plan. For when Jim's friend, 
Frank Dana, becomes head of the Jericho 
County Commission, he appoints Jim coun- 
ty medical examiner. Jim's new power 
means trouble for his enemies. M-F, 3:15 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 



ROSEMARY Whatever happens to Bill 
and Rosemary Roberts as a result of his 
trial for the murder of Blanche Weatherby, 
certainly the lives of all who know them 
will be permanently affected. Although 
Rosemary's stepfather, Dr. Jim Cotter, is 
happy with his new hospital in Spring- 
dale, neither he nor Rosemary's mother 
will ever forget that for a time the friendly 
town turned against them because of Bill. 
And for Blanche's parents, the future is 
unforeseeable, M-F, 11 :45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

SECOND MRS. RURTON Terry's 
worst fears for the health of her husband, 
Stan, are finally justified when Stan's col- 
lapse ends in his paralysis. Desperate, 
Terry surveys the situation, and although 
she is a courageous woman she wonders 
just how she can plan a future which will 
keep her family independent of Stan's 
mother, the demanding and possessive 
woman who has almost ruined her mar- 
riage already. Can Terry find a way of 
supporting herself, Brad, Wendy . . . and 
Stan? M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

STELLA DALLAS Once again Stella's 
neignbor, the wealthy, eccentric Jared 
Stone, draws Stella's attention when she 
becomes interested in his secretary, Emily 
Calvert. Emily, a former schoolmate of 
Stella's daughter Laurel, has fallen in love 
with her employer. But the perverse Jared 
seems to enjoy treating Emily meanly. 
Does he know her feeling toward him? 
What can Stella do to help her young 
friend? M-F, 4:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

STRANGE ROMANCE OF EVELYN 
WINTERS The feud between playwright 
Gary Bennett and producer Nigel Forrest is 
finally made clear to Gary's ward, Evelyn, 
when she learns that the mysterious wo- 
man at the bottom of it is Nigel's sister, 
who was once in love with Gary. Nigel 
claims that Gary jilted his sister, but told 
Gary that she was dead. What effect will 
her reappearance in Gary's life have on 
Evelyn, who is in love with her guardian? 
M-F, 3:45 P.M. EDT, ABC. 

TRE ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT 

The wealthy parents of Barclay Bailey are 
waging real war against Hollywood de- 
signer Helen Trent, determined to prevent 
Barclay from making plans to marry her. 
The Baileys may succeed in destroying 
more than Helen's friendship with Barclay, 
for they are planting so many damaging 
stories about her in so many places that 
her reputation mav be irrevocably ruined. 
M-F, 12:30 P.M. EDT. 

THIS MS NORA DRAKE The tragic, 
sudden death of her friend Peg Martinson 
is a great shock to Nora, who cannot help 
feeling that if she had tried just a little 
harder to understand Peg the accident that 
killed her might never have occurred ... if 
it was an accident. But gradually as the 



emotional strain lessens, Nora realizes that 
Peg's death in a way marked the end of 
a long chapter in her own life. What is 
ahead for Nora? M-F, 2:30 P.M. EDT, 
CBS. 

WENDY WARREN Although Wendy 
has been a successful newspaperwoman 
and radio commentator, she never envi- 
sioned for herself a Hollywood career. But 
the young producer working on the docu- 
mentary Wendy contracted to make be- 
comes so enthusiastic that to her own 
surprise Wendy finds it not so difficult to 
keep her mind off her emotional troubles — 
the troubles engendered by dynamic actress 
Maggie Fallon, who has fallen in love with 
Mark Douglas. Wendy's fiance. M-F, 12 
Noon EDT. CBS. 

WUEN A GERE MARRIES Claire 
O'Brien was determined from the begin- 
ning to break up the marriage of Joan and 
Harry Davis, and Harry is only now be- 
ginning to see how well she played her 
cards. Will his career and his marriage be 
devastated because of Claire's passion for 
him? How can Joan ever rebuild her own 
happiness as she faces the facts of Harry's 
involvement with the predatory Claire? 
M-F, 11:15 A.M. EDT, ABC. 

WOMAN IN MY HOUSE When young 
Sandy Carter eloped with Dave Elliott, her 
family immediately set out to help the two 
young people get started on married life. 
But Sandy and Dave ran into some prob- 
lems with which no outsider could help, 
and the infant marriage was on shaky 
ground when Dave was sent to fight in 
Korea. The tragic news of his death has 
affected Sandy in a strange way. Does she 
feel guilty toward Dave? Or is it some- 
thing else? M-F, 4:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

YOUNG DR. M ALONE When Mary 
Browne finally agreed to marry Ernest Hor- 
ton, Dr. Jerry Malone thought he was see- 
ing two young people off to a happy future. 
But when Ernest begins to work off his 
frustrations as a writer on Mary, the in- 
fant marriage runs into serious difficulties. 
Meanwhile, in Three Oaks, Anne Malone 
is concerned as business troubles bring out 
an unexpected and frightening facet in 
Sam Williams' personality. M-F, 1:30 
P.M. EDT. CBS. 

YOUNG WMDOER DROWN Chivalry 
halts the fight of Dr. Anthony Loring to 
free himself from his long-estranged wife, 
Ruth, when this woman, who has suddenly 
reappeared to disrupt his life, suffers a 
mental breakdown. Ellen Brown, who 
hopes to marry Anthony when it can be 
proved that his marriage to Ruth was an- 
nulled a long time ago. realizes that Ruth's 
illness has held up her own happiness for 
what might be a long time. Will Ellen be 
willing to wait for Anthony? M-F, 4:30 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 



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Swapping recipes and exchanging 
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Three million people call her mother, and 
Heloise Parker Broeg has a heart big enough 
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audience right into her friendly kitchen via 
WEEI, Boston, every morning except Sunday. 

Food Fair has become a must-listen in Boston 
ever since Mother Parker started the show 
twelve years ago. Her listeners know that her 
advice on home problems, the food tips she gives 
and the products she sells, are completely re- 
liable. They should be — because Heloise got her 
basic training in her grandmother's farm kitchen 
back in Crawford County, Illinois, then turned 
her practical experience into a successful chain 
of bakeries and a biscuit-mix factory. She got 
along for a spell as a housewife on a strict 
budget, too. 

Home for Mother Parker is a warm, sunny 
house near Boston with a garden inside and out. 
The inside garden is really the leafy design 
which dominates drapery, slip-covers, and wall 
paper. Leaves have become the symbol of good 
living for the Illinois farm girl. "The magnolia, 
huckleberry and rhododendron leaves in my 
house," explains Mother Parker, "give me a feel- 
ing that I, too, am a part of nature, that each new 
day offers me the chance to make a fresh start." 



If you want to borrow a cook-book, drop in at 
Mother Parker's — she has collected more than 
one thousand, dating back to 1663. Knitting, 
sewing, and cookery are her favorite hobbies.' 
She feels that mothers would do well to spend 
more time teaching their daughters to do these 
things, as part of a happy, active life. 

Although cooking and home economics have 
always been her first love, Mother Parker also 
had a varied career as a school teacher, telephone 
operator, orange packer and cost accountant 
before her travels led her to Boston and Food 
Fair. She edited a magazine and was a news- 
paper food columnist, too. 

Her loyal listeners are not alone in recognizing 
the healthy influence Mother Parker has brought 
to New England homes. She has won numerous 
awards from food associations and home eco- 
nomic groups. Among them— the Life Line of 
America Trophy awarded to her in 1948 and 1950, 
and a citation from New England's grocery in- 
dustry for "distinguished public service to the 
food industry of New England." 

But, despite the honors won and the reputation 
earned, Mother Parker retains the warm, human 
qualities which endear her to WEEI audiences. 
Stacks of mail attest to the fact that they have 
learned to believe in her and trust her judgment. 



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Information Booth 

(Continued) 
Mystery Gal 

Dear Editor: 

Can you tell me who it is Jimmy Durante 
refers to when he says, "Good night, Mrs. 
Calabash, wherever you are?" 

P. M., Wellesley, Mass. 

People are always asking Jimmy about 
Mrs. Calabash, but his reply is: "Ain't a 
fella got a right to have any secrets?" It 
looks like Mrs. Calabash will just have to 
remain his mystery woman. 



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Dear Editor: 

Who is the native of Boston referred to 
as "Pop" of the Boston Pops Orchestra? 

A. R., East Liverpool, Ohio 

Maestro Arthur Fiedler is the famed 
"Pop" of the Boston Pops. The conductor 
was born in Boston into a family of musi- 
cians. His father was a violinist for the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, his grand- 
father was a violinist in Europe, and bis 
three sisters are all musicians. He has 
been conducting the Pops since 1930. 

Foreign Correspondent 

Dear Editor: 

Is Jerome Thor, star of Foreign Intrigue, 
married, and does he have any children? 
Also, where ivas he bom? 

L. B., White Plains, N. Y. 

Jerome Thor, the foreign correspondent 
in Foreign Intrigue, is married to his 
leading lady. Sydna Scott. The Thors have 
no children. Jerome was born in Brooklvn, 
New York. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— If there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
Radio-TV Mirror, 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y. We'll answer, if we can, 
provided your question is of general in- 
terest. Answers will appear in this colun\n 
— but, be sure to attach this box to your 
letter, and specify whether your question 
concerns radio or TV. 




Jerome Thor 



Wapita 
quipmaster 





What with Hopalong Cassidy standing by and pop 
Mike rigged up in a fancy cowboy suit, Mike, Jr. 
and Bob are the happiest kids in Washington, D. C. 



WOL's Mike Hunnicutt and guest star — Mrs. Mike 



Mike hunnicutt's a natural "morning man." Soon 
as Washington station WOL realized it, they 
asked him to share this rare quality with listeners 
on a 6-9:30 A.M. program. The result: Hunnicutt's 
Hassle, which starts District of Columbia folks off 
with a smile. 

Give Mike a rinky-dink piano, a song to sing, his 
wife Polly by his side singing and joshing along with 
him — and you've got entertainment which would 
make anybody glad to be awake. Mike doesn't re- 
serve his earthy wit and musical talent for the times 
when he's paid to give out, though. His two boys, 
Michael, Jr., eleven, and Robert, six, get the benefit 
of Mike at his funniest and most relaxed — at home. 
The boys, by the way, are frequent guests on the 
program. As they put it, "We've been helping the 
ol' man out with the show for quite a while now." 
That's putting it mildly — they've been doing it ever 
since they could talk. And, of his two sons, Mike 
raves, "Those boys are the greatest things since 
Whitney invented the cotton gin." 

In radio (and more recently TV) for nineteen 
years, Mike and Polly were one of the first husband- 
and-wife teams back when radio was just a baby. 
Washingtonians heard them singing and plunking 
the keys in 1933, and liked the combine so much, 
the two were booked into a four-year morning spot. 



But, when little Mike was born. Polly decided to 
bow out of active radio work. Meanwhile, other 
Washington stations were bidding for big Mike's 
talent. Any guy who could wake folks up and make 
them happy at the same time — especially in taut- 
nerved D.C. — was worth hiring. In 1946, Mike went 
to work for WOL. He and organist Charlie Keaton 
joined forces in the capital's Neptune restaurant. 
Everybody who was anybody dropped in for Brunch 
with Mike. 

Early in 1951, Mike got the urge to try his luck in 
television and journeyed to Cincinnati, where he 
did a stint on WCPO. But the pianist-singer's heart 
was in Washington. After six months, he just 
couldn't squelch his homesickness any longer. So 
back he went to WOL, where — in addition to his 
morning show — he also emcees The Federal Quiz 
three nights a week. 

Gusti, a local restaurateur, recently summed up 
the reason for Mike's appeal: "Somehow, if his 
listeners wake up with ice packs where their heads 
should be, all they do is tune in Mike — he fixes 'em 
up in a jiffy. What I mean is, he's always with the 
audience." Mike is a friendly, human person — and 
his personality reaches across the airwaves into 
Washington homes, where as in his own home, Mike 
is considered a real pal. 



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Vacation days are here! That 
means thin, light clothes, back- 
less and perhaps strapless 
dresses, slacks and shorts, and finally 
the all -revealing swim suit. The 
woman who has been hiding excess 
fat behind fuller-cut, darker clothes 
is in for trouble. 

Appearance isn't the only reason 
for being concerned with summer 
overweight. Everyone wants to take 
advantage of the summer, season to 
get out more and play. You may 
want to play a game of tennis, golf, 
take walks along a beach, or hike, 
or go on a picnic. If you are over- 
weight, you will let your husband or 
friend go it alone. If you try to keep 
up with slender, active members of 
the family, your heart will beat like 
a trip-hammer, and you'll all but 
hear the siren of an ambulance. 
Now's the time to think of your ap- 
pearance and physical condition, for 
usually a slender figure goes hand 
in hand with good health. 

It's not too late to get. in shape for 
summer. The torrid sun of mid- 
summer is . still weeks away. It's 
possible to lose as much as a pound 
a day, but you can't do it by fasting. 
You must eat to reduce. That is the 
big secret of losing weight quickly 
and safely. Certain foods that give 
you the strength and verve to make 
your day a good one also serve the 
double purpose of helping you turn 
that worthless, stored body fat into 
energy. 

Certainly you must cut down to 
three meals a day. Avoid rich foods 
and desserts as if they were poison. 




PPgpPPw !BBW ^ 



By VICTOR H. 
LINDLAHR 




Victor H. Lindlahr can be heard M-F, 12:15 
P.M. EDT, over ABC: sponsored by Serutan. 



You can be sure that all sweet things 
will add fat where you don't want it. 

Here are the basic foods an adult 
must have every day: An egg, two 
glasses of milk (skimmed, if you're 
dieting), two servings of green or 
yellow vegetables, a fresh salad, a 
citrus fruit or juice, generous help- 
ings of lean meat or fish, one or two 
slices of an enriched or whole-grain 
bread. 

If you memorize the above para- 
graph and apply it every day of your 
life, you will be assured of fine health 
and a good figure. An underweight 
or slender person can afford to add 
extras. But, if you want to lose fat, 
your meats and fish must be lean 
to begin with and then broiled, your 
cooked vegetables must be prepared 
without butter or sauce. 

The average, healthy person can 
usually lose weight successfully on 
a daily diet of 1,200 calories made up 
of the stated basic foods. If, after ten 
days, you find that you are not los- 
ing fat rapidly enough, you can re- 
duce your calorie intake further but 
you must be certain that the body 
gets all the vitamins, proteins and 
minerals it needs. Before going on a 
strenuous diet, consult your family 
physician. 

To get in the mood for slenderiz- 
ing, here's a suggestion. Get out 
those playclothes you stored away 
after last summer's vacation. Put on 
your swim suit, then stand in front 
of a mirror. Look at your arms and 
your waist, your hips and thighs. 
Look and look and look. Then let 
what you see guide your appetite. 



What's Spinning? 

(Continued from, page 7) 

to her lovely, throaty voice — I'm So Easy 
to Satisfy, backed by What'll I Do. It's a 
Capitol record. Don Estes, who's out with 
Victor's Be Anything (But Be Mine) and 
Evr'ytime is still at his disc-jockey stand 
in Nashville, Tennessee. He's also star of 
radio shows Sunday Down South and Tin 
Pan Valley. Tony Bennett, Columbia sing- 
ing star, is now writing TV film material. 
We love the way recording companies are 
using folk-song material as material for 
popular artists. From South Africa, Ay- 
round the Corner is now successful. We I 
like Jo Stafford's singing of it the best. 
The Bell Sisters, after recording Hambone 
with Phil Harris, are now busy at their 
usual interests. Sixteen-year-old Cynthia 
is busy swimming the summer away as a 
member of the Huntington Beach Swim- 
ming and Diving Club. Kay is back with 
the Girl Scout Seal Beach troop now work- 
ing hard for some more service badges. 
Cynthia's still got quite a library of un- 
published songs, so perhaps before long 
there will be some more of her selections 
on the way. 

Check the following hits and if you 
have every one in your library, you're a 
Collector; all but two, you're Hep; less 
than that, you'd better start buying. 

1. Don Cornell's recording by Coral of 
I'll Walk Alone. 

2. Merv Griffin's refrain with Freddie 
Martin of Am I In Love? 

3. Idaho State Fair with Victor's Vaughn 
Monroe. 

4. Junco Partner with Richard Hayes, on 
the Mercury label. 

5. Mercury's Goodbye For Awhile with 
Vic Damone, who'll be recording again 
this summer. 

6. Rugged But Right with Phil Harris for 
Victor. 

7. The Wild Side of Life with Mercury's 
Tiny Hill. Real corny but good. 

8. MGM label's Tommy Edwards' My Girl. 

9. Betty Clark singing Funny Melody for 
MGM. 

10. Of course, Doris Day's Columbia record 
of A Guy Is a Guy. 




Johnnie Ray, the sensational new singing 
star, will be on the cover of August 
Radio-TV Mirror. On sole July II. 




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21 



IMephew with a 
nose for news 

WIP's John Facenda is a real on-the-spot reporter 




Dorothy Facenda surveys her two men-folk with loving 
pride. Jackie likes to be in on everything Dad does 
— from practicing golf to reading the morning paper. 





John gives facts a human interest flavor. 



Uncles Ralph, Augustine, and James 
never suspected that their nephew John 
Thomas Ralph Augustine James Facenda 
would make his career in radio. As a matter 
of fact, neither did John or anyone else in 
his family. Philadelphia's most popular 
newsman, on both radio and TV, started out 
with full intentions of becoming an engineer. 
But when he was graduated from Villanova 
College, jobs were all too scarce, and John 
took a temporary job as a reporter on the 
old Evening Public Ledger. 

One day the paper's scholastic sports re- 
porter became ill, and John was assigned to 
replace him on a sports broadcast for the 
paper's own radio station. From that mo- 
ment, seventeen years ago, John knew that 
he had been officially bitten by the "radio 
bug." The next two years meant a hectic 
tour of radio from New York to Philadelphia. 
Freelance announcing, program direction, 
and copywriting. 

In 1937, Facenda went to work for WIP as 
a newscaster, an'd since then has been re- 
porting the news four times daily. He in- 
jects a warm, friendly quality into his news- 
casting, and tops it off with human interest 
anecdotes. As an on-the-spot reporter, 
Facenda is full of ideas and maneuvers which 
help him to get difficult stories. During his 
career he has been into the sea in a diving 
bell, flat on his stomach in a cathedral, and 
atop a grand piano. Object: to get the news 
no matter what! 

John admits that his busy routine as a 
newshound doesn't give him much time to 
relax, but he manages to spend his mornings 
with his family. He always gets up in time 
to have breakfast with his son, twelve-year- 
old Jackie, before he goes off to school. Mrs. 
Facenda usually has a few chores for John 
to do before he goes to the studio. 

Although his job is a demanding one, John 
Facenda couldn't be talked out of radio. 



22 




Bob Carroll 



A lthough Robert Carroll, who plays 
IX Inspector Mark Saber on ABC's 
Mystery Theatre, has never palled 
with policemen or detectives, has never 
been on the scene of a crime, and has 
never been involved with any real-life 
lawbreakers, the actor does a very con- 
vincing job each Wednesday evening as 
the suave sleuth. Bob is used to this sort 
of thing, as he points out: "I once por- 
trayed an ichneumon fly (in Kapek's 
'The Insect Comedy'), and I never even 
heard of such an animal." 

Bob was born in Hamlet, North Caro- 
lina, on March 22, 1920. He dreamed of 
becoming a pianist during his boyhood, 
but at eighteen, while taking a summer 
course at the University of North Caro- 
lina's Chapel Hill, he changed his mind 
and decided to act. Paul Green had 
watched him on the stage, and featured 
him in "The Lost Colony" and "High- 
land Call." His theatrical career was 
interrupted in 1942-1946, when he served 
with the U. S. Army Signal Corps in 
England. He was mustered out a field- 
commissioned second lieutenant. 

Back in the States, Bob determined to 
try his luck on Broadway. The amaz- 
ing thing about his story is that he was 
successful in his first attempt to crash 
the Big Street. He had read in a news- 
paper that Jose Ferrer was casting for a 
production of "Cyrano de Bergerac" and 
decided to play a hunch and try out for 
a part. He got the part, and became a 
personal friend of Mr. Ferrer's. 

Since then, Bob has been seen in the 
stage plays, "Music in My Heart," "The 
Silver Whistle," "The Glass Menagerie," 
and "The Barretts of Wimpole Street." 
His last Broadway role was as Gloria 
Swanson's lover in "Twentieth Century." 
Last October he was cast in the role of 
Mark Saber on Mystery Theatre. Aside 
from this regular radio stint, Bob also 
appears on TV frequently. 

When not busy acting, which is rarely, 
Bob likes to travel — on tramp steamers 
and freighters. His other hobbies are 
composing and playing the piano and 
pipe organ. A Manhattan dweller, Bob 
is six feet tall, has dark hair and brown 
eyes, and still maintains a bachelor 
apartment. 

Mystery Theater is heard Wed., 8 P.M. 
EDT, on ABC, for Sterling Drug Inc. 



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Tom Reddy shares the WJZ kilocycles with three of his sons: Tom, 12, Terry, 10, and Mike, 14. 



h 



e marne 



ied th 



andlady's Uaught 



er 



You won't find Tom Reddy, WJZ's newest 
personality, hanging around with the boys 
after his radio chores are done. With five 
children at home, Tom just doesn't have the 
time to sip coffee on into the evening. His 
programs — The Tom Reddy Show, heard five 
days a week at 6:30 A.M., and Tom's Tabloid, 
another five-day program on at 2 P.M. — keep 
Tom on the go. 

As soon as Tom's Tabloid is off the air, the 
versatile emcee can be seen flying toward the 
commuters' train bound for Plandome, Long 
Island. At least two of the kids tag along 
with Mrs. Reddy when she picks Tom up at 
the station and — from that time until the five 
lively young-uns get to bed — Tom and Mary 
are pretty busy people. The Reddy household 
is kids' paradise, with plenty of garden to get 
muddy in, and plenty of Poppa to romp with. 

Tom has his fun after dinner, when he can 
get down to his workshop basement. There 
he really enjoys himself, remaking old dining- 
room tables into coffee tables and just put- 
tering. 



Born in Omaha, Nebraska, Tom attended 
Wayne Teachers' College. It was during his 
student days at Wayne that he met Mary. She 
was the daughter of the lady who owned the 
house where Tom boarded. They were married 
when he was eighteen. From Wayne, Tom 
went to Notre Dame University, where he 
majored in journalism. After he was gradu- 
ated, he worked as a radio man for various 
stations in the Midwest. 

One night at a party, Tom met Mr. Fitch, 
and several weeks later he was signed for the 
Fitch Band Wagon, originating from Holly- 
wood. In addition to many radio appearances, 
and one movie, Tom has recorded a few very 
popular children's records, including "Desti- 
nation Moon" and "The Ants' Picnic." 

His Tabloid program has most of the fea- 
tures of a miniature newspaper — book and 
movie reviews, letters to the editor, a "best 
male singer or orchestra leader of the week" 
spot. 

Though Tom is a relatively new voice on 
WJZ, he's made many friends. 



24 



What's New 
from Coast to Coast 



(Continued from page 11) 
a single one, so when he finishes high 
school next year he won't have to worry 
about money for his college education. 

Comedian Danny Thomas sincerely be- 
lieves that St. Jude, the patron saint of 
the theatre, watched over him during the 
dark days B.B.B. (Before Big Break). Now 
that he is on top, he wants to build a 
shrine to his venerable Saint — a Saint 
Jude Hospital for the poor. To date, 
through his friends in show business, he 
has raised $53,000 of the million dollars 
which will be needed. 

Now that he's permanently settled in 
New York, Gabby Hayes is sponsoring a 
summer ranch camp for boys in East 
Jewett, New York, in the Catskill Moun- 
tains. Gabby has arranged for underpriv- 
ileged youths from heavily-populated 
Manhattan to be his special guests for the 
summer. 

Oliver J. Dragon, well-known statesman 
of the Kukla, Fran and Ollie troupe, has 
definitely announced his candidacy for 
President. Ollie says, "The man of the 
hour is the man with the tooth," and he's 
even got a rousing campaign song, "Get 
On The Dragon Wagon." Well, he'd get 
the kids' votes, anyway. 

What Ever Happened To . . . 

Margaret "Mug" Richardson, Arthur 
Godfrey's former assistant and "right 
hand"? When Mug resigned her job with 
Godfrey, she returned to her home in 
Washington, and for a while had her own 
television show there. Now she is handling 
radio and television promotion for the 
Federal Civil Defense Administration 
branch of the Government, and spends 
most of her time in the capital. 

Mary Marlowe, who formerly sang with 
Sammy Kaye's orchestra? After leaving 
Kaye, Mary continued singing profession- 
ally for a short time, but has since retired 
from show business completely. 

Michael Raffetto, who played Paul Bar- 
bour, the eldest son on One Man's Family, 
and who also used to direct the program? 
Raffetto, who had been on the show since 
1932, had to give up the role towards the 
end of last year because of a serious throat 
ailment. However, up until a few months 
ago, he did continue to direct the program. 
Unfortunately, because of his illness, he 
also had to relinquish that job. Raffetto's 
many fans and friends in radio are hoping 
he will be able to return to the show be- 
fore too many months have passed. 

Roberta Quinlan, who used to star on 
her own musical television show over 
NBC? At the moment, Roberta has no 
regular radio or television program on the 
air, but she has appeared as a guest singer 
on some of the major TV variety shows. 
She has also formed a night-club act and 
has been playing some of the supper spots 
in the East. Roberta hopes to be back be- 
fore the video cameras this fall. 

These are personalities readers have in- 
quired about. If you have wondered what 
happened to one of your favorites on radio 
or television, drop me a line — Jill Warren, 
Radio-TV Mirror Magazine, 205 East 42nd 
Street, New York City, 17, and I'll do my 
best to find out for you and put the in- 
formation in the column. 



(Note: On all shows, both radio and 
television, be sure to check your local 
papers for time, station and channel). 



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assured: no other type liquid antiseptic- 
germicide for the douche of all those 
tested is so powerful yet safe to tissues. 

Warns Against Use of Vinegar 
Would you use vinegar as a deodor- 
ant? Of course you wouldn't! Would 
you pour vinegar over an open cut 
and expect germicidal protection? 
Of course not ! Vinegar and other 
preparations have valuable uses for 
the household, but no intelligent 
woman should use such homemade 
makeshift solutions for the most 
intimate concern in her life. 

ZONITE'S Miracle-Action 

zonite completely deodorizes. It 
cleanses and flushes away odor- 
causing waste substances and de- 
posits, zonite helps prevent infec- 
tion and kills every germ it reaches. 
It's not always possible to contact all 
the germs in the tract, but you can 
be sure zonite kills every reachable 
germ. Always use as directed. 



Zonite 

THIS IDEAL 'ALL PURPOSE' ANTISEPTIC-GERMI- 
CIDE SHOULD BE IN EVERY MEDICINE CHEST 



FREE' M a 'l coupon for FREE book. 
Reveals intimate facts and gives complete 
information on feminine hygiene. Write 
Zonite Products Corp., Dept. RM-72,100 
Park Avenue, New York 17, N.Y.* 

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City State 

*Offer good only in U.S. and Canada 



25 



"I LOST 45 POUNDS... THANKS TO YOUR 
NEW REDUCING PLAN.'SAYS MINETTE DIXON 

Woman Editor Writes Ann Delaf ield of Amazing Results with 
Famous Beauty Consultant's Easy Way to Lose Weight 




Minette Dixon's enthusiastic letter to 
the renowned beauty authority, Ann 
Delafield, is typical of the grateful 
thanks she has received from hundreds 
of thousands of pupils whom she has 
helped lose weight. 

"With the aid of the Ann Delafield 
Appetite Reducer I was able to carry a 
full time job, and do all my housework 
as well. It seemed no time at all that I 
dropped from 170 to 125 pounds !" 
BE HAPPY- BE SLENDER 
If your story is like Miss Dixon's . . . and 
thousands of other women (and men) 
who have been struggling for years with 
a problem of overweight . . . the Ann 
Delafield Appetite Reducing Plan was 
designed for you. You'll be amazed how 
soon . . . how easily . . . you will find slen- 
der beauty and new happiness ! 

During Miss Delafield's forty years 
of experience in helping people to lose 
weight, she has had pupils from all over 
the world . . . and most of them have 
been recommended by personal physi- 
cians. Based on her accumulated knowl- 
edge of the problem, she has developed 
for you the Ann Delafield Reducing 
Plan... an easy way to reduce that 
doesn't take the fun out of life. 
YOU CAN EAT YOUR CAKE AND HAVE"IT" TOO 
Included in the Ann Delafield Reducing 
Plan are generous, appetizing — yet low- 
calorie— menus. (You even have a piece 
of cake for dessert ! ) The secret of the 
amazing success of her plan is a scien- 
tifically produced . . . and delicious . . . 
wafer called the Ann Delafield Appetite 
Reducer. This pharmaceutically ap- 
proved food supplement satisfies that 
hungry urge between meals . . . without 
adding any ugly pounds. This wafer was 
conceived after years of practical expe- 
rience and endless hours of consultation 
with physicians and dieticians. 

In addition, your diet is supplemented 
by Ann Delafield Vitamin Capsules . . . 
carefully prepared by expert chemists 
to conform to the recommended dietary 
allowances of the Food and Nutrition 
Board of the National Research Coun- 
cil for the contained vitamins. 
DON'T PUT IT OFF 

Begin this easy way to a richer, fuller 
life now! If your doctor has told you 
that your excess weight is not due to a 
glandular disturbance or organic causes, 
start on your Ann Delafield Reducing 
Plan today. The complete package . . . 
containing a book with suggested 
menus and helpful beauty tips, a 30-day 
supply of your Ann Delafield Appetite 
Reducer Wafers and Vitamins costs just 
$6.95; the repeat package just $5.95. 



BEFORE 

Weight -170 lbs. Weight 



AFTER^^ 
-125 lbs. ) 





Before Minette Dixon tried the Ann Delafield 
Appetite Reducing Plan she weighed 170 
pounds. Every attempt to lose weight was an 
unhappy failure ... but it was a different story 
after trying Miss Delafield's easy, natural way 
to reduce. 

"Dear Miss Delafield," she wrote. "A won- 
derful thing has been accomplished with me. 



WITH THE HELP OF THE ANN DELAFIELD APPE- 
TITE reducer, I have lost 45 horrible pounds 
rapidly and becomingly. I was able not only to 
carry on a full time job, but to do all of my 
own housework as well. All of which goes to 
prove that reducing with the Ann Delafield 
Appetite Reducers is truly the vital way to 
beauty." 

Minette Dixon, New York City* 





BEFORE 

ght-150 



AFTER 

lbs. Weight — 119 lbs. 



Mary Ann Llewellyn Looks Ten Years Younger! 

When Mary Ann Llewellyn tried the Ann Delafield 
Reducing Plan she discovered one of the magical results 
of losing weight a natural, healthy way. She maintained 
her vital energy and even slept better than she had for 
months. She looked and felt younger! Reporting her 
happy achievement to Miss Delafield, Mrs. Llewellyn 
wrote this . . . 

"My friends say / look ten years younger since I lost 
those thirty ugly pounds! Whenever I've tried to reduce in 
the past, I've always felt hungry, but the Ann Delafield 
Appetite Reducer Wafer' kept me so well satisfied that I 
was never tempted to take extra food. Thanks for giving 
us women an easy way to reduce!" 

Mary Ann Llewellyn, New York City* 
* Address on request from Rexall, Los Angeles. 



exalt 

dru ggists of America J SOLD AT REXALL DRUG STORES EVERYWHERE 



They thought I was 
snobbish and 
stuck-up because 
I was wrapped 
in a solitary dream 



b 




When I have daughters of my own, I'll tell them many things I myself learned — too late 

our Precious years 



If I were a high school girl today, I 
would use those precious four 
years quite differently. Not that I 
don't think I'm the luckiest girl in 
the world, because I am, and every- 
thing has turned out wonderfully. 
But it could have been difficult for 
me, because through my own short- 



sightedness I missed some of the 
happiest experiences that belong to 
the teen years and now, at twenty- 
two, I am still learning some of the 
lessons I should have learned then. 
In my case, however, my adored 
home folks — my mother and my 
grandparents — kept my feet on the 



See Next Page. 



OUR PRECIOUS YEARS 



ground, even though my head was always in the 
clouds of the musical career I so much wanted. They 
made up to me for the friendships I missed because 
shyness ,and self -consciousness held me back from 
the boys and girls in my own age group. They were 
my consolation when I was picked last for the girls' 
teams, and when one of my schoolmates got a boy's 
fraternity pin and I didn't. But I don't think that 
even my family, understanding as they were, realized 
how many normal teen-age interests and how much 
fun I was deliberately turning away from and how 
wrapped up I was in my own solitary dreams. 

I began to entertain when I was only three. My 
mother, who was a widow, and I lived with my 
grandparents and, when they noticed that I sang and 
danced all the time for the sheer joy of doing it, they 
showed me off proudly to everyone who came. My 
first "public performance" was when I sang "Ave 
Maria" at the Scottish Rite Cathedral in St. Louis. 
All through my grade school and high school days, 
I was not only studying music and taking dancing 
lessons, but I was singing on radio and in fight opera 
and working with local dramatic groups, and dream- 
ing of the time when arithmetic and grammar would 
no longer have to be learned. History, languages and 
English literature I loved, because they helped me 
to understand the grown-up world I was going to 
conquer when my schooldays were over. All my 
marks were good, for I was a (Continued on page 88) 



a 




from his 

HEART 



By JOHN ROSS 



Poised and confident now, Marion can smile with 
happiness as she duets with tenor Frank Parker. 




FrumK.fti>ifa>L 



found, by 



Frank Parker sat at his desk going over his fan 
mail. He sorted the requests for pictures into one 
pile to be handled as soon as he could get around 
to autographing the photos. Into another stack, he put 
the letters which required an answer giving informa- 
tion about himself or the Cities Service program on 
which he was then working. Sighing a little at the fact 
that, working as hard as he could, the pile of letters 
just didn't seem to decrease much and there was still 
a huge stack to go, he picked up the next one, a letter 
written on hospital stationery. 

"Dear Mr. Parker: I listen faithfully to your pro- 
gram every week and enjoy it very much," the letter 
began, much as had most fan mail before it. "I am 
only ten years old, but sometimes your singing touches 
me so deeply, I cry. Two weeks from now I'm going 
to have an operation. The operation will be performed 



No fan mail could mean more 
to Frank Parker than those 
through-the-years letters — 
with that musical signature. 





sharing his lucky song, he brought hope and happiness to a girl who desperately needed it 



the day after your program and I have a special favor 
to ask. Would you sing just one song, especially for 
me? I'd like to take that song with me into the oper- 
ating room to give me the courage to go on." The 
letter was signed "Patricia." 

Frank carefully folded the letter and put it in his 
pocket. Sing her a song? Of course he would! But, in 
the meantime, he'd go and see her at the hospital. 

On his way to St. Clare's Hospital the next day, 
Frank thought about the power of a song. Everyone 
has a favorite song. Some are chosen for their melody, 
others for the eloquence of their lyrics, lyrics which 
may remind someone of a person who is near and 
dear. Songs can represent a sentimental keepsake, a 
memory of an evening kept close in the recesses of 
the heart, of a dance — or perhaps of a dream. Frank 
remembered back to the twenties when he first 



realized that one song was his favorite, one song his 
musical four-leaf clover. 

It was the night that the producers of Frank's 
Broadway musical, "My Princess," had decided the 
show must be closed after a very brief run. Sitting 
in his dressing room, Frank was aware that he now 
faced, once again, the round of the theatrical agencies, 
the auditions, the rehearsals, (Continued on page 89) 



Marion Marlowe and Frank Parker are heard on Arthur Godfrey 
Time, M-F, 10-11:30 A.M„ CBS, for Chesterfield, Nabisco, 
Pillsbury, Pepsodent, Rinso, ReaLemon and Toni (simulcast 
Mon. through Thurs, 10:15-10:30, on CBS-TV); King Arthur 
Godfrey's Round Table, Sun., 5 P.M., on CBS, for Kingan & 
Co.; Arthur Godfrey and His Friends, Wed., 8 P.M., CBS-TV, 
for Toni, Pillsbury and Chesterfield. All times are EDT. 



29 




Our wives even look like twins — that's my Alyce at left, Lois Linkletter at right, with 
Marybelle and Roland, two of the little French war orphans our families have "adopted." 



IT happens every other day, in a market or 
at a kid's shoe store or some other well- 
trafficked stopover ori a busy woman's 
itinerary. 

An acquaintance comes up to my wife, Alyce, 
smiles, and a conversation ensues: 

"How's your husband?" 

"Just fine." 

"Must keep him busy . . . with TV now, on 
top of all those radio shows." 

"It does indeed." 

"Still just five children?" (This is a laugh 
line, I think.) 

"So far." (Polite laughter.) 

"Still living in Holmby Hills?" 



"Of Course. Charlie loves that location too 
much ever to move." 

"Charlie?" 

"Yes, my husband." 

"But aren't you Lois Linkletter?" 

"No, I'm Alyce Correll." 

In some other store, on some other street, 
Lois probably is playing out the same little 
scene in reverse with some other old friend. 

Amusingly enough, although they hail from 
the opposite ends of the country, and met only 
seven years ago at one of those big soirees 
Sid Strotz used to throw every now and then 
for everybody in radio, my wife and Lois 
Linkletter, except upon very close inspection — 



30 



LINKLETTER 



You really get to 

know a man when you have 

him for a friend 



b 



t 





(Andy of Amos 'n' Andy) 



Alyce's eyes are brown, Lois's blue — are iden- 
tical twins. 

Which is only one of the many, many things 
Art Linkletter and I (see above) have in 
common. 

We met twelve years ago, have been the 
closest friends — and our wives and children 
have been friends for the past seven. I'd have 
to ask the doc for a {Continued on page 84) 

Art Linkletter's House Party heard M-F, 3:15 P.M., 
CBS, for Pillsbury and Lever Bros. Charles Correll, 
on Amos 'n' Andy, Sun., 7:30 P.M., CBS, for Rexall 
Drug Co. The TV version of Amos 'n' Andy is seen 
Thurs., 8:30 P.M., for Blatz Beer. All times EDT. 




No one can say I look like Link! But we 
have many interests in common, like to 
go the same places — very often together. 



31 



WHEN YOU'RE HAPPY AS I AM, YOU WANT DESPERATELY TO SEE ANOTHER 



All that 

glitters is 
not romance 



k [Immi 



[kn 



CWJUl 



Is telling a lie ever justified? Well . . . that's 
one of those questions you hope nobody 
will ever ask you pointblank. Of course, 
as newspaperwoman Wendy Warren — the part 
I play on CBS every weekday — my answer 
isn't a problem. It's a straight, unqualified no. 
There's no earthly justification for printing a 
newspaper unless it brings nothing but abso- 
lute factual truth before the reading public. 
But as Florence Freeman, woman . . . well, 
let me put it this way. Is there a single one of 
us who can't remember a time when a little 
white lie did more good than otherwise? 

It was a cocktail party that put. me in the 
way of doing this particular kind of good. A 
cocktail party I had completely forgotten 
about that spring afternoon when, on my way 
out of the CBS building after a broadcast and 
a script conference, I was eagerly looking 
forward to a nice pre-dinner rest. Just to be 
sure, though, I stopped and checked my little 
pocket diary to see if there were any errands 
or appointments I had overlooked — and there 
it was. M.S. — that was a writer I knew — cock- 
tails, try for 4:30. I groaned aloud. Marcia 
Selden was an old, old friend, and I simply 
had to put in an appearance. She was leaving 
that night for Europe. That's probably why 
I forgot about the party, I thought dryly. 
I'm so envious of her vacation I can't bear to 
think about it — what the psychiatrists call a 
mental block. 

Mental! Head! I put my hand up to my hat- 
less topknot and groaned again. That would 
teach me to be so busy I skipped the hair- 
dresser. My hair had needed cutting and shap- 
ing since the middle of last week, but things 
had been just too hectic . . ." and now! Marcia's 



friends were always so very, very well 
groomed — I just couldn't turn up this way. 
I ruffled my hair and thought. Wasn't there a 
delightful little hat shop right near our build- 
ing, on Madison? I went out and turned and, 
sure enough, there it was. I paused before 
the window. That little straw, with the single 
lovely flower — perhaps. Thank heaven, I had 
on my blue silk suit. With that little hat, I'd 
be more or less equal to Marcia's crowd. 

There were three or four customers already 
in the shop, and I wandered around for a 
moment, afraid time would crowd up on me. 
Then a tall, slender girl approached from the 
back, and in a few moments we were under 
way, at a mirrored table, with a little group 
of hats from which I was sure I could make a 
selection. As I was trying on the straw I'd 
seen in the window, the girl leaned forward 
toward the mirror and said suddenly, "Of 
course, I knew I'd seen you — you're Wendy 
Warren, aren't you? I mean — Florence Free- 
man." She laughed and blushed, and I saw 
that she was very pretty when she sparkled 
like that. I smiled back. 

"Oh, 'Wendy' is good enough," I said. 
"Sometimes I have the most dreadful time 
disentangling myself from that girl after a 
broadcast." 

"I don't blame you. I used to listen all the 
time, back home. When I came home from 
school for lunch, I'd put the kitchen radio on 
just at twelve. . . ." She stopped smiling and 
held up a little pink (Continued on page 102) 



Wendy Warren and the News is heard M-F, 12 noon 
EDT, on CBS; sponsored by Maxwell House Coffee. 



32 



WOMAN— EVEN A STRANGER— GET THE BEAUTY SHE DESERVES FROM LIFE 




The abrupt change in her manner caught my attention. I found out she was in love with the boy back home, yet 
here she was lonely, unhappy, unwilling to give up her dreams of a shining life. What could I do to help? 



33 



less topKnox ana giuaiieu agtun. xnoi, wuum — -™ -*■ * \ — --- * »- ' 

teach me to be so busy I skipped the hair- 

dresser. My hair had needed cutting and shap- 
ing since the middle of last week, but things Wendy Warren and the News is heard M-F, 12 noon 
had been just too hectic ..." and now! Marcia's EDT, on CBS; sponsored by Maxwell House Coffee. 



I 



32 



WHEN YOU 



^ HAPPY AS I AM, YOU WANT DESPERATELY TO SEE ANOTHER I WOMAN-EVEN A STRANGER-GET THE BEAUTY SHE DESERVES 



FROM LIFE 



All that 

glitters is 
not romance 



H 



[Immt vhti 



WW/ 



Is TfXLmc a lie ever justified? Well . . . that's 
one of those questions you hope nobody 

will ever ask you pointblank. Of course, 
as newspaperwoman Wendy Warren— the part 
I play on CBS every weekday— my answer 
isn't a problem. It's a straight, unqualified no. 
There's no earthly justification for printing a 
newspaper unless it brings nothing but abso- 
lute factual truth before the reading public. 
But as Florence Freeman, woman . . . well, 
let me put it this way. Is there a single one of 
us who can't remember a time when a little 
white lie did more good than otherwise? 

It was a cocktail party that put. me in the 
way of doing this particular kind of good. A 
cocktail party I had completely forgotten 
about that spring afternoon when, on my way 
out of the CBS building after a broadcast and 
a script conference, I was eagerly looking 
forward to a nice pre-dinner rest. Just to be 
sure, though, I stopped and checked my little 
pocket diary to see if there were any errands 
or appointments I had overlooked — and there 
it was. M.S. — that was a writer I knew — cock- 
tails, try for 4:30. I groaned aloud. Marcia 
Selden was an old, old friend, and I simply 
had to put in an appearance. She was leaving 
that night for Europe. That's probably why 
I forgot about the party, I thought dryly. 
I'm so envious of her vacation I can't bear to 
think about it — what the psychiatrists call a 
mental block. 

Mental! Head! I put my hand up to my hat- 
less topknot and groaned again. That would 
teach me to be so busy I skipped the hair- 
dresser. My hair had needed cutting and shap- 
ing since the middle of last week, but things 
had been just too hectic . . .' and now! Marcia's 



friends were always so very, very well 
groomed— I just couldn't turn up this way. 
I ruffled my hair and thought. Wasn't there a 
delightful little hat shop right near our build- 
ing, on Madison? I went out and turned and, 
sure enough, there it was. I paused before 
the window. That little straw, with the single 
lovely flower— perhaps. Thank heaven, I had 
on my blue silk suit. With that little hat, I'd 
be more or less equal to Marcia's crowd. 

There were three or four customers already 
in the shop, and I wandered around for a 
moment, afraid time would crowd up on me. 
Then a tall, slender girl approached from the 
back, and in a few moments we were under 
way, at a mirrored table, with a little group 
of hats from which I was sure I could make a 
selection. As I was trying on the straw I'd 
seen in the window, the girl leaned forward 
toward the mirror and said suddenly, "Of 
course, I knew I'd seen you — you're Wendy 
Warren, aren't you? I mean — Florence Free- 
man." She laughed and blushed, and I saw 
that she was very pretty when she sparkled 
like that. I smiled back. 

"Oh, 'Wendy' is good enough," I said. 
"Sometimes I have the most dreadful time 
disentangling myself from that girl after a 
broadcast." 

"I don't blame you. I used to listen all the 
time, back home. When I came home from 
school for lunch, I'd put the kitchen radio on 
just at twelve. . . ." She stopped smiling and 
held up a little pink (Continued on page 102) 



Wendy Warren and the News is heard M-F, 12 noon 
EDT, on CBS; sponsored by Maxwell House Coffee. 









r 



• 



Hi 



The abrupt change in her manner caught my attention. I found out she was in love with the boy back home, yet 
here she was lonely, unhappy, unwilling to give up her dreams of a shining life. What could I do to help? 




Johnny and Penny 01 sen - 



34 




Penny's a born collector of items old 
or new, simply dotes on keeping house. 



By GLADYS HALL 



You have fun when you look at — and listen to — 
Johnny Olsen's Rumpus Room over Du Mont TV? 
You like the Olsens, Penny and Johnny? 
Sometimes they make you laugh like a loon. Now and 
again, they give your heartstrings a tug. They're that 
kind. Both before the cameras and off stage. Take 
the day they were reminiscing. The first thing 
you know, the Olsens were telling tales out of school. 
On each other. Just like every other husband and wife. 
And there they were, holding hands right in plain 
view on the table, all the while! 

It all began when Penny said yes, she'd had a great 
adjustment to make in the first year of marriage. 
But, before she could say what the adjustment was, 
Johnny was right in there with the information that he'd 
had an adjustment to make bejore marriage — in short, 
while he was courting Penny. 

"I had to make a 320-mile drive every weekend 
to see her," said Johnny, "160 miles each way. 
She lived in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. I lived in 
Milwaukee. I decided it was cheaper to get married. The 
phone calls and all. (Continued on page 85) 

Rumpus Room is seen weekdays, 1 P.M.: sponsored Mon., Wed., 
Fri. by Sauce Arturo (Premier Foods). Kids and Company seen 
Sat., 11 A.M., for Red Goose Shoes. Both EDT, on Du Mont. 



JLliis husband- wife team 
fills the Rumpus Room with 
laughter and love because 
that's the way they are — 
particularly about each other 




The Olsen dream home is a symbol of hopes and 
heartaches shared since a certain fateful day. 



Two Special People 



35 



B 






ARBARA DREAMED OF A STAR-TOUCHED ROMANCE, AND TO HER 




Five busy students of basket-weaving, all named Edwards: Garry, Barbara, Laurie, Ralph, and Christine. 



36 



AMAZEMENT HER DREAM CAME TRUE! 




Trixie, the poodle, is also a member of the 
family (left). Barbara and Ralph have passed 
a number of notable milestones since their 
marriage — such as cutting a cake, some years 
back, for his fabulous Truth or Consequences. 



R 




.4- 



rince charming 
of the airwaves 



• By BETH MILLER 



Laurie thinks Dad's perfect as a barbecue chef. 




Sunday afternoon at the Sheldons' family home 
in Westchester County, New York, was passing 
in its usual peaceful way, with the parents and 
grandparents reading the Sunday papers and with 
Barbara Sheldon, brown-eyed, dark-curly-haired 
teenager, whiling away the hours until dinner time 
by strumming away at the piano. It was much like 
the Sunday afternoons that had gone before, and 
there was no premonition on Barbara's part that 
these Sunday afternoons would change their pattern 
much in the years to come. As the sunset faded, her 
family would gather around the dinner table, along 
with several friends Barbara had invited and, after 
a good full meal, they would all spend a Sunday 
evening talking quietly around the family fireplace. 



The Ralph Edwards Show can be heard every Saturday at 8:30 
P.M. EDT, over the National Broadcasting Company network. 



37 




RALPH EDWARDS 



p, 



rince charming 
of the airwaves 




Outdoors, Ralph joins the youngsters in a bit of 
miniature home-building. Indoors, Barbara teaches 
Christine real grown-up housekeeping and cooking. 



When Barbara went to the door to let her friends 
in, however, she found herself looking into the blue 
eyes of a stranger, fleetingly glimpsed the reddest 
hair she'd ever seen on a man. Her friends intro- 
duced the stranger as Ralph Edwards, a young radio 
announcer who had come out from New York to 
spend Sunday with them. 

"All I remember thinking was, 'He's an older 
man!' " Barbara says today. 

Barbara was a freshman in the Sarah Lawrence 
College for girls, and anyone four years her senior 
would have seemed practically ancient. But, before 
the evening was over, the simple front parlor of her 
home had been touched by enchantment. Revived 
were .the dreams of Barbara's girlhood when she. 
thought of the land of silver screens and magic 
microphones, where young men all had the aura of 
Prince Charmings. For, with words, Ralph Edwards 
was bringing into the Westchester County home the 
whole magic society of show business. 

Ralph made the whole family laugh as he recounted 
his adventures. Just recently he'd left his Cali- 
fornia home and successful radio career to try his 
hand at the theatre which had been his first love. 
While he was en route from the West Coast, the play 
in which he was to have had a small but introductory 
part folded, and he landed in New York with slim 
savings to see him through the next few weeks of 
tramping from one theatrical agency to another. All 
the time Ralph was telling this story, Grandfather 
Sheldon was hanging on every word. And, when. 
Ralph came to the last part, which was his re- 
entrance into radio with some forty-five announcing 
jobs a week, Grandfather Sheldon laughed out loud. 

"Son, I knew that voice of yours — I'm one of your 
most ardent fans!" 

"All evening the two of them talked," said Bar- 



bara. "Grandfather was enthralled and I must say 
f listened, too — fascinated with this older man." 

When Ralph left that evening, Grandfather Sheldon 
had managed to extract a promise from Ralph that 
he would get some tickets to Ralph's radio shows. 
Because Ralph is the kind of man who keeps his 
promises, he showered Grandfather Sheldon with 
tickets to radio shows following the Sunday spent at 
their home. Barbara suspected (and her suspicions 
were not far wrong) that Ralph was hoping Grand- 
father Sheldon just might invite Barbara to accom- 
pany him to one of the shows. 

But Barbara was busy studying child psychology 
at college, and she and her mother were concerned 
with a career for her. Barbara and her mother had 
often spoken about a life work. "I was so interested 
in young children that I was convinced that this was 
the proper field for me to be studying," Barbara says. 
"Now, of course, I find it so difficult to apply what 
I learned to my own children. But it would have 
been fun to be a teacher and tell other parents what 
to do." Interested in her career, as she was, it was 
four sets of tickets and a month later before Barbara 
found time from her busy schedule to go with Grand- 
father Sheldon to one of Ralph's shows. 

"It was as fascinating as Ralph had made it sound. 
I loved every thrilling moment of it, but I was the 
one who suffered stage fright, never Ralph! He was 
as easygoing before the microphone then, as un- 
ruffled, as he is today." 



During the year-and-a-half courtship that fol- 
lowed, Barbara found she was still suffering 
nervous pangs every time she would go to Ralph's 
performances. But the nervousness Barbara suffered 
was far outweighed by the glamour of Ralph's jobs. 
His night announcing chores were from glamorous 
New York night spots which featured half -hour dance 
music broadcasts. 

"Our evenings were spent in some of the city's 
swankiest clubs," Barbara recalls. "I can just imagine 
how I must have sounded to my girl friends at college 
when I was recalling Ralph's dates. A bit more blase, 
I'm sure, than I really felt! Here was a whole new 
world opening up for me. Show business with its 
spontaneous thrills, laughs and excitement. After we 
began casually dating, we started going steady. I 
was filled with happiness — and, I must say, I was 
made less interested in child psychology and a career." 

When it became apparent to the family that Bar- 
bara was becoming seriously interested in this young 
red-headed radio man, Barbara's grandmother — "A 
member of the old school who thought anyone in 
show business was not reliable" — took her aside for 
some common-sense advice. "Now, Barbara," she said 
seriously, "take heed, show folks aren't for the front 
parlor!" 

But Ralph was as at home in the front parlor as he 
was on the stage, and he had a stout ally in Grand- 
father (and his radio show tickets). Even Grand- 
mother came around to (Continued on page 98) 




Barbara goes where Ralph goes — including Truth or Consequences, the New Mexico resort town named after 
his program. There she is, parading on horseback, and there's Ralph enjoying the fish fry which followed. 



39 





Before the cameras filming 

Hawkins Falls, my dramatic announcement 

I was going to have a bahy was brief, 

intense, explosive. In real life 

the drama was even greater — 



On the show, my make-believe husband, Laif Flagle 
(Win Stracke), was flabbergasted by the news which I, 
as Millie, broke to him. In reality, my own husband, 
John, guessed the happy truth before I knew it myself! 




By ROS TWOHEY 



Since I grew old enough to be told the facts of 
life, I've heard women say, "Having a baby 
is the most wonderful thing in the world." 

My own reaction to that phrase has varied 
and, in the changes of my attitude, I can trace 
the stages of my own growth. 

When I was a youngster, it fell meaningless 
on my ears. People always had babies and so 
what? Later, at the smarty age, I dismissed 
it as pure corn. 

Living a little longer, I began to suspect so 
oft-repeated a statement might possibly reflect 
a deep, moving, fundamental truth. Like belief 
in God, it might be one of those emotions people 
find so difficult to express that they don't try 
merely taking refuge in well-used words. 

As I write this, I can only say, "I don't know. 
I don't yet know. I won't know before the 
actual moment of birth." 

That moment is very near. In fact, our baby 
will have been born by the time you read this. 
But what John and I have already discovered 
has been so precious to us that I want to set it 
down now, so we can read it later and remem- 
ber: "This is the way it was. This is what the 
coming of our baby meant to us, even before 
we knew." 

Already, the entire experience has been so 
wonder-filled that old labels no longer fit any 
part of it. While I have carried another life 



40 



to have a BABY *W^ 




Life looks different and everyone's been wonderful — like Bernardine Flynn (with orchid), who gave a shower for me. 



within my own body, many things which have 
been going on ever since the human race began 
have become, for me, direct, personal and 
brand-new. 

This encompassing emotion of simple, honest 
wonder surprises both John and me. We did 
not expect to feel this way about having a baby. 
In the beginning, we were quite matter-of-fact 
about it. 

Married five years, we took pride in having 
learned to be very practical people. We met 
overseas, when John was the G.I. technician 



assigned to make arrangements for the play put 
on by my U.S.O. unit. We married soon after 
his return to the States and moved immediately 
to Chicago, where he enrolled at Illinois Tech 
and I, to bolster the family budget, sought radio 
and television parts. 

I continued to work after he left school for a 
job in the claims department of an insurance 
company, and our (Continued on page 99) 

Hawkins Falls, Pop. 6200 is seen M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, 
NBC-TV; sponsored by Lever Brothers Co. for Surf. 



41 



Yoim£ Dr. Malone 




Young Dr. Malone sat on a park bench in New York City trying to think out a solution to his 
problem. All around him the city hummed with a desultory summer pace. Life would be so good 
if only he had Anne and little Jill with him — the wife he loved, and didn't dare possess, the daughter 
whose very life he had once helped to save. But — was it fair, was it honest, was it right, to accept 
Anne back as his wife, integrate his daughter into his new-found life? A deep sense of pride and an 
overwhelming shame enveloped him as he sat reviewing the events of the last few years. Three years, 
to be exact. It was three years ago that Dr. Jerry Malone had come to live in New York, while Anne 
and Jill remained in the small town of Three Oaks. Jerry loved his family, needed his family, but 
because of his blindness, his lack of trust in their love, he had become involved in one situation 
after another. In New York, Jerry was to take a position with the Institute for Rural Research. 
Anne and Jill were to follow after Jerry had made plans for their living arrangements. But, almost 
immediately, Lucia — beautiful, proud, wealthy Lucia, principal stockholder in the institute — had met and 
decided she wanted Jerry. By the time Anne arrived in New York, Lucia had succeeded in placing 
her in such an unfortunate position that Jerry had thought Anne was jealous of his success. Even in 
his heart of hearts, Jerry couldn't yet believe that Lucia had maneuvered for almost two years to 
to keep him bound to her. It wasn't until Dr. Paul Browne, one of the staff members and Jerry's 
closest friend, had been driven to a nervous breakdown by Lucia that Jerry found insight into Lucia's 
true character. Jerry let his head fall into his hands in shame. Everything he touched had seemed 
to cause harm — always unintentional, but always hurting those he loved. There was Mary, too, 
sweet innocent Mary, Dr. Browne's daughter, who loved Jerry. When he removed himself from 
her immediate sphere, in order to save her pride, Mary had married young Ernest Horton, 
certainly not as the result of mature love, but rather as a rebound from her love for Jerry. Back in 
Three Oaks, Anne, too, seemed to have found a man to love her — Sam Williams, a fine man and perhaps 
he had within him the makings of a fine husband and a wonderful father. Jerry tried to be 
objective about the situation in which he found himself. Should he return to Anne and Jill? Or 
is it better that Anne be allowed to forget him and, even though it means facing a lonely future, 
should he go on without his family? And if he makes this decision — -could it be that Jerry will once more 
unintentionally bring harm to those he loves? 

Young Dr. Malone is heard M-F, 1:30 P.M. EDT, on CBS, for Crisco. The cast, as pictured here, includes: 
Dr. Jerry Malone, played by Sandy Becker; Anne Malone, Barbara Weeks; and Sam Williams, Martin Blaine. 



Sam Williams might make a wonderful husband for Anne 
and father for Jill. Or so Jerry thought, alone in New York. 




s 



HOULD A MAN'S PAST BE 



ALLOWED TO STAND 



BETWEEN HIMSELF AND 



THE WOMAN HE LOVES? 





\ 



^r -\ 



Y 



\ 



t 




\ 






II 






\ 





ueen for a Day 




It was the blindest of blind dates 
when Janet was met by a certain shy 
lieutenant at the airport in Tucson. 



and forever! 

Two tickets for Jack Bailey's program won 
Janet a lifetime of love and happiness 
By BETTY MILLS 



Pretty, vivacious, dark-haired Janet Brier and her 
mother sat in the studio audience of Queen For a 
Day. Master of ceremonies Jack Bailey was making 
the two women laugh, but seventeen-year-old Janet's 
laughter had a high-pitched, nervous quality. A few 
minutes before, she had bitten her lip in concentration, 
trying to think of an interesting way of expressing her 
lifetime wish in a few words, words she was writing on 
a slip of paper to be collected by studio ushers and 
shown to Mr. Bailey. For she (Continued on page 83) 

Queen for a Day is heard M-F, 11:30 A.M. EDT, MBS, under 
the sponsorship of Old Gold (P. Lorillard) and Kraft Foods. 





Now Janet has three marvelous prizes the program never planned — a husband, a son, and a cosy home. 
Her albums tell the whole fabulous story, starting from the moment Jack Bailey crowned her Queen. 



44 







ft 



fa: 



p' *Tv ► 



««s 



w-v« 



-TT: ! 



fi\»VHf?j 



ISA 





I fell in love 
at first sight 



"My mother said I was too young to know my heart, 
but I was not too young at all . . ." says Toni Gilman 



Toni grew up — but never outgrew her dream — now has daughters of her own, Mary Jean and Susann. 






Buzz immerman was "so romantic," but Ton! never guessed how 
very much so — till his scrapbooks revealed a wonderful secret. 



By HELEN BOLSTAD 



With his most skeptical stare, Moderator 
Bergen Evans pinioned the Down 
You Go panel. "Your answer, 'Love 
at first sight,' was reached in record time. 
Surely you don't believe it actually happens." 

Toni Gilman's dark eyes flashed. "I 
certainly do. I fell in love at first sight. 
What's more, I married the man." 

The story she could have told, if TV time 
permitted, began in story-book style on the 
Lunt Avenue bus, a vehicle which lumbers 
leisurely across town near the boundary 
where Evanston merges with Chicago. 

Few persons were in transit the afternoon 
of that spring-promising March eleventh, and 
Toni, although making an elaborate pretense 
of studying a textbook, couldn't resist 
stealing glances at the boy who had pelted 
down the steps of the elevated and flung 
himself into the seat opposite hers. His 
shoulders were broad, his hair was curly, he 
was more than six feet tall, and of course 
he was handsome. So handsome, in fact, that 
Toni just plain stared. 

Inevitably, she got caught at it. Their eyes 
met and, as she felt a blush burn up 
her throat, he checked her embarrassment 
with a grin. Leaning (Continued on page 104) 

Down You Go is seen Fri., 9 P.M. EDT, Du Mont, for 
Old Gold; it is heard Sat., 7:30 P.M. EDT, Mutual. 




When the youngsters say their prayers at bedtime, Toni adds 
her own silent thanks for the blessings true love brought her. 



47 




the home 



"Comfortable American" 
is the Monroe description 
of their home and family 

By 
JESSYCA GAVER 



The master bedroom is a cozy "extra parlor" where Vaughn and Marian chat after Candy and Christy go to bed. 







& 



V 



aughn picked up for a song 





Vaughn's a man of many hobbies, has a special workshop 
in the basement where he wood-works gifts for friends. 



The house has everything four Monroes could dream of — 
breakfast nook, patio, outdoor barbecue, tennis courts. 



ON a certain U-shaped street in a certain 
Boston suburb, there's a house as pretty 
as a melody — a harmonious blending of 
red and black brick, based on a Georgian colonial 
theme, with rhythm in every line. And why 
shouldn't it look like lovely music? It's the 
happy home of Vaughn Monroe, his pretty wife, 
Marian, and their two daughters, Candy and Christy. 

"I picked it up for a song," quips the star of 
NBC's Saturday night Vaughn Monroe show. 
"One that had to sell a million records first!" 
Marian chimes in, completing the little family joke 
they use to "explain" the special treasures 
Vaughn's well-loved voice has brought them. 

When the singing bandleader isn't touring with 
his show, or making a movie out Hollywood 
way, a typical summer day will find him back 
of the house in New Weston, Massachusetts. 
He'll be playing tennis with his daughters on one of 
the two courts beyond the arch of arborvitae. 
Or spraying his prized apple trees, while some of 
Chris's and Candy's friends join them at the 
kiddy gym and swings Vaughn set up. Or romping 
with Penny, the family's large brown-and-white 
shepherd collie, with an occasional longing look 
at the almost-private golf course which 
belongs to a club but closely (Continued on page 67) 

Vaughn Monroe stars on the Camel Caravan, Saturday at 10 
P.M. EDT, NBC: sponsored by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. 





It's a giant jackpot of a family Sue and Warren Hull have these days: Flanking the happy pair on the sofa — 
the two girls, Sally and Buffy; forming the honor guard — four stalwart boys, Bud, George, Paul and John. 



50 



Warren always wanted a daughter, enjoys playing proud papa as Buffy starts off on a date. 




Strikes it rich ! 

A man may have his work and his sons, but 
he still needs a mate to make life perfect 



By MARTIN COHEN 



The Four Musketeers of Westchester County 
— Warren Hull and his three sons, John, 
George and Paul — have disbanded. No longer 
does the sign For Men Only hang on the door of 
their Scarsdale home. For Warren, like many 
fortunate contestants on his famous show, has struck 
it rich himself: Wan-en won himself a bride. 

To his neighbors as well as his enormous radio 
and TV audience, Warren's spontaneous smile 
and cheerful warmth may have been deceiving. 
Because he dealt with heart-rending problems of 
others, everyone took for granted that here 
was a man untouched by loneliness. 

No one examined the facts: Warren was a 
mature, handsome man living a bachelor's life with 
three sons. Because he liked it? Hardly, when 

Strike It Rich is heard on NBC at 11 A.M., Monday through 
Friday. It is seen on CBS-TV, 11:30 A.M., M-F, and 9 P.M., 
Wed. All times EDT. Sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. 




Candidly, a happy pair: Sue and Warren 
treasure their "alone-together" moments. 



51 



Strikes it rich 




With Warren helping at the chores, Sue learns how 
really nice it is to have a man around the house — 
still takes pleasure in such motherly missions as 
helping Sally wrap a birthday present for a friend. 




he frequently reminisced about the marital happiness his 
parents and grandparents enjoyed. Then there were his 
three sons, not so old that they didn't require the guidance 
of a mother and not so young that they didn't know what 
they were missing. 

"Considering the circumstances, the boys and myself got 
along famously in our 'fraternity,' " Warren says. "But it 
wasn't good and far from easy, being mother and father 
to the kids." 

Parental responsibility had never been taken as matter 
of course by any Hull. Warren remembers his father's 
guidance, the long houis of talk, the incredible patience. 
He has heard stories of his grandfather, a Quaker min- 
ister, grouping his children at the head of the stairs before 
bedtime each night for discussion and Bible readings. But 
Warren, trying to be mother and father to three bright, 
active boys, encountered difficulties that were insur- 
mountable. If he wanted to help them on a long project 
or even follow through on some necessary discipline, his 
work interfered. His job might take him away from the 
house for twenty-four hours or a week. Because kids 
need affection as well as discipline, it was impossible for 
Warren to be stern when, on the other hand, there was 
no one left to comfort the boys. 

"It seems to me that in most families when one parent 
lays down the law, the other softens the blow," he says. 




•V.V 



No longer a widow, Sue finds it's twice as much fun 
getting Buffy all spruced up for her teen-age dates. 



f 





■■*'. 

I 



m 



■ i|& 



\ 




Paul's beloved Green Dragon — the car he bought out of his own savings — is a center of activity and discussion for the 
masculine wing of the family, assisted by the dog, Brandy, and sidewalk-supervised by Leolia, who runs the household. 



"I had to do both and therefore took a middle course." 

That the Hull boys were quite happy to give up their 
fraternity life is a matter of record. They take a good 
part of the credit for getting Warren and Sue Stevens 
married. 

Both the Hulls and Stevens have lived in Scarsdale for 
years, but it was only one year before their marriage that 
Warren and "Sue met. Eddie Dunn, the radio and TV star, 
another Scarsdale neighbor, arranged that. 

While visiting Eddie one day, Warren said, "Why don't 
you help me find a nice girl?" 

"I know just the person," Eddie's wife said. "Sue 
Stevens." 

"Never met her." 

"We'll have to correct that." 

The next time Eddie threw a "black-eyed pea party," 
in honor of his native state of Texas, he invited both Sue 
and Warren. It wasn't very successful, for Sue stayed 
only five minutes. 

"But it was a beginning, small as it was," Warren re- 
members. 

Sue lived only a stone's throw from Warren. She had 
been a widow for five years, bright, gracious, and so 



pretty that it was hard to believe she had three children, 
Buffy, sixteen, Bud, thirteen, and Sally, nine. Warren 
began to make neighborly calls and at once got along 
wonderfully with her children. 

The courting period, if it could be called such, was 
probably the most unromantic in the annals of love. War- 
ren and Sue were never in a night club together before 
they were married. Not once did they take the forty-five- 
minute drive into fabulous Manhattan to see a show or 
dine and dance. 

Instead of appearing at Sue's door in black tie with an 
orchid in hand, Warren dropped around in his moccasins, 
wearing slacks and a plaid wool shirt. He showed up 
around five and stayed for an hour. 

"I thought of Warren only as a friend and a good 
neighbor," so Sue recalls. 

During the summer, Warren and his boys do a lot of 
swimming. Many times the Stevens children went along 
to the beach. If Sue had no other plans, she joined them. 
Every once in a while, Warren, whose hobby is cooking, 
would drop over and make a meal for the Stevens. He 
generally left in time for chow at his own home. 

Of course, Sue and Warren did (Continued on page 70) 



53 




o 



RPHAN JOHN DALY VOWED 



The moment we saw that house, we knew it was our home. 



5' 



By MRS. JOHN DALY 



To us Dalys the family is all -important, and it seems altogether 
fitting that John's favorite song should be "You'll Never Walk Alone." 

Each of us leads a distinct individual life — even our youngest, 
Buncy, who at seven has a definite personality of her own — but we "walk 
together" in family love and sharing, which is the way we hope it 
will be for many years to come. 

As a newsman and radio -television commentator and moderator, my 
husband's interests take in the whole range of national and international 
affairs, and his life must necessarily extend far beyond the home circle, 
no matter how close he remains to it in spirit. I, of course, am first 
and foremost a homemaker, engrossed with domestic problems and the 
happiness of my family. Our older boy, John Neal, fourteen, is 
planning an engineering career, probably in stime phase of aeronautics. 
John Charles, eleven-and-a-half, is mad about planes, but he has 
political ambitions. In fact, he has (Continued on page 106) 

John Daly is seen on CBS- TV: It's News to Me, Fri., 9:30 P.M., for Instant Sanka, 
and What's My Line?, Sun., 10:30 P.M., for Stopette. He is also seen on America's 
Town Meeting, Sun., 6:30 P.M., ABC-TV, and World News, M-F, 7 P.M., WJZ-TV. He is 
heard on This Week Around the World, Sun., 3 P.M., ABC (except WJZ). All times EDT. 

In our household, "to each his (or her) own" hobby! Young Buncy loves her dolls, and I enjoy them, 
too. The, boys and their friends practice basketball. For John, it's golf — when he finds the time. 



H 




-*• 



-■:, 



Well never walk alone 



HIS HOME WOULD BE A CASTLE AND EVERYONE IN IT, A KING 




There's more than one "John Daly" in our family! Hence, reading from the left: John Charles, Junior; 
Margaret (myself); Buncy (on the floor); John Charles, Senior; and John Neal (leaning on the piano). 



55 



*t" "!!■ :"'--■ 





Orphan john daly vowed 



The moment we sow that house, we knew it was our home. 



By MRS. JOHN DALY 



To us Dalys the family is all-important, ^ 't seems altogether 
fitting that John's favorite song should be "You'll Never Walk Alone. 
Each of us leads a distinct individual life-even our youngest, 
Buncy, who at seven has a definite personality of her own-but we walk 
together" in family love and sharing, which is the way we hope it 
will be for many years to come. 

As a newsman and radio-television commentator and moderator, my 
husband's interests take in the whole range of national and international 
affairs, and his life must necessarily extend far beyond the home circle, 
no matter how close he remains to it in spirit. I, of course, am first 
and foremost a homemaker, engrossed with domestic problems and the 
happiness of my family. Our older boy, John Neal, fourteen, is 
planning an engineering career, probably in same phase of aeronautics. 
John Charles, eleven-and-a-half, is mad about planes, but he has 
political ambitions. In fact, he has (Continued on page 106) 



We'll never walk alone 

HIS HOME WOULD BE A CASTLE AND EVERYONE IN IT, A KING 



|„l„, Daly is Been on CBS-TV: It's News to Me, Fri., 9:30 P.M.. for Instant Sanka, 
and what's My Lure?, Sun.. 10:30 P.M., for Stopettc. He is also seen on America s 
Town Meetine, Sun,, 6:30 P.M., ABC-TV, and World News. M-F, 7 P.M., WJZ-TV. He is 
heard .... Thii Week Around tht World, Sun., 3 P.M., ABC (except WJZ). All times EDT. 

In our household, "to each his (or her] own" hobby! Young Buncy loves her dolls, and I enjoy them, 
too. The. boys and their friends practice basketball. For John, it's golf— when he finds the time. 





n i " ■ r„mllvl Hence reading from the left: John Charles, Junior: 

There's more than one "John Daly in our famdy! Hence, reaa g 
Margaret (myself): Buncy (on the floor): John Charles, Senior: and John Neal [leo g 



SECOND 
HONEYMOON 




If Betty Wragge Brooke had been playing the part 
of Peggy Young in Pepper Young's Family, in 
her most ecstatic moments she couldn't have had 
a happier grin on her face or more bounce to her 
voice than when her husband, Walter, told her he'd 
at last arranged his television acting schedule to 
include a two-week summer vacation. Betty and 
Walter's honeymoon the winter before had been spent 
in the Pocono Mountains and Betty had since dreamed 
of a second honeymoon by the seashore where she 
and Walter could spend hours together in the warm 
sun. They rented a small cottage at Nantucket on 
the island of the same name off the coast of Massa- 
chusetts — a cottage without a telephone, just in case 
any of the radio or TV people should change their 




minds about wanting them back for work. They 
packed a wardrobe consisting of several bathing suits, 
several pairs of shorts, one dress-up outfit, beach 
shoes and sun glasses. Highlight of their trip was a 
bicycle trip from Nantucket to the romantic coast 
town of Siasconset on the other side of the windswept 
island. Planning a vacation is like anything else in 
married life, Betty maintains. It doesn't much matter 
how you spend your time as long as you are just 
enjoying being together. 



Betty Wragge is heard in Pepper Young's Family, M-F, at 
3:30 P.M. EDT, on NBC; sponsored by Procter & Gamble for 
Camay. Walter Brooke is seen in One Man's Family, Sat., 
7:30 P.M. EDT, NBC-TV; sponsored by Miles Laboratories^ 




Nantucket suited Betty and Walter perfectly. Its 
only connection with the workaday world was by boat! 



Cycling to 'Sconset, they met old friends — producer 
Richard Clemmer, designer John Di lorio (in rear). 



J 



UST ASK BETTY WRAGGE AND HER HUSBAND, WALTER BROOKE 





I 

rftJil 



i 



56 



fiUfli/tfoK^Cwbfc^ 



SECOND 
HONEYMOON 




r 



IT Betty Wragge Brooke had been playing the pat 
of Peggy Young in Pepper Young s Family in 
her mosi ecstatic moments she couldn t have had 

er grin on her face or more bounce to her 

! , ,l,an when her husband, Walter, told her he d 

.,, | :i ,i arranged his television acting schedule to 
delude S two-week summer vacation. Betty ana 
Walter's honeymoon the winter before had been spent 
In (he Pocono Mountains and Betty had since dreamed 
,,l B :econd honeymoon by the seashore where she 
and Walter could spend hours together in the warm 
.,„, They rented a small cottage at Nantucket on 
the Island of the same name off the coast of Massa- 
, htl etts -a cottage without a telephone, just in case 
,,„, of the radio or TV people should change their 



minds about wanting them back for work. They 
packed a wardrobe consisting of several bathing suits, 
several pairs of shorts, one dress-up outfit, beach 
shoes and sun glasses. Highlight of their trip was a 
bicycle trip from Nantucket to the romantic coast 
town of Siasconset on the other side of the windswept 
island. Planning a vacation is like anything else in 
married life, Betty maintains. It doesn't much matter 
how you spend your time as long as you are just 
enjoying being together. 



Betty Wragge is heard in Pepper Young's Family, M-F, at 
3-30 P.M. EDT, on NBC; sponsored by Procter & Gaml.le for 
Camay. Waller Brooke is seen in One Man's Family, Sal., 
7-30 P.M. EDT, NBC-TV; sponsored by Miles Laboratories. 



Nantucket suited Betty and Walter perfectly. Its 
only connection with the workaday world was by boat! 



Cycling to 'Sconset, they met old friends— producer 
Richard Clemmer, designer John Di lorio (in reor|. 



J 



UST ASK BETTY WRAGGE AND 





brinei 




The four Young daughters have 
quite a time with Dad, trying to prove 




A father's just a human. This Bob Young's 
wife ; Betty, knows. So do his daughters 
Kathleen, Barbara and winsome Betty Lou. 



Father doesn't always "know best" 



By FREDDA DUDLEY 



The sensible attitude of Bob's two oldest daughters 
made Bob active in national safe-driving campaigns. 




Robert Young, radio father par excellence 
and real-life parent of four beautiful 
daughters, was playing an ardent al- 
though ill-starred game of golf one afternoon. 

His opponent was Mrs. Young, and their 
gallery consisted of daughter Betty Lou, aged 
eight. 

It was one of those days when Bob's clubs, 
which he describes wryly as having built-in 
slices, were behaving oddly. Mr. Young was 
finally driven to expressing himself strongly 
on the idiocy of golf club manufacturers who 
lack the sense to cross a slicing club with a 
hooking club in order to breed an instrument 
which would automatically drive a golf ball 
where you intended it to go. 

He also mentioned (unfavorably) the breeze, 
the length of the grass, the extent of moisture 
in same, and other crosses borne by the inno- 
cent golfer. 

At this point, Betty Lou — who had been 
playing her own game in what she seemed to 
feel was a satisfactory manner — approached 
her mother to ask, "Does Daddy really know 
how to play right?" 

Mrs. Young allowed as how he did. 

"Then why doesn't he do it?" demanded 
Betty Lou. 

This simple query illustrates, as sharply as 
any example could, the handicaps imposed 
upon a parent by his professional status as 
wiseacre. In the radio show, Father Knows 
Best, Robert Young is one of those genial, 
resourceful figments (Continued on page 96) 

Robert \oung is heard in Father Knows Best. 
Thursdays, at 8 P.M. EDT, over NBC network! 



59 



the SECOND Mrs. BURTON 



. 




1 Terry stood, uncertain and alone, feeling like a stranger at her own husband's bedside. Stan was so ill — perhaps he 
would never walk again! He needed all the medical skill his mother's money could buy, and Terry was grateful for what 
Mother Burton had done. But there was hostility in every glance the older woman gave her unwanted daughter-in-law. 



L 



60 



a woman wants to be needed 



TERRY FACES "THE OTHER WOMAN" AND HER MOTHER-IN-LAW 
IN HER DESPERATE STRUGGLE TO SAVE HER MARRIAGE 



Riding back to Dickston from New York, Terry's thoughts 
matched the gloomy day she could see from the train 
window. Terry- felt battered and torn by the events 
that had transpired during the past few months. Stan's 
sudden illness hadn't really been the start of it all — but it 
had brought to the surface all the antagonisms, all the 
currents that had been touching Terry's life. In a way, 
Terry was grateful to Mother Burton for all she'd done. 
When Stan had been stricken with his heart attack, it was 
Mother Burton who had refused to let him go to the hos- 
pital or even to his own home, instead insisting upon turn- 
ing Burton Towers into a complete hospital with nurses 
around-the-clock. Then Stan's illness took a sudden turn 
for the worse, when a bloodclot settled at the juncture of 
the nerves which controlled action in his lower limbs. 
Certainly then, Mother Burton's financial resources were 
more necessary than ever for treatment and cure. 

Yes, Terry was grateful for those funds, but at the same 
time for months now she had felt that some semblance 
of independence should be maintained. In spite of Mother 
Burton's ridicule, she had managed all right, especially 
when she started working in the store herself. Terry hadn't 
realized, nor did she now, that Michael Dal ton had been 



2 Terry wanted to do a good job in the store. Michael 
Dalton was "helping," but she didn't guess he was really 
just helping himself — to a share of the daily receipts. 



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3 In her zeal to show a better sales profit, she 
arranged an exciting window display — unwittingly 
using a spotlight which was dangerously defective. 



See Next Page 



61 





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4 Sparked by the defective spotlight, the store burned to the ground — and Terry could only blame herself for the loss. 



milking the store's receipts in order to provide himself 
with money to entertain and pay court to Marcia Kirk- 
land, Stan's sister, so that eventually he could marry 
Marcia and lay his hands on the Burton money. Terry 
would have no way of knowing this now, for, in her zeal 
to make the store a success, Terry had unwittingly 
brought about its end. In her mind's eye she could still 
picture the wonderful window display she'd arranged, 
carefully placing the spotlights so that the greatest value 
was gotten from the merchandise. And then the horror, 
later that night, when she realized she had been the cause 
of the store's burning to the ground. The spotlight she'd 
used had a defective wire. In the days that followed, 



Pictured here, us on the air, are: 

Terry Burton Patsy Campbell 

Stan Burton Dwight Weist 

Mother Burton Ethel Owen 

Marcia Kirkland Alice Frost 

Michael Dalton Nat Polen 

Karen Sinclair Cathleen Cordell 

Page Sandry Larry Fletcher 

The Second Mrs. Burton is heard M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, CBS; 
sponsor, General Foods for Swansdown and Maxwell House. 



Terry found herself turning in desperation to Page San- 
dry, the theatrical producer in New York who had been 
so impressed with her costume designs the summer be- 
fore. Stan didn't much care whether she took the job 
Page offered her or not. In fact, these days Stan didn't 
much care what happened to anyone. Terry thought back 
on all the influences that had come to bear on Stan's life 
and on her own. Besides Mother Burton, there was Karen 
Sinclair, friendly, reassuring with her daily contact with 
Stan, the one person who seemed to be able to keep up 
Stan's flagging spirits. 

And then, too, there was Page. The more Terry worked 
with him, the more apparent it had become that Page 
was in love with her. An attractive and worldly man in 
his forties, Page had been showing Terry all the consid- 
eration and thoughtfulness Stan rarely did. Leaning back 
against the car seat, Terry found herself deliberately 
toying with the idea of suddenly having the burdens -and 
responsibilities of life taken from her. And then, with 
equal sharpness, she realized her disloyalty to Stan in her 
thoughts. Her discovery a few nights before that Karen, 
taking her cue from Mother Burton, is convincing Stan 
that he will never walk again, has made Terry realize 
that she must fight, not just for Stan's love, but for his 
health and his very existence as a normal man. Terry 
sighed. Yes, the dream of Page Sandry caring for her, 
protecting her, was only a dream. For a woman goes 
where she is needed — for, above all, Terry's heart whis- 
pered, a woman wants to be needed. 







5 There was a purpose behind Michael's thefts from 
the store. The extra cash helped to finance his ardent 
courtship of Stan Burton's sister, Marcia Kirkland. 




7 Innocently pleased by Karen's "kindness" to Stan, 
Terry only thought what good care he would get if she 
left to take the iob she'd been offered in New York. 




6 Michael had a partner in the devious plot to marry 
into the Burton family fortune. Pretty Karen Sinclair 
also had a clever scheme to win Stan away from Terry! 



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8 Sharp suspicion struck Terry, as she said goodbye 
and started out the door. Could her sudden instinct be 
right — was Karen really trying to poison Stan's mind? 




9 But New York still beckoned. Page Sandry, charming 
and successful thealrical producer, had shown such an 
interest in her costume designs — and in Terry herself. 




10 Should she go — or stay? Doesn't every woman have a 
right to security, devotion, and a place all her own — a 
place in the heart of some man who truly needs her? fi „ 



RADIO -TV 




J«RHUi» 



1 



HARD-ridin' straight-shootin', 
tough-fightin', soft-talkin' gun- 
slinger, Jack Mahoney, is TV's 
newest Western star, better known 
to his fans as the Range Rider. 

Ten years ago, Jack went out to 
Hollywood bent on becoming a 
movie actor. He thought it would 
be a lead-pipe cinch to land an 
acting job. But, believe it or not, 
the six-foot-four two-hundred- 
pounder got plumb scared in front 
of the camera, couldn't mumble a 
line of dialogue, much less make 
any gestures. Jack was kind of 
discouraged at that point, and 
found that the only jobs he could 
get were stunt parts for other 
actors less athletic than Mahoney. 

Jack was an expert rider and 
swimmer, so Hollywood put him to 
work doing difficult scenes for the 
stars. He felt right at home doing 



film stunts, because in his native 
Davenport, Iowa, Jack had been 
an all-around athlete ever since he 
climbed his first tree. Matter of 
fact, Jack had spent so much time 
at athletics that he was forced to 
drop out of his pre-medical course 
at college — games' were taking too 
much of the time he should have 
been plugging away at books. 

When Gene Autry first saw Jack, 
he figured the lean Iowan would 
be a natural for the character, 
Range Rider — especially since TV 
budgets make it necessary for the 
leading man to do all . his own 
stunts. By this time, Jack had over- 
come his fear of the camera and, 
when Gene asked him to try out for 
the part, he came through better 
than he ever dreamed of doing ten 
years before. 

He is still a single man. 




■ 



64 



[01 {6us4i 



Lucy Knoch, currently playing 
straight girl to Red Skelton on 
TV, is the kind of girl things just 
happen to. The lovely blue-eyed 
blonde from Nashville, Tennessee, 
is always in the right place at the 
right time. 

The first right place Lucy went 
to was Tucson, Arizona. She and 
her sister visited friends there just 
after Lucy was graduated from 
high school. It was the right time, 
because actress Paulette Goddard 
was in Tucson then, too. Through 
mutual friends, Lucy met the film 
star, who invited the sisters to 
come on a grand tour of Paramount 
studios if they ever stopped in 
Hollywood. 

Well, Lucy managed to get out 
film-capital way, and sure enough 
found a note from Paulette at the 
studio instructing the powers that 



be to give Lucy a "grand tour." 
Once again Lucy just happened to 
meet up with a company execu- 
tive, who just happened to notice 
how pretty she was, and the next 
thing she knew, Lucy Knoch was 
taking, a screen test. 

The screen test was successful 
and Paramount signed her, turn- 
ing Lucy's brief visit into a per- 
manent stay. The yqung actress 
credits Hollywood with teaching 
her how to work before cameras, 
use make-up, and wardrobe tricks 
— a great help to her in TV. After 
completing her first picture, Lucy 
was feeling kind of blue, and con- 
sidered going back home. But, at 
that moment, Red Skelton and his 
manager just happened to see Lucy 
sitting in a restaurant. They needed 
a pretty girl to dress up Red's TV 
show. Lucy got the job. 



On one of Max Reinhardt's 
trips to Budapest, Hungary, 
the famous producer-director dis- 
covered a new young actress. Her 
name was Lili Darvas. Up to the 
time of their meeting, Lili had been 
working hard to perfect her acting 
technique, but never dreamed that 
the great Reinhardt, himself, would 
be so impressed that he would en- 
gage her for his company in Vienna 
and Berlin. 

Lili, who was both beautiful and 
talented — a happy combination in 
the theatre — left her native land, 
and went to Vienna with Rein- 
hardt. There she studied hard, 
spending much of her time learn- 
ing German. From the beginning, 
the director knew he had a star in 
Lili. It wasn't long before she was 
the crown princess of the com- 
pany. 



Europe, in those days, was in its 
theatrical heyday, and Lili toured 
the continent, playing regularly at 
the Salzburg festivals. The great 
Ferenc Molnar wrote plays es- 
pecially for her, and eventually 
Lili became Mrs. Molnar. 

During March, 1938, Adolf Hit- 
ler marched into Vienna while Lili 
was playing an engagement there. 
The Molnar s fled to America. Here 
they forged a new life for them- 
selves. Lili became a familiar ac- 
tress on the stage of her adopted 
country, appearing in many Broad- 
way productions. More recently, 
she has been acclaimed by critics 
for performances on TV's top 
dramas. 

On radio, Lili is currently heard 
as Hannah on Hilltop House, and 
acts on several other daytime ser- 
ial programs. 




I'k dofoiol 



1A#hen Meredith Willson hopped 
™~ to the piano at the age of 
seven back in Mason City, Iowa, 
his mother's immediate reaction 
was: "There are too many pianists 
in this town." So Meredith, always 
agreeable, took to the flute. 

As Mason City's . one and only 
flutist, Willson was in great de- 
mand. He was immediately grabbed 
up by the high school band. After 
graduation, Meredith came to New 
York, where he studied at the 
Damrosch Institute of Musical Art. 
While still there, he became a 
member of John Philip Sousa's 
famous band, and played and stud- 
ied with Sousa for three years. 

Next he joined Dr. Hugo Reisen- 
feld at New York's Rialto Theater. 
During his two years with the 
doctor, the young flutist composed 
his first sei'ious work, "Parade 



Fantastique." In 1924 the work 
was premiered, and in the same 
year Meredith joined the New 
York Philharmonic Orchestra. He 
filled the first flutist's chair for five 
years before resigning and turn- 
ing to radio. 

Meredith Willson has the kind of 
personality which appeals to long- 
hairs and short-hairs alike. Always 
a serious musician, Meredith still 
manages to give his audiences the 
feeling that he's just having a lot 
of fun. His programs are usually 
a combination of the best in both 
classical and popular music. He 
spoofs the old masters affection- 
ately — and somehow you know 
they wouldn't mind at all. 

With his radio chores going full 
blast, Meredith still finds time to 
compose and do personal appear- 
ances, too. 




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65 



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God 



ave me 



ANOTHER CHANCE 



73 




Now Walter's life is full of sunbeams — like Jennifer, his niece. 



The one thing Walter O'Keefe wanted was to stand on his own feet. 
Then the doctors told him, "Polio. . . ." 



By MAXINE ARNOLD 



With anxious, questioning eyes, Walter 
O'Keefe watched the doctor com- 
plete his examination. Watched him 
straighten up slowly, then hesitate, as 
though groping for some way to soften the 
tragic words he knew he must speak. 

"Young man," he began slowly, "I'm go- 
ing to say something which will shock you. 
And you're probably not going to believe 

me " 

Then he told him. And for. a few horrified 



moments — Walter couldn't believe him. To 
this good-looking, vigorous, twenty-four- 
year-old ex-Marine, three years out of 
Notre Dame and already on his way to a 
successful business career, the words had 
a paralyzing impact. He felt his whole 
world crashing down on him — and on a leg 
which couldn't feel, which might never feel 
again. And he asked himself, as so many 
others had before him, as so many others 
will again, "What (Continued on page 72) 



Walter O'Keefe emcees Double Or Nothing, M-F, 10:30 A.M. EDT, over NBC, for the Campbell Soup Co. 



66 



The Home Vaughn 
Picked Up for a Song 

(Continued from page 49 ) 
adjoins the Monroes' 33,000 square feet of 
lawn. 

"If their eighteenth hole weren't so 
close to our dining-room window," laughs 
Marian, "I wonder if Vaughn would be so 
eager to hurry home every moment he's 
not working!" 

For a last-minute inspection, she glances 
around the patio — which Vaughn built of 
flagstone, complete with barbecue equip- 
ment — then hurries indoors to see, quite 
literally "what's cooking." They're expect- 
ing company for dinner, and the beef is 
roasting fragrantly. The Monroes don't 
have as many chances for home entertain- 
ing as they'd like, so when Vaughn's there 
they make an occasion of it. 

Actually, practically anything is the oc- 
casion for a party with the Monroes, com- 
plete with paper cloth, fancy decorations 
and gifts from the girls. Candy (short for 
Candace), ten, and Christy (short for 
Christina), seven, are allowed fifty cents 
each for such gifts and shop diligently in 
the local five-and-dime for the special 
somethings they always select. One Father's 
Day, Candy gave Vaughn a leatherette 
pad with pencil attached — a pointed re- 
minder of the way he yells for pad and 
pencil when he's on the phone. Chris, 
knowing how her father likes roasted ears 
of corn with his barbecues, gave him a 
pair of corn holders. Even four-footed 
Penny comes in for her fifty cents' worth, 
such as a new kind of soap the girls were 
told would do wonders in keeping flies 
away from her sensitive nose. 

All the Monroes are great on sharing — 
gifts, hobbies, jokes — and their house re- 
veals it clearly. Everything in it is a key 
to the individuality of each member but 
also to their community of interests. An 
open-front cabinet in the living room holds 
the lovely pieces of antique china Marian 
has collected in their travels, and the 
dining room has the many silver pieces 
she's gathered. In the children's room are 
the china horses and dogs the girls are 
accumulating — Vaughn always buys one 
for each on his various trips — and in the 
master's den are the guns he has found 
in out-of-the-way shops. 

Downstairs in the playroom are assorted 
curios bought by the entire family in its 
travels, as well as the girls' record col- 
lection. Even the sides of the stairway 
leading down to the basement are covered 
with framed mementos of Vaughn's career 
— the first sheet music he ever recorded, 
covers of the first trade magazines which 
mentioned him, all the landmarks of his 
progress which could be kept in permanent 
form — the family calls it "Monroe's Alley." 

Because the children are being raised as 
average young girls, they are allowed a 
fair amount of freedom of expression. They 
joke about their parents' foibles much as 
Vaughn and Marian kid them — and each 
other — about some of their traits. Con- 
versation is usually lighthearted banter. 
Vaughn says the reason Marian loves him 
is because he shows such proper apprecia- 
tion for her cooking. She says it's his 
absent-mindedness which keeps her per- 
manently his slave, and she adores it. And 
they both say the only way to describe 
their household decorating scheme is 
"comfortable American!" 

Marian insists that the entire main floor 
is a monotone of gray, but actually it's 
highlighted with many flashes of color and 
the gray tones themselves are blended and 
contrasted with amazing variety. There is 
gray broadloom carpeting from wall to 




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wall on all the floors except the kitchen 
and breakfast nook, gray wallpaper and 
pink ceilings in both the hallway and the 
thirty-foot living room, where the gray 
slipcovers are trimmed with coral. In the 
dining room, it's a gunmetal ceiling and 
gunmetal wallpaper with flowery splashes 
of yellow and red, while the eighteenth- 
century mahogany furniture has chair 
seats of hunter green leather. 

In the breakfast nook, gray is the back- 
ground of a splashy country-style wall- 
paper picturing green trees and orange 
carts as color relief for the ebony-finished 
table and chairs painted by Marian and 
Vaughn. Even a small powder room goes 
gray in effect with silver gazelles on lip- 
stick-red wallpaper. The only room on the 
main floor which entirely eliminates the 
gray motif is the big kitchen, which is 
truly colorful with its yellow tile walls, 
brick-red ceiling and matching linoleum. 



When the Monroes moved into the house, 
in 1948, they discarded all the old kitchen 
equipment and put in everything electrical. 
But more noticeable than the gleaming 
cabinets — or even the long counter run- 
ning across one wall for quick snacks — is a 
huge blackboard facing the inside door- 
way. There all grocery orders, day-by-day 
reminders, phone calls and loving messages 
are noted. The children particularly like 
it for rainy- day drawing. And who is the 
main subject for .their art work? Not 
Vaughn — their beautiful dog, Penny! 

There are wood-burning fireplaces in all 
the main rooms, including the master bed- 
room upstairs. Above the one in the living 
room are two oil paintings of the children, 
done when each was a year and a half old. 
Above the one in the master bedroom 
hangs a large photograph of Vaughn and 
his favorite cigarette. Here Marian has 
acceded to masculine taste by having the 
walls papered in white with a blue spruce 
design, and blue carpeting on the floor. 

"We aren't waiting until the girls have 
romances to be relegated to the back par- 
lor," Vaughn laughs, pointing to the fur- 
niture arranged in front of the upstairs 
fireplace. 

"You bet we aren't!" Marian agrees. "We 
decided that a love seat . . ." here Vaughn 
interrupts to point out that it's large 
enough to actually seat two, "an up- 
holstered chair with ottoman and a coffee 
table would make a good spot to run to 
when Candy and Chris start entertaining 
their beaux." 

"But it sure gets used now," Vaughn 
explains. "You should see how many cold 
winter mornings the girls plug in the 
electric coffee maker and bring up the 
toaster and fixings for a light breakfast, 
so we can talk about the night or week 
I've been away. It sure beats getting up 
early to eat downstairs." 

When Marian and Vaughn talk about 
the girls, it's easy to see they consider the 
long hard years behind them well worth 
the struggle. Marian, as Vaughn's high- 
school sweetheart, shared all his struggles. 
Born in Akron, Ohio, on October 7, 1911, 
Vaughn finally settled in Jeannette, Penn- 
sylvania, where Marian lived. For quite a 
while he veered between trumpet playing 
and vocal work, finally gave up the idea 
of concert singing to work with orchestras. 
In addition to his trumpet playing, he 
served as driver of the instrument truck 
and treasurer of the band. Finally, a couple 
of music business greats, Jack Marshard 
and Willard, Alexander — the former is now 
a partner with Vaughn in all his enter- 
prises, the latter is the present band's 
booking manager — decided that Vaughn 
could be a singing bandleader personality 
and the present Monroe organization was 



born, with results we all know so well. 

From 1940 until 1945, things were touch 
and go. Vaughn's weekly income was 
small and Marian, not married too long, 
suddenly found herself traveling with the 
band in the capacity of bookkeeper and 
general assistant. Then without warning, 
RCA Victor had Vaughn record "There, 
I've Said It Again," and with nobody quite 
understanding why, it became a national 
sensation, selling a million and a quarter 
discs. He followed this with many other 
hits — the most recent, "Tenderly," "Moun- 
tain Laurel" and "Lady Love." 

Vaughn is the first to insist that Marian's 
fortitude has been his strength. Marian is 
no shy little wallflower hiding behind her 
big man. She's just a couple of inches 
shorter than Vaughn, with a slender figure. 
She wears clothes well — preferring casual 
ones — but her own grooming takes second 
place to worries about him and the chil- 
dren. She often knits herself dresses that 
other women envy, although she limits the 
use of their sewing machine to curtains 
and draperies for the house, feeling her 
knack with a needle is strictly on the 
knitting side. Vaughn's many slip-over 
sweaters and matching socks are products 
of Marian's industry during train, bus or 
plane rides; and the children boast a 
supply of sweaters as varied as their 
father's repertoire of songs. 

What might make another man sensitive 
is amusing to Vaughn. His inability to 
manage his personal finances, for one thing. 
Marian kids him about the time he and 
his co-pilot flew in Vaughn's private air- 
plane to New York and had to wait at the 
field until Marian arrived with the seven- 
teen-dollar landing fee. Vaughn gets a 
sizable allowance, but often forgets to take 
it with him, or lends it to someone else. 
One time on the road he needed a check 
cashed, walked into a bar and showed 
his identification. Unfortunately, he needed 
a shave and was wearing his oldest clothes, 
as he usually does while driving. The bar- 
tender said: "Aw right. If you're Vaughn 
Monroe, sing 'Ballerina,' brother." 

Vaughn warbled a few notes. Then the 
bartender put a nickel in the jukebox. The 
same vocal tones came out. Without an- 
other word, he cashed Vaughn's check. For 
once, Vaughn didn't mind having to sing 
for his supper. Without that money, he'd 
have had a tough time eating along the 
road. 

Vaughn has a number of hobbies — pipe- 
collecting, photography, motorcycling, fly- 
ing — but samples of his greatest are little 
seen at home. That's his wood-working, 
for when he does his cabinet-making, it's 
usually as a present for a friend. What 
cabinets and such Marian needs often can't 
wait for Vaughn's free time, so they're 
bought or made elsewhere. One thing he 
did manage, however, was to build the 
inset cabinets in the basement playroom, 
which not only double as seats but hold all 
the toys or equipment used for indoor 
recreation. 

The basement room where Vaughn does 
his wood-working has an invisible keep- 
out sign for everyone, except by special 
invitation. In it is as much equipment as 
you'd find in the finest cabinet shop any- 
where — a bulwark, Marian claims, against 
the time when Vaughn may no longer care 
to sing or go on band-tooting one-night 
stands. Vaughn's delight in new equipment 
for the shop, however, sometimes takes 
comical turns. Marian recalls the time 
she asked Vaughn to sharpen a pencil for 
her. Instead of using something easy, he 
insisted on demonstrating how this could 
be accomplished with his newest lathe. Two 
boxes of pencils later, he triumphantly 
demonstrated a perfect point. 

The two girls attend Tenacre School in 



Wellesley, a primary school which is part 
of the Dana Hall School. A school bus 
calls for them at eight each morning — 
with Marian to see them off. This is because 
Candy will eat a good breakfast, without 
supervision, but Christy likes to be coaxed. 
Marian's idea of delight has nothing to 
do with food. It's the chance to slip on one 
of the many negligees Vaughn has per- 
sonally selected for her on his travels. He 
feels slighted if she doesn't wear his gifts, 
so she makes sure to have a different one 
on each time they can spend an evening 
alone. She wishes his memory were as 
good when it comes to putting on the 
clothes he should wear for an evening on 
the bandstand. Usually she packs a suit- 
case for him, but one particular evening 
he dressed to take her to dinner, then 
brought her home early and she decided 
that the outfit he was wearing was fine for 
his band assignment that night, at a school 
dance not too many miles away. She kissed 
him good night and went upstairs. Coming 
down a few moments later, she noticed his 
entire outfit draped on a living-room chair. 
He had absent-mindedly changed into his 
driving clothes and forgotten to pack the 
other things. She had to get a "ham" oper- 
ator of a short-wave sending set to broad- 
cast an appeal to Vaughn to please come 
home for his clothes. Luckily, the set in 
the car was working and Vaughn heard 
the message in time. 



One thing Vaughn never forgets, how- 
ever, is the family. They do many things 
together such as ice-skating and skiing in 
the winter, tennis and barbecuing and 
rides on his motorcycle in the summer. He 
manages to get in a round of golf once a 
week, as a rule, and they have musical 
family evenings when he's not on the road. 
The children are his special delight, main- 
ly because they are each so individual. 
Christina, a true blonde, looks like an 
angel — but acts like a fiend, her mother 
observes. Vaughn adds, "She looks like me, 
so I don't know where the angel part 
comes in. . . ." Candace resembles her 
mother, with ash-blonde hair and what 
Marian describes as the stubbornness and 
determination of her mom and the charm 
of her pop. This shuts up Vaughn's jibes 
entirely. He insists if there are any wings 
around they're not on Pop — they're on 
Mom! 

Give the girls a chance to be around 
Vaughn and they're in seventh heaven. 
He'll never forget how long Candy waited 
to be taken to The Meadows, the restaurant 
Vaughn owns in Framingham, Massa- 
chusetts, to dance with her father after 
dinner. The night he finally took her, some 
of her dessert accidentally fell in her lap. 
She was so ashamed of her spoiled dress 
that she insisted on going home without 
the dance. She didn't want to disgrace 
Daddy. 

This business of being children of a 
famous bandleader has in no way gone to 
the girls' heads, however. Marian and 
Vaughn have explained to them that sing- 
ing and leading a band are jobs, just like 
the jobs their friends' fathers have. It's 
taught them to respect Vaughn as a hard 
worker but not to boast about him to im- 
prove their own social positions. 

Any visit with the Vaughn Monroes is 
filled with their reminiscences, their family 
jokes and their closeness. To his wife and 
daughters, Vaughn isn't just a man who's 
built up a two-million-dollar business 
around himself. Even if he were still only 
a trumpet-tootling musician, he'd have . 
"arrived" as far as his family's concerned. 
Because to them — and to everyone who's 
met him — there's only one way to describe 
Monroe . . . he's simply Vaughnderful! 

69 



Warren Hull Strikes It Rich! 



(Continued from page 53) 
a lot of talking. They covered most adult 
topics, but they might discuss what he 
planned that evening for his date (not 
with Sue) and she might describe a party 
she had attended the night before (not 
with Warren). 

"There wasn't any courting," Warren 
notes: "Actually, we didn't have any idea 
of where we were headed." 

His sons believed differently. 

"Why don't you take your own advice?" 
they asked him. 

Warren had discussed marriage with 
them. As a man who has lived in the 
movie colony, worked with the Broadway 
crowd in musical shows and traveled 
widely in the famous Vox Pop radio show, 
he knew from observation and experience 
that marriage with all of its ramifications 
is not to be taken lightly. 
,. "When you're thinking of marrying, look 
for a woman who is beautiful inside," he 
had counseled. "Physical beauty is strictly 
a bonus." 

"Mrs. Stevens has all the qualifications," 
they noted, "plus the bonus." 

"I don't deny that," Warren said, "but 
we're just good friends." 

But the Hull boys take seriously the job 
of bringing up father. Warren had always 
talked freely with them. They met the 
women he knew socially. They discussed 
his "dishes," as they called them, and the 
boys made no bones about their admiration 
for Sue. 

"And then one day — I don't know how, 
when or why — Warren and I knew we 
were in love and wanted to get married," 
Sue says. "We decided to tell Warren's 
son John first, since he was the oldest." 
John Hull, twenty-one, now a Journalist 
Seaman in the Navy, grinned at the news. 

"Maybe we'll get married in a year or 
so," Sue concludedr 

John didn't like that. 

"Paul and George and I have been put- 
ting up with this dillydallying long 
enough," he said. "Another year would be 
too hard on us. How about getting hitched 
next week?" 

Warren and Sue thought this over. Ex- 
actly what were they wasting a year for? 
There was really no obstacle. They had 
only one problem to solve: Whose house 
to live in? And that was easy. The answer 
was Sue's house, since hers was the larger. 
The following Saturday, November 3, 1951, 
was set for the wedding. 

"We chose Saturday for it was the one 



day all the children could make it," Sue 
says. "We not only wanted them to know 
and approve of the marriage but to be at 
the ceremony." 

They were married at Warren's sister's 
home in Connecticut and had less than a 
twenty-four-hour honeymoon. Sunday 
morning they returned, for Warren's son 
had moved in and Sue wanted to make 
sure he didn't feel awkward. 

"The first person I met as we walked in 
was a strange boy," she said. "He turned 
out to be Paul's first house guest. After 
that, I realized I'd never have to worry 
about the boys feeling strange." 

The home is beautiful, a large, Colonial 
house with a deep green lawn in the front 
and an expansive terrace in the back, 
complete with a small summer house, a 
barbecue pit and picnic table. But even 
with four bedrooms, there wasn't much 
chance of anyone getting lonely, with six 
children instead of three, as well as a man 
around the house. Sue's two daughters 
shared one bedroom. Sue converted a guest 
room into a combination social and sleep- 
ing room with a double-decker bunk bed 
and a studio couch — for Warren's sons. 
Bud kept his small room. 

Allotment of space wasn't the biggest 
headache. Warren had a houseful of furni- 
ture and so did Sue. Sue learned quickly 
that Warren was a "saver." He had me- 
mentos that went back thirty years. He 
could reach into a box and pull out his 
original musical score from "My Mary- 
land," dated 1927. 

"You're not giving up anything that's 
important to you," Sue told him. "Some of 
my things will go." 

Warren had furniture dating back for 
three or more generations, pieces which 
had long belonged to the family. These 
came over to Sue's house, along with fine 
steel engravings of his ancestors. 

"Actually, the furnishings are primarily 
Regency and Victorian," Sue notes, "but 
like most homes there is still a little bit 
of everything and it all fits very well." 

The question at the top of their minds, 
of course, was always the children. How 
would they hit it off? How would they 
react to this sudden consolidation? Actual- 
ly, Sue's older daughter, Buffy, was away 
at school and so was George Hull. John 
was just starting his Naval training. 

"Everything ran smoothly in the begin- 
ning," Sue will tell you. "It was the 
Christmas holiday that I feared." 

Not only were all the children to be 



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70 



home but Sue's parents were to come. That 
made a total of ten people who would be 
living together for the first time. 

John, arriving home in uniform, still 
flushed with pride at helping to bring the 
newlyweds together, looked the situation 
over and said, "We have to get organized, 
that's all." 

As self-appointed chairman, he tackled 
the biggest problem first: Ten people 
versus two bathrooms. He immediately 
drew up a schedule. The boys would al- 
leviate the situation to some extent by 
doing their shaving in the powder room 
downstairs. Parents got their choice of 
hours and the children came before and 
after. The women, in gallant acknowledg- 
ment of their fastidiousness, were granted 
the most time for dressing and bathing. 

"These were the superficial things," War- 
ren notes. "Sue made the boys feel at ease 
instantly. From the first day, they were 
calling her 'Mom' and asking her advice." 

They were just a little concerned with 
Buffy, at sixteen, coming home from school 
to live with her newly-acquired older and 
rather glamorous brothers. The boys, how- 
ever, refused to be shy. They insisted on 
discussing her dates just as they would 
have if they'd lived together for years. 
Sue's success in making the boys feel at 
ease worked fine both ways. 

Sue has quite definite ideas about rais- 
ing children. Intelligent discipline, she 
feels, is important. It teaches moderation 
and consideration, a respect for the rights 
of others. But she knpws that a child's 
security is found in genuine love. The 
effortless adjustment of her children to 
the new family proved they had that 
security. 

Warren's feelings about Buffy and Sally 
are perhaps a lot deeper than even the 
girls realize. There was an incident on 
Strike It Rich one morning which illus- 
trates this. 

Walt Framer, producer of the program, 
was standing offstage as Warren inter- 
viewed an orphan. The girl was alone and 
penniless, but she explained that she didn't 
care about making a lot of money on the 
show. 

"All I want," she said, "is the oppor- 
tunity to do something for myself, to find 
my own way." 

Warren choked up as he talked to her. 
Afterwards, he rushed off the stage, tears 
welling from his eyes. 

"You know, Walt," he said, "I was think- 
ing all of the time I was out there that 
she could have been the daughter I never 
had." 

Warren has daughters now, and he 
couldn't want for better. Sally, a high- 
spirited nine-year-old, is getting her first 
riding instructions from Warren. Buffy, a 
winsome young lady, has a great trait in 
common with Warren. Sue describes it. 

"They both have empathy. I think it's 
one of the things that has endeared War- 
ren to the audience of Strike It Rich." 

Empathy, defined loosely, is the ability 
to put yourself into another fellow's shoes. 
Buffy's friends know she has this quality. 
They come to her with their problems. 
They talk with her about their ambitions 
and plans. 

"You know, mother," Buffy has told 
Sue. "I feel as if I want to help and, if it's 
a problem, I suffer as much as they do." 

Radio associates see the same quality in 
Warren's make-up. Contestants will talk 
to him when they're so jumbled up inside 
that no one else can get them to tell the 
time of day. They sense that Warren is 
reliving the incident for them. They sense 
the real humility Warren feels. 

Warren's compassion is no act. Being 



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71 



down and out is not uncommon to actors 
and singers, so Warren knows about that. 
And being helpful is not something Warren 
recently learned. The religious tradition 
of his family is based on a pledge to 
tireless improvement of mankind. He tells 
stories of his ancestors not being heroic 
but being helpful. The children know that 
his great-grandmother, called Aunt Han- 
nah — whose picture hangs in the foyer — 
was a frontier midwife and nurse who 
made many long treks through the woods 
to comfort and aid the sick. 

"Some nights when Warren is tired and 
still absorbed with the day's work," Sue 
relates, "I'll find him in the living room 
patiently listening to one of the children 
pour out their problems. He'll sit there for 
an hour, attentive, in spite of the fact 
that he's completely spent." 

Warren puts in business-man hours 
during the week, except Wednesday, when 
he works late. He's in the studio at nine. 
After the show, he goes to his office to 
answer mail and conduct interviews. 

Generally, he can relax in the evening. 
One of his greatest pleasures is cooking 



and this he will do at home or when he 
and Sue visit friends. 

The family has frequent musical eve- 
nings, such as Warren enjoyed as a child. 
In the living room there is a tremendous 
collection of records. When they aren't 
listening and reading, they gather around 
the piano and sing. Sue plays and so do 
Buffy and Paul. Warren plays trumpet — 
not so often these days — but, as you know, 
he has an excellent voice and once sang in 
Broadway musicals. 

Sue and Warren have been in a night 
club since their marriage, but only at the 
insistence of his friends. The moment he 
steps into a smoke-filled club, his eyes 
start to water and he gets restless. They 
prefer visiting with friends and they like 
walking. 

"Weather permitting, we go for a lot of 
walks," Sue says. "Any time. Nights when 
we get home from a party. Sunday after- 
noons. And especially Wednesday nights." 

Wednesday is Warren's roughest day. 
He does the usual morning show on Strike 
It Rich and then there is the nighttime 
edition. He comes home feeling depressed. 



Anyone who has seen or heard the show 
doesn't have to ask why — the tragedies that 
hit some lives are almost unbelievable. Big, 
strong men confess they bawl like babies 
watching the show. They often ask, too, 
how Warren can stand the strain. 

"He just manages to bear up through the 
program," Sue admits. "He takes hours 
afterwards to pull himself together." 

Sue and Warren return to Scarsdale im- 
mediately and take a long walk. And there 
is something about the night, the quiet of 
the streets, the glow of the stars, which 
helps them get back their perspective. And 
they talk. Warren believes in the dignity 
of man and that there's something of God 
in everyone. He knows that people don't 
expect riches. They merely want, like the 
orphan girl, the chance to help themselves. 
' Warren has led a full life. He knows the 
ups and the downs. Now, with Sue and his 
bigger and better family, he has a great 
deal more happiness than ever before. It 
only makes him better able to understand 
what unfortunate people are missing. Yes, 
Warren Hull has struck it rich and, as 
everyone agrees, no one deserves it more. 



"God Gave Me Another Chance" 



(Continued from page 66) 
can a man do . . . without his legs?" 

His thoughts churned over and over— 
and came out nowhere. How could this 
be? He'd been a top athlete and tennis 
champ. He'd worked since he was fourteen 
years old. Always carried his own weight. 
Now he had a great start in the outdoor 
advertising business, covering a great deal 
of territory, and working out of Hartford, 
Connecticut, his home town. This was 
something that happened to other un- 
fortunate persons — too many of them. 
Something one read about in the news- 
papers, read with sympathy — yet secure 
in the knowledge it could never happen 
to you. But it had. 

This couldn't be true. Why, only a few 
days before, he'd been swimming, scissor- 
ing those legs at the seashore. This was a 
busy summer, and he'd taken a short 
vacation trip . . . which was to change the 
whole course of his life and, although he 
had no way of knowing it then, would 
some day take him to a glittering future. 

On the last day of his vacation at New 
London, Connecticut, he'd met a fellow 
who had a red Buick touring car and was 
driving to New Haven. Walter, assuring 
him he was an old hand in that country 
and knew the road well, offered to drive 
him there. He'd arrived strangely chilled, 
and not just from the fog that was closing 
in. The next morning, Sunday — he would 
never forget the day — he'd gone to the 
Taft Hotel coffee shop. He was having his 
first cup of coffee, when his hand began 
shaking. Shaking hard. So hard he spilled 
the coffee all over the front of his light 
summer suit. 

There was, Walter remembered, a train 
leaving for Hartford about that time. He 
managed to make it. Every jolt of the train, 
for some reason, was a staggering shock 
to his stiffening neck, the back of his head. 

He got home, only to find his whole 
family — his father, Michael, his sisters, 
Mary and Teresa, and his brother, Jack — 
had gone away for the weekend. He went 
to a doctor, who told him there was nothing 
seriously wrong with him. "You just have 
an upset stomach," he said. 

But, by the time Walter got home, he 

r was losing his equilibrium. He started to 

M fall down, he caught himself, holding onto 

the couch — and he remembered another 

doctor, an osteopath, he'd known. His left 

leg had begun to bother him — very much. 

72 



Then the osteopath told him. He had in- 
fantile paralysis. Polio. To be specific, 
"Anterior poliomyelitis, from the hip to 
the knee. . . ." 

In St. Francis' hospital, Walter O'Keefe, 
with the help of all that day's science 
could offer — mostly diathermy and rub- 
downs from the osteopath three times a 
week — began his fight for a future that 
seemed so dark. A lonely fight. In the dark 
hours of night, when a man is alone with 
himself and his thoughts, his prayers and 
his God. His father, Michael, with his ready 
Irish wit, was an incurable optimist and 
a great help. So were the Fathers, the 
priests he'd known so long, who visited 
him and exhorted that— above all — he must 
have faith. 

Then one day, he felt life in his left leg. 
From that magic moment, his whole psy- 
chology changed from despair to hope. He 
felt sure he would recover. And, once this 
mental adjustment was made, recovery 
came faster for him — and he started plan- 
ning a future again. As his leg gradually 
began to live again, during the months — 
long months — to wheel chair, to crutches, 
to cane . . . and thereafter ... he was re- 
minded that man's dire need can indeed 
be God's opportunity. That out of tragedy 
often comes triumph. Polio was to prove 
the turning point in Walter O'Keefe's 
whole life — and for the better. . . . 

The long months of recuperation pro- 
vided time for introspective planning for 
the future. To think things out. And to 
realize that his past profession as a travel- 
ing advertising man might prove too stren- 
uous now. He couldn't go running around 
the country on even a half-bum leg. But 
he could walk as far as the proscenium 
of a stage. This he could manage. And it 
wasn't as though he hadn't had some meas- 
ure of experience as an amateur enter- 
tainer. From the age of five, when he'd 
seen his father standing in front of a 
gaslight at the parish socials, singing and 
telling jokes and commanding an audience, 
he'd been agreeably impressed. He'd par- 
ticipated in amateur shows as a kid. He'd 
worked his way through Notre Dame 
entertaining at various civic meetings and 
club functions. 

Then, one day, he found a clipping from 
an old newspaper which cinched his de- 
cision to turn to show business for a 
career. It was from the Worcester (Mas- 
sachusetts) Telegram, written some ten 



years before — magic words he was to re- 
member for all time. A news account 
which announced he'd won the amateur 
contest at the Poli Theatre there, with the 
added prediction from the theatre-owner's 
son, Edward Poli; "If O'Keefe takes up 
the stage for +ris career — his path will be a 
rosy one." 

During the next months, he almost wore 
the clipping out, fingering it. Reading and 
re-reading it. The words had a comfort- 
ing ring. He wrote songs, among them 
ditties like "You Should Hear Me Sing 
When I'm In The Bathroom," worked up 
some patter — and decided to take that path 
which led to show business ... a gamble 
which was to pay off one day on NBC's 
Double Or Nothing. 

When he could walk well enough with a 
cane, Walter went back to Worcester, hav- 
ing decided to put on his first profession- 
al performance there. Upon arrival, he 
went immediately to the newspaper office, 
dug ten years back into the old files, and 
found the issue with the treasured review. 
He took it to the current manager of the 
Poli Theatre, saying, "Back in 1914, Mr. 
Poli's son predicted I'd have a rosy path." 
The manager agreed to put him on that 
Sunday night. "If you click — " he said 
speculatively. Walter went on in the num- 
ber two spot: "Walter O'Keefe — Songs, 
Jokes, and Nifty Sayings." Using his cane, 
and with only a slight limp, he made his 
way to the center of the stage. And he 
clicked. . . . 

As he later clicked on the stage, in night 
clubs, and on radio. And if the path wasn't 
always "rosy," it had its ample recom- 
pense. Twenty-seven years in show busi- 
ness have convinced him that to touch 
another human being's life with laughter, 
to cause a worn face to light up, to pro- 
vide an escape by taking others out of 
their own lives and helping them forget 
for even a few moments their own dis- 
couragements — and perhaps gain new 
strength to meet them — is a job of which 
any man could be proud. 

Today he can be thankful for the tragedy 
which changed his life, which afforded him 
this opportunity. And which enables him 
to help instill hope in the hearts of others 
afflicted with the same dreaded disease. 
To visit the polio-stricken and tell his 
story, saying, "I had it. I whipped it. And 
so — with God's help, your doctor's and 
your own — can you." 









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6:15 6:05 Petite Concert 

6:30 Bill Stern 

6:45 Three Star Extra 



7:00 Richard Harkness 

7:15 The Playboys 

7:30 News of the World 

7:45 One Man's Family 



Local Programs 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
Mutual Newsreel 



9:00 
9:05 
9:30 
9:45 



Halls of Ivy 
Great Gildersleeve 



Groucho Marx. You 

Bet Your Life 
Big Story 



MGM Theatre of 
the Air 



10:00 Silent Men. Doug 

10:15 | Fairbanks, Jr. 

10:30 Robert Montgomery 

10:35 Music Room 



Thursday 



News. Bill Henry 
Out of the Thunder 
Family Theatre 



Frank Edwards 
I Love A Mystery 
Dance Bands 



ABC Reporter 



Taylor Grant, News 
Elmer Davis 
Lone Ranger 



Mystery Theatre 
Top Guy 



Mr. President 
Crossfire 



News of Tomorrow 
Dream Harbor 
Latin Quarter 
Orchestra 



Jackson & the News 
You and the World 
Curt Massey 
Lowell Thomas 



Beulah 

Jack Smith Show 

Club 15 

Edward R. Murrow 



Big Town with 

Walter Greaza 
Dr. Christian 



Red Skelton 
Bing Crosby 



Evening Programs 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



Lionel Ricau 
6:05 Petite Concert 
Bill Stern 
'Three Star Extra 



Local Programs 



ABC Reporter 



7:00 ! Richard Harkness 
7:15 The Playboys 



7:30 
7:45 



News of the World 
One Man's Family 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Rukeyser Reports 
Gabriel Heatter 
Mutual Newsreel 



Father Knows Best 

Mr. Keen. Tracer of 
Lost Persons 



Modern Casanova — 

Errol Flynn 
Hardy Family with 

Mickey Rooney 

Lewis Stone 



Taylor Grant. News 
Elmer Davis 
Silver Eagle 



Boxing Bouts 

News, Charles Col- 
lingwood 



Jackson & the News 
You and the World 
Curt Massey 
Lowell Thomas 



9:00 Dragnet 

9:05 

9:30 Counter Spy 

9:45 



10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:35 



Your Hit Parade Frank Edwards 

I Love A Mystery 
Robert Montgomery Dance Bands 
Music Box 



Cafe Istanbul. 
Marlene Dietrich 

Defense Attorney 
with Mercedes 
McCambridge 



News, Bill Henry Ted Mack's Original 
Rod & Gun Club I Amateur Hour 
Reporters' Roundup 

Foreign Reporter 



News of Tomorrow 
Club Can-Do 



Beulah 

Jack Smith Show 
Peggy Lee Show 
Edward R. Murrow 



Summer Show 
Hallmark Playhouse 



Mr. Chameleon 
3:25 News 
Mr. Keen Tracer of 
Lost Persons 



Hollywood Sound- 
Stage 
Presidential Profiles 



Friday 



Evening Programs 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


Lionel Ricau 
6:05 Petite Concert 
Bill Stern 
Three Star Extra 


Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & the News 
Dwight Cooke 
Curt Massey 
Lowell Thomas 


7:00 'Richard Harkness 
7:15 The Playboys 
7:30 News of the World 
7:45 jOne Man's Family 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Mr. Mystery 
Gabriel Heatter 
Mutual Newsreel 


Taylor Grant, News 
Elmer Davis 
Lone Ranger 


Beulah 
Jack Smith 
Club 15 
Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 Roy Rogers 

8:15 1 

8:30 Bob & Ray Show 

8:45 


Maisie with Ann 

Sothern 
Gracie Fields Show 


Richard Diamond 

with Dick Powell 
This Is Your F.B.I. 


Musicland, U.S.A.— 
Earl Wrightson 

Big Time with 
Georgie Price 


9:00 
9:05 
9:30 
9:45 


Mario Lanza Show 

Screen Directors' 
Playhouse 


News. Bill Henry 
Magazine Theatre 
Armed Forces 
Review 


Ozzie & Harriet 

Mr. District Attorney 
9:55 News, Win Elliot 


Doris Day Show 

Robert Q's Wax- 
works 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:35 


Tin Pan Valley 

Robert Montgomery 
Portraits in Sports 


Frank Edwards 
1 Love A Mystery 
Dance Bands 


Boxing Bouts 
Sports Page 


Robert Trout, News 
10:05 Capitol Cloak- 
room 



73 



I 



nside Radio 



Saturday 



NBC 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



Morning Programs 



8:30 


Howdy Doody 


Local Program 


No School Today 


Renfro Valley 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Anybody Home 






News of America 
Garden Gate 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 

10:45 


Archie Andrews 

Mary Lee Taylor 
Show 


Local Program 

Bruce MacFarlane, 

News 
Helen Hall 


Space Patrol 


St. Louis Melodies 
Galen Drake 
Quiz Kids 


11:00 
11:15 

11:30 
11:45 


My Secret Story 
News, Earl Godwin 

Hollywood Love 
Story 


Adventure on Thun- 
der Hill 
U. S. Marine Band 


New Junior Junction 

At Ease, with P.F.C. 
Eddie Fischer 


News, Bill Shadel 
1 1 :05 Let's Pretend 

Give and Take 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 
12:15 
12:30 

12:45 


News 

Public Affairs 

U. S. Marine Band 


Fifth Army Band 


101 Ranch Boys 
American Farmer 


Theatre of Today 

Stars Over Holly- 
wood 
12:55 Cedric Adams 


1:00 
1:15 

1:30 
1:45 


National Farm and 
Home Hour 

U. S. Coast Guard 
Cadets on Parade 


Music 

Dunn on Discs 


Navy Hour 
Vincent Lopez Show 


Grand Central 
1:25 It Happens 

Every Day 
City Hospital 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


Coffee in Washington 
Big City Serenade 


Georgia Crackers 


Front and Center 
Treasury Band 


Music With the Girls 
Make Way For Youth 


3:00 

3:15 

3:30 
3:45 


Down Homers 
U. S. Army Band 


Bandstand, U. S. A. 
3:25 News 
Sport Parade 


Pan American Union 
Treasury Band 


Report From Over- 
seas 

Adventures in 
Science 

Farm News 

Correspondents' 
Scratch Pad 


4:00 
4:15 
4:30 
4:45 


Win, Place or Show 
Horse Racing 
Musicana 


Caribbean 

Crossroads 
Hawaii Calls 


News and Sports 

Lone Pine Moun- 
taineers 


Stan Dougherty 

Presents 
Cross Section, U.S.A. 


5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


Mind Your Manners 

Helping Hand 
Terrea Lea 


Harmony Rangers 

Bands For Bonds 
Dizzy Dean 


Roseland 

At Home With Music 
Club Time 


Music Festival 
Treasury Bandstand 



Evening Programs 



6:00 
6:15 

6:30 
6:45 


Bob Warren 

News, H. V, Kalten- 

born 
Summer Concert 


Smiley Whitley 
Pentagon Report 


Una Mae Carlisle 
Bible Message 

Harry Wismer 
Talking It Over 


News, Ed Morgan 
U.N. On Record 

Sports Roundup 
Larry LeSueur, News 


7:00 
7:15 

7:30 
7:45 


Public Affairs 


Al Heifer, Sports 
Twin Views of the 

News 
Down You Go 
7:55 Cecil Brown 


As We See It 
Bert Andrews 

Dinner at the Green 
House 


This 1 Believe 
7:05 At the Chase 

Gunsmoke 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


Jane Ace, Disc 

Jockey 
Ralph Edwards Show 


20 Questions 

MGM Theatre of 
the Air 


Saturday Night 
Dancing Party 


Gene Autry Show 
Tarzan 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Meet Your Match 
Grand Ole Opry 


Lombardo Land 




Gangbusters 
9:25 Win Elliot 
Broadway's My 
Beat 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 


Vaughn Monroe 
Show 

Chamber Music 
Society of Lower 
Basin Street 


Chicago Theatre of 
the Air 


At the Shamrock 
Dance Music 


Stars in the Air 

Robert Q's 
Waxworks 



74 



Sunday 



NBC MBS ABC 

Morning Programs 

8:30 String Quartet Lyrically Speaking 



9:00 
9:15 



9:30 
9:45 



10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 



11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
11:45 



World News Roundup 
We Hold These 

Truths 
Carnival of Books 
Faith in Action 



National Radio 

Pulpit 
Art of Living 
News, Peter Roberts 



Faultless Starch Time 
Morning Serenade 
UN is My Beat 
The Author Speaks 



Elder Michaux 
Back to God 



Radio Bible Class 
Voice of Prophecy 



William Hillman 
Health Quiz 
Reviewing Stand 



Milton Cross Album 
Voice of Prophecy 



Message of Israel 
College Choir 



Fine Arts Quartet 
Christian in Action 



CBS 



Renfro Valley Sun- 
day Gathering 



Trinity Choir 
World News Roundup 

Organ Concert % 



Church of the Air 



Salt Lake Tabernacle 

Choir 
Bill Shadel, News 
11:35 Invitation to 

Learning 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 


Viewpoint, U. S. A. 


College Choirs 


Brunch Time 


People's Platform 


12:15 


Latin American Music 








12:30 


The Eternal Light 


News, Bill Cunning- 
ham 


Piano Playhouse 


Howard K. Smith 


12:45 




Frank and Ernest 




Bill Costello, News 


1:00 


Critic at Large 


Fred Van Deventer 


Herald of Truth 


Syncopation, Please! 


1:15 


"Mike 95" 


Health Quiz 






1:30 


Univ. of Chicago 


Lutheran Hour 


National Vespers 




1:45 


Roundtable 








2:00 


The Catholic Hour 


Top Tunes with 


Marines in Review 


The Symphonette 


2:15 




Trendler 






2:30 


Hats in the Ring 


Dixie Quartet 


San Francisco 
Sketchbook 


N. Y. Philharmonic 
Symphony, Dmitri 


2:45 




Health Quiz 




Mitropoulos 


3:00 


Elmo Roper 


Bandstand, U. S. A. 


This Week Around 




3:15 


America's Music 




the World 




3:30 


Bob Considine 


Air Force Hour 


Billy Graham 




3:45 


John Cameron 
Swayze, News 








4:00 


The Falcon with Les 
Damon 


Under Arrest 


Old Fashioned 
Revival Hour 


Music For You 


4:15 








This Black Book 


4:30 


Martin Kane with 


Matthew Bell with 




Hearthstone of the 


4:45 


Lee Tracy 


Joseph Cotten 
4:55 Bobby Benson 




Death Squad 


5:00 


Hollywood Star 


The Shadow 


Sammy Kaye 


King Arthur God- 


5:15 


Playhouse 




Serenade 


frey's Round Table 


5:30 


Whitehall 1212 


True Detective 
Mysteries 




World News, 
Robert Trout 


5:45 








5:55 News, Larry 
LeSueur 



Eve 

6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


ning Progra 

Tales of Texas 

Rangers 
The Chase 


ms 

Gabby Hayes 

Nick Carter 
6:55 Cecil Brown 


George E. Sokolsky 
Don Gardner 
HereComesTheBand 


Inner Sanctum 

Our Miss Brooks 
with Eve Arden 


7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


Best Plays 


Affairs of Peter 

Salem 
Little Symphonies 


Concert From Canada 
Great Adventure 


F.B.I, in War and 

Peace 
Amos 'n' Andy 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


Meet Your Match 
Summer Symphony 


Great Day Show 
Enchanted Hour 


Stop the Music 


Edgar Bergen Show 

Playhouse on Broad- 
way 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Stars in Khaki & Blue 


Opera Concert 
John J. Anthony 


Drew Pearson 
Meet Corliss Archer 

Three Suns Trio 


Screen Guild Theatre 
Meet Millie 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 


Meet the Press 
American Forum 


This is Free Europe 


Paul Harvey 
Gloria Parker 
Bill Tusher in 
Hollywood 


Robert Trout, News 
10:05 The People Act 
The Choral iers 



f*V program highlights 

NEW YORK CITY AND SUBURBS AND NEW HAVEN CHANNEL 6 JUNE 11— JULY 10 



Baseball on Television 



Before the game: 



DATE 

Wed.-Thurs., 
June 11, 12 
Sat., June 14 

Sun., June 15 

Mon., June 16 
Tues., June 17 

Wed., June 18 
Thurs., June 19 

Fri., June 20 

Sat., June 21 

Sun., June 22 

Mon., June 23 

Tues., June 24 

Wed., June 25 

Fri., June 27 

Sat., June 28 

Sun., June 29 

Mon., June 30 

Tues., July 1 

Wed., July 2 

Thurs., July 3 
Fri., July 4 
Sat., July 5 
Sun., July 6 
Thurs., July 10 
*Double Header 



Day with the Giants with Laraine Day 11 
Knothole Gang with Happy Felton 9 
Yankee Preview with Joe DiMaggio 11 

TIME GAME CHANNEL 

2:25 P.M. Detroit vs. Yanks 11 

1 :20 P.M. St. Louis vs. Giants 11 

6:00 P.M. *Cinc. vs. Dodgers 9 

1:50 P.M. *S. Louis vs. Giants 11 

2:05 P.M. Cine. vs. Dodgers 9 

1:20 P.M. S. Louis vs. Giants 11 

8:20 P.M. Pitts, vs. Giants 11 

8:30 P.M. Chi'go vs. Dodgers 9 

1:30 P.M. Chi'go vs. Dodgers 9 

1:20 P.M. Pitts, vs. Giants 11 

1:30 P.M. Chi'go vs. Dodgers 9 

1:30 P.M. Pitts, vs. Dodgers 9 

8:20 P.M. Chicago vs. Giants 11 

1:20 P.M. Chicago vs. Giants 11 

8:30 P.M. Pitts, vs. Dodgers 9 

1:50 P.M. *Chi'go vs. Giants 11 

2:05 P.M. Pitts, vs. Dodgers 9 

1:20 P.M. Cine. vs. Giants 11 

8:30 P.M. S. Louis vs. D'gers 9 

1:30 P.M. S. Louis vs. D'gers 9 

8:30 P.M. Cine. vs. Giants 11 

1:20 P.M. Cine. vs. Giants 11 

1:30 P.M. S. Louis vs. D'gers 9 

8:20 P.M. Phila. vs. Yanks 11 

' 8:30 P.M. Boston vs. Dodgers 9 

1:55 P.M. Phila. vs. Yankees 11 

8:30 P.M. Boston vs. Dodgers 9 

2:00 P.M. *Wash. vs. Yanks 11 

2:05 P.M. Boston vs. Dodgers 9 

2:25 P.M. Boston vs. Yankees 11 

8:30 P.M. Phila. vs. Dodgers 9 

1:30 P.M. Phila. vs. Dodgers 9 

8:20 P.M. Boston vs. Yankees 11 

1:30 P.M. Phila. vs. Dodgers 9 

2:25 P.M. Boston vs. Yankees 11 

1:30 P.M. Giants vs. Dodgers 9 

1:50 P.M. *D"gers vs. Giants 11 

1:20 P.M. Phila. vs. Giants 11 

1:50 P.M. * Phila. vs. Giants 11 

8:20 P.M. S. Louis vs. Yanks 11 



12:00 Noon Ruth Lyons' SO Club • 4 & 6 

Fun and music with Ruth and her fifty studio guests. 
12:15 P.M. Love of Life • 2 & 6 
Lovely Peggy McCay stars in this daytime dramatic serial. 
1:30 P.M. Garry Moore Show • 2 & 6 
Big names guest in variety with Garry, Denise, Ken, Durward. 
2:30 P.M. The First Hundred Years • 2 & 6 
The mistakes and adventures of a young, married couple. 
3:00 P.M. The Big Payoff • 4 & 6 
Glamorous undies to mink wTaps are the prizes on this quiz 
show, co-emceed by Randy Merriman and beautiful Bess Myer- 
son. 

3:30 P.M. Bert Parks Show • 2 & 6 (M,W,F) 
Bobby Sherwood and Betty Ann Grove cut up with the Dixie 
Dvnamo. 

4:00 P.M. Hate Smith Show • 4 & « 
An hour of solid variety, beamed right at the housewife, with 
Kate as your gracious hostess, assisted by Ted Collins, featuring 
Bill Goodwun, Robin Chandler and fifteen minutes of Winner 
Take All. 

5:00 P.M. Hawkins Falls, Pop. G,200 • 4 
The drama and philosophy of a small town in America. 
7:30 P.M. Broadway TV Theatre • 9 
Broadway hit plays of past years presented full-length in orig- 
inal format. Play repeated five nights. New show each week. 



Monday P.M. 



7:30 P.M. Hollywood Screen Test • 7 

TV's second oldest dramatic show featuring Neil Hamilton as 

host and "test director" to ambitious, young actors. 

0:00 P.M. Winehell-Mahoney Show • 4 

Paul and his not-so-dummy Jerry in variety-quiz. 

8:30 P.M. Godfrey's Talent Scouts • 2 

Unknown professionals get a helping hand from King Arthur. 

9:00 P.M. I Love Lucy • 2 & 6 

Lucille balls up the works in comedy with husband Desi Arnaz. 

9:30 P.M. Claudia • 2 & S 

Series starring Joan McCracken in domestic complications. 

10:00 P.M. Summer Theatre • 2 & 6 

The tradition of Studio One continues but with lighter drama 

and some repeats of winter successes for the summer. 



Monday through Friday 



7:00 A.M. Today • 4 & 6 

Garroway rides the rising sun with two hours of headline news 

as WNBT begins its full day of TV programming. 

10:15 A.M. Arthur Godfrey Time • 2 

Simulcast of Art's radio show so you can peek behind the scene. 

10:30 A.M. Bride and Groom • 2 

John Nelson emcees as the early bird catches the bride. 

10:15 A.M. Super Store • 2 

The bargain counter is stacked with laughs and music. The 

proprietor is popular comedian. Lew Parker. 

11:30 A.M. Strike It Rich • 2 & 6 

Sympathetic interviews by Warren Hull as contestants in need 

of assistance try to earn as much as $500 in cash. 

12:00 Noon The Egg and 1 • 2 

The scrambled problems of a couple in the egg business. 



Tuesday 



7:30 P.M. Beulah • 7 

Louise Beavers, in title role, keeps the Henderson family happy 
in spite of minor crises and mistakes. 
8:00 P.M. Juvenile Jury • 4 & 6 

Jack Barry and his moppets cut up some humorous questions. 
9:00 P.M. Fireside Theatre • 4 

New, tbirty-minute dramatic plays, filmed in Hollywood, re- 
placed by Boss Lady, July 1. 
9:30 P.M. Suspense • 2 & 6 

Melodrama plotted to keep you on the edge of your chair. 
9:30 P.M. Circle Theatre • 4 

Popular dramatic series ranging from romance to murder. 
10:00 P.M. Banger • 2 

Highly and deservedly praised plays of suspense and mystery. 
10:00 P.M. Original Amateur Hour • 4 & 6 
Soft-spoken Ted Mack introduces hopefuls of all ages, who 
strive for applause and entry into the world of show business. 



75 



I V program highlights 



Wednesday 



Saturday 



8:00 P.M. Godfrey and His Friends • 2 & 6 

Frank Parker takes over emcee chore in July. 
0:00 P.M. Strike it Rich • 2 & G 

Warren Hull plugs in the heart line to the nation. 
0:00 P.M. Kraft Theatre • 4 

Video's oldest dramatic show with superbly produced plays. 

0:00 P.M. Ellery Queen • 7 

Exciting crime adventure with the suave criminologist, played 

bv screen actor Lee Bowman. Florenz Ames as his father. 

9:30 P.M. The Web • 2 

Spine-tingling melodramas adapted from mystery fiction. 

10:00 P.M. International Boxing Club • 2 & 6 

Bouts continue through the summer from outdoor arenas. 

10:00 P.M. Celanese Theatre • 7 

The lauded dramatic series closes a brilliant season with two 

fine plays: June 11, "When Ladies Meet," by Rachel Crothers; 

June 25, "On Borrowed Time," by Paul Osborn. Alternate 

weeks finds Pulitzer Prize Playhouse adapting works by noted 

writers. 



Thursday 



8:00 P.M. You Bet Your Life • 4 

Beetle-browed Groucho Marx browbeats contestants. 
8:30 P.M. Chance of a Lifetime • 7 
Dennis James in the role of quiz and pay master. 
8:30 P.M. Ant os 'n' Andy • 2 (& at 0:30 P.M.) 

Tim Moore, Alvin Childress, and Spencer Williams in the great 

Harlem comedy show. 

0:00 P.M. Man Against Crime • 2 

Ralph Bellamy as the rough-and-ready, crime-busting sleuth. 

9:00 P.M. Gangbusters • 4 

Action-packed crime series biweekly. Alternate weeks: Dragnet 

starring Jack Webb. 

0:00 P.M. The Buggies • 7 

Charley Ruggles, himself, in this domestic-comedy series. 

9:30 P.M. Big Town • 2 

Pat McVey stars as crusading reporter Steve Wilson. 



Friday 



7:30 P.M. Stu Erwin • 7 

Delightful episodes of a typical family's daily life. 
8:00 P.M. Mama • 2 & 6 

Charming Peggy Woods in title role on this weekly series, de- 
scribing heartwarming family life of Norwegian immigrants. 
8:00 P.M. BCA Victor Show • 4 

Comedian-singer Dennis Day in a comedy show June 13 followed 
by actor-singer Ezio Pinza in a musical revue on the 20th. 
8:30 P.M. My Friend irma • 2 

Laugh-getting Marie Wilson as the nonsensical, sweet steno. 
8:30 P.M. We, the People • 4 & 6 
For the duration of the Presidential campaign, this show will 
dramatically present all sides of the race to the White House. 
0:00 P.M. Playhouse of Stars • 2 
Half-hour drama billing many of our most celebrated actors. 
9:00 P.M. Biy Story • 4 & 6 

Actual dramatized experiences of reporters making headlines. 
9:00 P.M. Bown You Go • 5 

Popular panel quiz presided over by Dr. Bergen Evans. 
9:30 P.M. Aldrich Family • 4 & 8 
For many years, one of the country's favorite comedy series. 
10:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Stars • 5 
Comedian Larry Storch takes over emcee chore of this big 
TVariety on July 4th when Jackie Gleason bows out and moves 
to CBS. 



12:00 Noon Big Top • 2 & 6 

Ringmaster Jack Sterling with exciting, circus variety. 
.7:00 P.M. Italian Feature Film • 9 

The best of exceUent Italian celluloid: June 14, "King of the 

Circus," starring Clara Calami; June 21, "Sin of Poppa Martin," 

Rugerro Ruggeri; June 28, "Eternal Melody," Gino Cervi; 

July 5, "A Yank in Rome," Valentina Cortesa and Leo Dale. 

7:30 P.M. Beat the flock • 2 

Contestants beat their brains to perform tricky stunts in limited 

time. Bud Collyer is timekeeper and judge. | 

7:30 P.M. One Man's Family • 4 & 6 

The Barbour family, as always, stimulating and entertaining. 

8:00 P.M. Ken Murray • 2 & 6 

Hollywood's Ambassador replete with lovely show girls, gags, 

dramatic sketches, dance and song in a great big revue. 

0:00 P.M. All Star Revue • 4 

This big comedy show closes out its season with four big stars: 

June 14, Jimmy Durante; June 21, Spike Jones; June 28, Jack 

Carson; July 5, Danny Thomas. 

10:30 P.M. Your Hit Parade • 4 & 6 

From one to ten, the most popular ballads in the country, sung 

by Snooky Lanson, Dorothy Collins and Eileen Wilson, replaced 

by Assignment Manhunt, crime series, July 2. 



Sunday 



1:45 P.M. Joe BiMaggio's Bugout • 4 

The pride of the Yanks interviews stars of the diamond. 
1:30 P.M. Greatest Story Ever Told • 2 
Once a month feature, June 22nd in this period, of dramatized 
Biblical stories, similar to the well-known radio show. 
5:00 P.M. Super Circus • 7 (& 6 at 5:30 P.M.) 
The dazzling center ring with breathtaking performances. 
0:30 P.M. Braw to Win • 2 
Henry Morgan emcees this cartoon comedy-quiz. 
7:30 P.M. Lucky Clues • 2 & 6 

A brand-new mystery panel show filling in for This is Show Biz. 
7:30 P.M. Four Square Court • 7 

Two workers in criminal rehabilitation and two ex-convicts 
make up a panel to discuss problems of individual lawbreakers. 
8:00 P.M. Toast of the Town • 2 & 6 
Broadway columnist and showman, Ed Sullivan, presents, week 
in, week out, the very best variety entertainment in the country. 
8:00 P.M. Comedy Hour • 4 
Replaced on June 22 by the Big Payoff. 

9:00 P.M. information Please • 2 (& 6 at 6:00 P.M.) 
Erudite Clifton Fadiman is back at the old stand with the TV 
version of the long-time radio favorite. John Kiernan and 
Franklin P. Adams will be on hand with their encyclopedic 
brains. 

9:00 P.M. Television Playhouse • 4 & 6 
Full-hour teleplays produced and originating from NYC studios. 
0:30 P.M. Break the Bank • 2 

Handsome hosts, Bud Collyer and Bert Parks, with the famous 
quiz show that has paid over $10,000 in cash to individuals. 
10:00 P.M. Celebrity Time • 2 & 6 
Panel quiz emceed by one-time matinee idol, Conrad Nagel. 
10:30 P.M. What's My Line? • 2 

John Daly holds firm but polite reins on panelists Kilgallen, 
Cerf, Francis and Block who guess at contestants' occupations. 
11:00 P.M. Brew Pearson • 7 

Mr. Pearson gives sharp analyses of world events and predic- 
tions of future happenings. 



76 



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( Continued from page 44) was one of hun- 
dreds of teen-agers who had crowded the 
studio each day in the hopes that she would 
be crowned Queen. Janet had written that 
she wished she might have an opportunity 
to take dramatic lessons at some good 
school. Putting her dream down in black 
and white had somehow made it ordinary, 
somehow made it a foolish fancy and she 
was thinking that perhaps the studio audi- 
ence, which was to vote by its applause, 
would think it just another silly figment of 
a teen-ager's imagination. 



Halfway through the program, Janet 
found herself up on the stage with a lot of 
other girls who had wishes they wanted 
granted. And the applause was deafening, 
it seemed to Janet, for each and every one 
of them. Then, in one breathless second, 
everything changed and there was Jack 
Bailey coming toward her, coming toward 
Janet with the crown that meant she had 
won! Getting into the scarlet robe, adjust- 
ing the crown on her head, Janet heard 
Jack Bailey reading off the list of prizes 
which she had won: 

Dramatic lessons at the Geller Work- 
shop in Hollywood 

A dress with hat, matching gloves 
and purse 
A cosmetic set 

A trip to Tucson, Arizona, in an air- 
plane with her mother 

And in Tucson, dream of all dreams, 
a date with a different escort every six 
hours. 

"I was so excited my seventeen-year- 
old toes curled!" Janet exclaims. "Since the 
plane was to leave shortly after the broad- 
cast, I had the clothes that I'd worn to the 
show. I'm sure my dad was as excited as I, 
because he bought me everything I needed 
for staying overnight. A traveling bag, 
which I shared with mother, nice pajamas, 
stockings, just everything. For once, he 
didn't mind paying the bills. 

"Harry Mynatt, the program's official 
host, took us to lunch and then Mother and 
I and Mr. Mynatt went to the airport. It 
was only three hours since the program 
had first called my name, but already two 
tickets to Queen for a Day had done so 
much! 

"When the plane landed at Tucson, May- 
or Nick Hall and Tucson's Vigilantes were 
there on horseback to welcome us. Imagine 
being met by horses! Lieutenant Ray Ya- 
tuni, the first of the Army's official escort, 
was also there. After seeing the horses, I 
noticed the Lieutenant. He had nice eyes 
and wavy dark hair and he was quiet. At 
least, compared to the crowd of photog- 
raphers and the Mayor and everyone else, 
he seemed quiet. And there was good rea- 
son, I discovered later, for me to think that 
^e appeared quiet. He was. He was there — 
under protest — just doing a favor! 

"Mother and I and Mr. Mynatt were 
•vhisked off to the lovely Santa Rita Hotel 
.^here we were to stay. I didn't get a 
"fiance to think much of anything about 
anybody. My escort for dinner was Lieu- 
tenant Yatuni, but it was the wild rice that 
impressed me — it was so exotic!" 

After dinner, the Queen's party traveled 
from one end of Tucson to another, seeing 
the sights, not missing a spot. Then, at the 
end of the evening, Lieutenant Yatuni 
suggested a trip to "A" mountain for a 
view of Tucson at night. 

"I thought it a strange name for a moun- 
tain but even stranger was the fact that our 
entire party was parked there looking down 
over the city. This, I was told, was Tuc- 
son's lover's lane." 
Janet didn't dare look at Ray, although 



Queen For a Day 

she could feel his eyes upon her. And 
when they all went back to the hotel, she 
thought it odd that Ray didn't say good- 
bye. He just sort of disappeared from the 
party. 

At breakfast the next morning, a new 
lieutenant arrived. But, to this day, Janet 
cannot tell what he looked like, for hover- 
ing in the background was Lieutenant Ya- 
tuni, grinning as much as to say he was 
there to keep his eye on her. The rest of 
the day saw Janet being fitted for a new 
Western outfit, then riding through giant 
saguaro cactus where she and her party 
had a picnic lunch. Lieutenant Yatuni was 
there, not saying anything, just watching 
and grinning. His grin widened when she 
was made a deputy sheriff and an honorary 
member of the Vigilantes and then given 
a huge six-shooter to fire. Janet had never 
seen anything bigger than a BB gun and 
was frightened to death of handling the 
firearm. 

Like all wonderful things, an ending had 
to come and Janet found herself beside 
Lieutenant Yatuni riding with the rest of 
her party to the Tucson airport. The rest of 
the people alighted from the car, leaving 
the Lieutenant to say goodbye. 

"And suddenly we had so much to talk 
about, so much to say that we were keeping 
Harry Mynatt holding the plane for me. As 
I dashed for the open door, Ray yelled 
that he'd write." 

Then all at once, as if awakening from 
a beautiful dream, Janet found herself 
home again, with a cowboy outfit, wonder- 
ful memories and the excitement of en- 
rolling in the Geller Workshop to remind 
her of the lucky day she had two tickets to 
Queen for a Day. 

"The theatre work was my dream come 
true and you can't blame me for over- 
looking the letter from the very nice Lieu- 
tenant — just left it unopened — in the ex- 
citement of my first few days at school. 
Imagine my embarrassment when I arrived 
home one evening from going to a play and 
I found the Lieutenant had flown all the 
way over from Arizona — and I wasn't home 
to see him. The next time a letter from 
him came, I opened it. He asked me for a 
date and told me he would be driving over 
and we would go to a dance in Long Beach, 
several miles from my home." 

Janet dressed herself in her nicest sum- 
mer outfit and set out for the dance with 
Ray, only to find him driving through the 
first red light, with his eyes shut. A little 
frightened and not quite knowing what to 
do, she told Ray to pull over to the curb 
and take a nap. Their first date and Ray 
was asleep! Ray slept until midnight, when 
Janet had to awaken him to drive her 
home. Practically without a word spoken, 
Ray drove Janet home and kept right on 
driving — to Tucson. The fates were truly 
against the two ever having their talk to- 
gether. 

But Lieutenant Ray Yatuni was a deter- 
mined fellow. 

"He wrote practically every day. Every 
few weeks he flew or drove over. I was 
being courted from Arizona," Janet says, 
her voice breaking as excitement keys its 
pitch. And just two months later, Septem- 
ber 30, 1945, Lieutenant Ray Yatuni ar- 
rived from Arizona with a present for 
Janet — an engagement ring and the words 
to go with it. 

"That evening we talked, and talked, and 
talked. Ray did a real 'selling job.' He said 
he'd wait a year before we married. And I 
said yes. My folks were delighted as long 
as we were being so sensible about it. Then, 
four months later, Ray was discharged 
from the Army and took a job in Los 
Angeles — as a salesman. He had no sooner 



settled down when he convinced my folks 
there was no sense in waiting and so on 
February 23, 1946, we were married in the 
Cathedral Chapel in Los Angeles. It was 
six months, to the day, from the time 
Mother and I walked into the Queen for a 
Day radio show. 

"On our honeymoon, we went to Ray's 
home in Gardner, Illinois," continued Janet. 
"It's a small town and I was kind of scared 
since it was really the first time I'd been 
away from home. 

"There were times when the electricity 
failed. The town had no motion picture 
theatre. After living in a modern suburb 
of California, this seemed strange to me. 
Yet, the family relationship in a small town 
is close, and the people learn to rely on 
themselves. I'm glad we were able to go 
there." 

After a year of Janet's learning the good 
and the bad about small-town life, Ray 
went on the road as a traveling salesman. 
"I'll bet he was the only traveling salesman 
with a wife on his arm — because you can 
bet that I went along!" Then Janet was 
pregnant and, after seven months, she re- 
turned to California to have the baby. 

David was born December 29, 1947. In 
February, 1948, Ray rejoined Janet, after 
getting a job as salesman for an ice cream 
firm. They bought a house in Whittier, 
California, a picturesque community at the 
foot of the San Bernadino Mountains. 

Janet feels that a woman should have 
interests outside her home. After settling 
in Whittier, which is near her own family 
home in Orange, Janet joined the Junior 
Women's Club, sponsored by a girl's church 
group, and became active in the Presby- 
terian Church's dramatic department. Her 
Geller Workshop training came in handy. 

When Janet rehearses for a play, Ray 
does the baby-sitting. One night, he took 
young David to the dress rehearsal of 
Janet's first starring role, in the Whittier 
Community Theatre's production of "Guest 
in the House." 

"Play too short," said baby David. 

When Janet is practicing her lines, baby 
David comes and sits at her feet and re- 
peats the lines after her. Later on, he can 
be heard muttering the lines to himself — 
obviously playing all the parts in his own 
little playland. Though he can be a prob- 
lem at times, Janet says, "Show me one 
that isn't at four years!" 

"David's crazy about cowboys. When he 
acts up, I just show him the pictures of me 
in Western riding clothes that were taken 
at Tucson, and he looks at the pictures and 
says, 'Ow, Mommy's a cowboy!' and then 
does everything I tell him — until the next 
time, of course." 



Since "Guest in the House" was such i 
success, Ray treated the family to a vaca- 
tion. Three days and 2,000 miles of driving 
took them to Mexico and back by way of 
the Grand Canyon, Zion National Park 
and Las Vegas, Nevada. Sentimentally, they 
passed through Tucson, Arizona. 

"I guess that brings us full circle," said 
Janet, "because it was the two radio tickets 
that took me to Tucson where we first 
met." 

Those same two tickets, to someone else, 
might have meant but one wish, fulfilled, 
one dream come true, but to Janet those 
two tickets were a beginning. The tickets 
brought her wonderful prizes and an excit- 
ing trip. Then came a whirlwind courtship 
by air, followed by marriage. And last and 
best of all, the tickets brought her a flower- 
bordered home — and her baby. Surely 
thos* were two tickets to a lifetime of 
happiness. 



83 



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(Continued from page 44) was one of hun- she could feel his eyes upon her. And settled down when he convinced my folks 
dreds of teen-agers who had crowded the when they all went back to the hotel, she there was no sense in waiting and so on 
studio each day in the hopes that she would thought it nrM that Tt^r aia^u „„„ ~ — j d_j «„,„.„ 



83 




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(Continued jrom ■page 31) 
hefty vitamin prescription if I ever had 
to lose out on my daily dosage of laughs 
with Link. 

It must seem odd, I suppose, to an out- 
sider, that we should be such pals. I 
could, if I had gotten around to that sort 
of thing early enough in life, have been 
Art's father. We don't let that worry us. 
I may be twenty years older than Link, 
but in another department I have a few 
years' edge on him. My oldest daughter, 
Dorothy, is three years younger than 
Link's son, Jack! 

Ours is a friendship which stands up 
because — as in most really good friend- 
ships—we are interested in the same 
things: Our families, chiefly, and our jobs. 
We have fun at the same things— travel, 
for instance. The four of us have visited 
Europe together for two summers now; 
this summer we'll have adjoining lanais 
on the Lurline for a trip to Hawaii, and 
each of us will take along our two oldest 
kids. 

We're typical tourists. 



Link will go anywhere, do anything, at 
the drop of a hat. Me, too. We think the 
Eiffel Tower is more interesting than the 
inside of the Ritz bar. 

We take pictures — of the same places, 
from the same angles — and we enter them 
regularly in the contests of the Stereo 
Realist club. We never win. 

All right. The pictures could be better. 
But it's fun. 

Some people, I notice, seem to think 
that fun is just a little sinful, and should 
be indulged in, if at all, in carefully 
rationed amounts. 

I never could see that. When I was a 
bricklayer, I had fun laying bricks. That 
was a long time ago, I'll admit. But the 
point stands. I've been in show business 
for thirty -three years and had a picnic 
every day of every one of them. 

I warmed up to Art Linkletter the first 
time I saw him — it was in 1942, at a din- 
ner given at Somerset House by the Avia- 
tion Country Club. I was a flyer then, so 
I was a guest, and having a romp. All of 
the guests, to put it mildly, were feeling 
no pain. But Art Linkletter was working, 
covering the event as a roving radio re- 
porter, and he was having a romp, too. 
Which was quite some trick. 

He got me up at the mike, and pounded 
me with those fast, sensible, interesting 
questions he's now famous for. He couldn't 
have been more considerate, and I couldn't 
have felt more comfortable — and ad-libb- 
ing is his forte, not mine. 

"This guy is good," I found myself 
thinking, and so I pitched in and dug him 
up some more of the temporarily grounded 
eagles. As it turned out, Art came through 
with a fast, funny program. He told me 
later that he had been on a spot. It was 
his first show, in a new series, for a 
sponsor noted for impatience. But it sure 
didn't show. 

I found myself looking for Art's pro- 
grams on the air, and hauling Alyce away 
from the kids to listen to him. 

She agreed that Link had the makings 
of one of the greatest m.c.'s in the country. 
The Corrells knew what it took, as I'll bet 
every one of the twenty-five thousand 
people Link has interviewed — on his 
House Party, People are Funny and Life 
with Linkletter shows — would agree. He's 
the one m.c, to my mind, who really likes 
his "funny people." You'll notice, he'll 
never let one of them make a goof of him- 
self — to him, no laugh is worth it. 

It still took five years for us all to get 



together socially, and that happened, as 
I've said, at a big, big party when we had 
very little chance really to get acquainted. 
But we did remark the odd coincidence 
of our "twin" wives . . . not just their 
appearance, but everything about them— 
their smiles, their expressions, their dis- 
positions (bless 'em) — were alike as two 
peas. 

When you would like a casual acquaint- 
ance to become a friend, leave it to the 
girls. After that first meeting, Alyce asked 
the Linkletters to our house for dinner. 
The next week, Lois Linkletter invited us. 
With that passel of children to compare 
notes about, the girls couldn't have been 
happier. And Link and I found more than 
The Business to gab about. Not long after 
that, a radio time switch put Link on the 
network directly following our own show 
— and we gabbed in our adjoining dress- 
ing rooms. A few years ago, the Linkletters 
bought a house a stone's throw from ours, 
so our families, too, were friendly neigh- 
bors. 

If our friendship is more solid than 
most show-business friendships, and I 
think it is, I think it's due to the fact that 
Link and I — while we make our living 
in the entertainment business — do our 
living, for the most part, outside of it. 
Link has been all over the country and met 
all kinds of people, who do all kinds of 
things. So have I. They bring the big, big 
world into the little world of Hollywood — 
and they let us look at it through their 
eyes. 

One of Link's great gifts, I think, is to 
think and feel from the other fellow's 
point of view. It moved him, among other 
things, to accept the West Coast chair- 
manship of the Foster Parents' Plan. He 
promptly "adopted" three little war or- 
phans of his own, and got such a kick out 
of it that Alyce and I adopted one, too, 
a little French girl, Marybelle Benneaux. 
It gave us one of the great experiences of 
our lives. 

We met Marybelle when we were in 
Paris last year. She came up to our suite 
at the Georges Cinq for lunch. I knew it 
was a big, fancy lunch, but I didn't realize 
that the big-eyed little kid had never 
seen that much food on one table in her 
life. She ate until she was groggy. And 
then she said she wanted to see the Eiffel 
Tower. A Parisian kid who hadn't seen 
the Eiffel Tower! (Who am I kidding? 
I've lived in California for twenty years 
and never have seen Catalina Island.) 

I gave another party in Paris, one of 
those "must" affairs. I had pockets full of 
notes to V.I.P. Americans in Paris whom 
I had promised to look up, so, with time 
growing short I borrowed Link's suite — 
with a spectacular view of all Paris — one 
afternoon, and invited them all for cock- 
tails. 

I told Link, since he gave me the hall, 
to invite anybody he wanted. 

And this is a thumbnail character sketch 
of my friend, Link. He invited a half- 
dozen people — all old, old friends of mine 
whom he had dug up from every corner 
of Paris. Then, like the real pal he is, 
he spent the afternoon making polite faces 
at all of my V.I.P.'s while I hashed over 
old times with my old cronies. 

Link, as you've probably read in the 
papers by now, has just landed a big, new 
deal which will make him one of the big- 
gest simulcast stars (simulcast is a new 
method of releasing radio and TV shows 
simultaneously). Link's House Party will 
be simulcast on CBS beginning next 
autumn for very important sponsorship. 
And he had it coming. 
It couldn't happen to a nicer guy. 



Johnny and 
Penny Olsen 



(Continued from page 35) 
Besides that, I didn't have a heater in my 
car. 

"He still owes me seven dollars," Penny 
cut in, with the broody air of one who 
nurtures an old grievance. "One snowy 
night — so all right, it was a blizzard — he was 
calling on me in Stevens Point and I let him 
have my railway ticket to get back to 
Milwaukee. I never got it back. It cost me 
seven pieces of folding money." 

"When we got married, I was really 
broke," said Johnny — was it defensively? 
"I was an announcer at the time — the chief 
announcer, in fact, on station WTMJ — the 
biggest station in Milwaukee, too. But I had 
a car and, in the order given, a girl. And 
both take a lot of gas. Besides, this was 
thirteen years ago, when salaries were not 
what they are today." 

"Neither was the dollar," Penny said re- 
mindfully. "What it is today, I mean, the 
poor little thing. And, anyway, you weren't 
an announcer while we were courting. 
When we first met, Johnny had an or- 
chestra," Penny explained, "which he di- 
rected and with which he sang. And I had 
a father and a stepmother who were very 
fond of Johnny. Real dyed-in-the-wool 
radio fans, they wouldn't have missed a 
Johnny Olsen broadcast to save their souls 
alive. Hilda, my stepmother, even kept a 
Johnny Olsen scrapbook, and that's how 
it all began — our courtship, I mean. When 
my folks heard that Johnny and his band 
were playing Iola, a small town about 
forty miles from Stevens Point, nothing, for 
goodness' sake, could have kept them from 
Iola. They insisted that I go along, too. 
I went along, none too willing, and here 
was this Johnny, hair glued down, slick as 
a whistle, from the Big City! When we 
walked into the pavilion where Johnny's 
band was playing — it was a Fourth of July 
celebration and dance — Johnny said, 
'Hello,' as he passed us. It was almost 
the undoing of Hilda. 



That's Johnny Olsen,' she said, her 
voice cracking, her cup running over. 

" 'Is it?' I asked, real indifferent. 

" 'And did you see,' Hilda asked, all 
a-twitter, 'how he looked at you?' 

" 'No,' I said. 

"A little later Johnny singled me out 
and asked me if there was any particular 
song I'd like him to play. I said that I'd 
choose 'I'll Be Seein' You.' Which was real 
mean of me, flirty-mean, because I wasn't 
particularly interested, being too much in- 
volved," Penny laughed, "with another 
Johnny! 

"As my parents were preparing to leave 
for home, Johnny Never-Miss-A-Trick 
spotted them, came down, said, 'You're not 
leaving so soon?' Then: 'Well, tell you 
what — you two go ahead and I'll see that 
your daughter gets home as soon as the 
dance is over.' 

"After the last dance, Johnny asked me, 
'You live right here in Iola, don't you?' 
'Oh no, I don't,' I replied gleefully and in 
a serve-you-right tone of voice. When I 
told him where I lived, Johnny took the 
prospect of the eighty-mile round-trip as 
well as could be expected, and presently 
he and his friend, Jack Hill — who has been 
our close friend all these years since — and 
I started out. Jack and I sang all the way 
home, and, eventually, Johnny came out 
of shock in time to sing with us and was 
quite perturbed when we got to my home 
and I didn't ask him in. 

"A few days later, I got a card from 




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Johnny saying that he would soon be driv- 
ing through Stevens Point on business and 
hoped I would be at home, as he'd like to 
drop by. He dropped by. He and Jack. 
Jack was our Miles Standish all the way 
through." 

The path of his true love, Johnny here 
remarked, could best be described as the 
sharp reverse of smooth. "Blocked as it 
was," he said, "by the lady's indifference 
because of the 'other Johnny.' But I 
worked," Johnny grinned, "through her 
father." 

"Johnny was, at that time, on a daily 
program," Penny explained, "for a tobacco 
sponsor. So he wooed my father with to- 
bacco — and with keeping our radio antenna 
in order, too — my step -mother with a 
cooky jar, which is still her chief treasure 
— and me with words. . . ." 

'As I wrote my own songs for that show, 
I'd send her messages," Johnny laughed, 
"in the theme songs. The only one I can 
remember right off the cuff: 

" 'Man, oh man, oh man alive, 
I'll be there at half -past five! 
Get the coffee pot to brew, 
Don't you know that I love 
you?'" 

"One time I didn't get the message," 
Penny recalled, "so the other Johnny was 
there, at 'half-past five!' " 

"We met July Fourth. It took me from 
then until October a year later, about a 
year and a half in all," said Johnny, "be- 
fore she. . . ." 

"Before I knew what you had known 
from the beginning," said Penny and, this 
time, she reached for his hand. 

"I think I fell in love, at first sight, with 
her dimples," Johnny said, reflectively, 
"and her youth, of course, and her pretty 
eyes. . . ." 

And Johnny had good reason for falling 
in love with Penny's eyes. Penny is pret- 
tier, very much prettier, off TV than on. 
TV takes away from the appearance of 
some people, adds to that of others. It takes 
away from Penny. The dimples that were 
Johnny's undoing, the blue eyes, the fine- 
textured white skin, the light brown hair 
worn pompadour — Penny's trade-mark — 
the slender figure add up, in the flesh, to 
more than the TV cameras give her. 

"I have a very vivid memory," Penny 
went on, "of the very moment when I knew 
that this Johnny was the Johnny. I was in 
the hospital following surgery. Major sur- 
gery, and serious. Johnny proposed to me 
as I was coming out of the ether. Then I 
knew. Pretty nice guy, I remember .think- 
ing, foggy as I was, to propose to a girl 
who — well, who didn't have everything. 
Pretty nice? Pretty wonderful. I said 'Yes' 
there and then." 

About a year after Penny and Johnny 
became Mr. and Mrs., they went to Cali- 
fornia, where the Rumpus Room originated 
as a disc jockey show. 

"We had to give that up," Penny said, 
"because of the war. So it was back to Mil- 
waukee for a year or two, then to New 
York and eventually to the Rumpus Room 
again, by day, and to our dearly loved 
Norman-style fieldstone house in Green- 
wich, Connecticut, by night and every 
work-filled wonderful weekend. Which 
brings me back, by circuitous route," 
Penny laughed, "to the 'great adjustment' 
I tried, and failed — " she squeezed John- 
ny's hand— "to tell you about. My biggest 
adjustment — which was that I had been, 
before I married, an independent girl. I 
had danced and sung ever since I was 
about five years old. I'd done a lot of sum- 
mer stock, with Charles Winninger and his 
brother, among others. I was accustomed 
to making my own money and — to spend- 
ing it. Now I was married and Johnny 
handled the money — he still does — and 



somehow none of it got into my hands. And 
such was my pride that I'd go along with- 
out something rather than ask him for cash! 
It took a bit of doing, it's still taking a 
bit of doing," Penny laughed again, "to 
undo that situation!" 

"I've saved quite a bit of money," Johnny 
put in, "while the saving was good. Mean- 
time I, too, have had adjustments to make, 
and still have. Some of them, I fear, are 
non-adjustable. One thing I can't stand, 
for instance — it takes me a good full hour 
and a half to wake up in the morning. For 
that hour and a half, I do not want to be 
looked at or spoken to. Not so Penny. She 
talks the ear off me even as her eyes are 
opening. . . ." 

"I spring right up," Penny said, with 
modest pride, "swing from the bar in the 
hall, turn on a record show to give me the 
bounce, and put the coffee on. . . ." 

"After my ear is talked off and I cease 
to be of further use, she talks the ear off 
our French poodles, Sheba and Lena," 
Johnny groaned, 

"Oh, do you know," Penny then ex- 
claimed delightedly, "what I hate about 
Johnny? He wears one-piece underwear 
which went out with buggy whips!" 

"I can't stand anything that constricts 
me," Johnny spoke with immense dignity, 
"especially around the waist." 

"Women wear girdles," said Penny stout- 
ly, "and they can breathe! With Johnny," 
she added, "freedom to breathe is a scle- 
rosis!" 

"Neurosis," said Johnny patiently, "is 
what Penny means, no doubt. The one 
thing Penny cannot do," he then explained, 
"she cannot remember names, places or 
things. On one occasion, we were going to 
St. Louis for a few days and Penny made 
a reservation in an hotel in Cincinnati!" 

"I'd been there before. It was," Penny 
said dreamily, "such a beautiful hotel. . . ." 

"Cannot remember names or associa- 
tions," Johny persisted against odds. "We 
once had Roland Young and Cornelia Otis 
Skinner as guests on our show and I was 
taking Penny over to meet them. Before I 
could even get out the first word of intro- 
duction, 'Oh, Mr. Ruggles,' gushed the 
Missus, 'I'm so happy to meet you!' The 
only resemblance, real or fancied, between 
actors Roland Young and Charles Ruggles 
is that they both have mustaches. A pretty 
Penny, that was! But her words are always 
mixed up. Also her sense of direction. 
When walking, if I want her to turn to the 
left, I tell her to turn to the right and she 
turns to the left! She's a cross between 
Jane Ace and Gracie Allen." 

"Another thing he doesn't like about me," 
Penny vouchsafed, "I never squeeze the 
toothpaste tube right — don't start at the 
bottom, that is, and pinch my way up to 
the top. Also, he says I never clean my 
handbags out, never can find anything in 
them, grope until he's groggy! 

"He has to have everything perfect in 
his room, in his closets, in his bureau 
drawers. My shelves — anyone snooping 
around in them wouldn't muss up a thing 
because they've been mussed up, by a 
mastermind, already! 

"Speaking of snooping reminds me of yet 
another thing I don't like about Mr. O. 
He's a detective. If I snoop on Saturday, 
for instance, when he's in New York doing 
his Red Goose Shoes TV show — and I'm 
at home enjoying my cleaning and cooking, 
with maybe just a spot of snooping for 
variety — he won't say anything that night. 
But a day later, maybe three or four 
days later, he'll ask me how I enjoyed 
moving his blue shirt to where the white 
one had been. It comes from his Boy Scout 
training— that routine they go through of 
looking at all the articles in a window and 
then naming them!" 

"I'm very fussy with clothes," Johnny 



admitted, "have a very large wardrobe. 
One of the largest, I daresay, of anyone 
in the profession." 

"I haven't," Penny said promptly. "One 
thing I let audiences know right away, I 
wasn't going to be a clothes-horse, a 
glamour-girl. 'I'm not on as a beauty,' I 
told them, 'but if you like me. . . .' I am 
very color-conscious, though, where my 
clothes are concerned. Very conscious of 
harmony of color. That comes, I suspect, 
from working with flowers. And I love to 
collect linens, china, glassware. . . ." 

"She shines them up," laughed Johnny, 
"the china and the glassware, I mean, and 
just looks at them! She's a hoarder. She'll 
keep a new coat, a new pocketbook or pair 
of shoes, for over a year, unworn, un- 
touched. About a year ago I bought her a 
powder blue quilted satin bathrobe. Once 
she's worn it, just once!" 

"Do I want it to trail all over the kitchen 
floor?" Penny demanded. 

At the word "kitchen," Johnny's eyes 
glittered. "Penny cooks," he said, as one 
would say "God's in His Heaven," or "Ex- 
celsior!" "That's the thing I like — a tepid 
word for it — about her!" 

"I wouldn't recommend it to any woman," 
Penny sniffed. "A husband never takes 
you out!" 

"She's spoiled me," Johnny said, all but 
singing, "not for nothing are we sponsored 
by Premier Foods; not for nothing is our 
theme song 'Penny's In the Pantry, Penny's 
In The Pantry!' Penny in the Pantry is 
sheer poetry . . . her roast beef, her south- 
ern-fried chicken, her gravy, won-der-ful 
gravy!" 

"Johnny has talents, too, home talents, I 
mean," said Penny, not to be outdone in 
giving tribute. "He's oh, very practical! 
He's a bricklayer, an electrician, a car- 
penter. A farmer, too. We've just bought 
a baby tractor — christened Buster — the 
better to plough and harrow the fourteen 
acres of our Sunny Ridge Farm." 

"I could spend all my time in doing 
things around the place," Johnny sighed. 
"When spring comes, it comes to me, to us 
both, as an occasion. Makes it tough to 
leave the farm, even for the Rumpus 
Room — " 

"Which we also love," Penny said, "very 
much indeed. Love the people we work 
with; love the children on our show. Hav- 
ing no children of our own, they are our 
children. . . ." 

"We're ambitious professionally, too," said 
Johnny. "We want to expand to the 
fullest. Broadway some day, perhaps, we're 
looking forward to that — " 

"I'm not really looking forward to any- 
thing," Penny said, her voice gentle, warm. 
"I'm having such a wonderful time now. I 
only live for the day, and each day is 
worth living for and never mind tomor- 
row. . . . 

"About three years ago, I had a second 
operation," Penny explained then, "an ex- 
ploratory. It could have been cancer. It 
wasn't. But when something like that hap- 
pens to you, when you have been living — 
or believe you've been living — on borrowed 
time and then find that, after all, you've 
got your whole life to live, you can't be 
upset by trivial things. You know what are 
the real things, the true and only things. I 
know what they are — Johnny. Johnny and 
me, together." 

There was that little silence which comes 
in deeply moving moments. 

Then: "Must get going now and make 
our train," Johnny said, as he and Penny 
unclasped hands, "or Buster will be there 
before us!" 

They make you laugh like a loon. Now 
and then, they give your heartstrings a 
tug. They're that kind. Johnny and Penny 
Olsen are pretty special. 




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BETTY GRABLE 



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stars and have circled the numbers of the ones you are to 
send me by return mail. 



NAME. 



STREET • 

CITY ZONE ... STATE. 



l, 

2 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
11. 
14. 
15. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
26. 
27. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
45. 
46. 
48. 
50. 
51. 
52. 
53. 
54. 
55. 
56. 
57. 
59. 
60. 
61. 
63. 
64. 
65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
73. 
74. 
75. 
76. 
78. 
79. 
82. 
83. 
84. 
85. 
86. 
87. 



90. 

91. 

92. 

93. 

94 

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97. 

98 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
11 
119 
120. 
121 
127 
128 
129 
130. 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138, 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145. 



Lana Turner 
Betty Groble 
Ava Gardner 
Clark Gable 
Alan ladd 
Tyrone Power 

Gregory Peck 

Rita Hayworth 

Esther Williams 

Elizabeth Taylor 

Cornel Wilde 

Frank Sinatra 

Van Johnson 

Rory Calhoun 

Peter Lawford 

Howard Duff 

Bob Mitchum 

Burt Lancaster 

Bing Crosby 

Shirley Temple 

June Haver 

June Allyson 

Ronald Reagan 

Dana Andrews 

Glenn Ford 

Bob Ryan 

Kathryn Grayson 

Gene Kelly 

Diana Lynn 

Doris Day 

Montgomery Gift 

Richard Widmark 

Mono Freeman 

Wanda Hendrix 

Perry Como 

Bill Holden 

John Garfield 

Bill Williams 

Barbara Hale 

Barbara Lawrence 

Lon McCallister 

Jane Powell 

Gordon MacRae 

Ann Blyth 

Jeanne Crain 

Jane Russell 

John Agar 

John Lund 

Bob Stack 

John Wayne 

Yvonne de Carlo 

Richard Conte 

Audie Murphy 

Dan Dailey 

Larry Parks 

Macdonald Carey 

Janet Leigh 

Wendell Corey 

Farley Granger 

Louis Jourdan 

Tony Martin 

Cary Grant 

John Derek 

Guy Madison 

Ricardo Montalban 

Mario Lanza 

Joan Evans 

Kirk Douglas 

Gail Russell 

Keefe Brasselle 

Dick Contino 

Scott Brady 

Bill Lawrence 

Vic Damone 

Shelley Winters 

Richard Todd 

Vera-Ellen 

Dean Martin 

Jerry Lewis 

Howard Keel 

Susan Hayward 

Barbara Stanwyck 
. Hedy Lamarr 
. Betty Hutton 

Coleen Gray 
. Terry Moore 
i. Ruth Roman 
. Patricia Neal 
I. Arlene Dahl 
. Tony Curtis 
. Piper Laurie 

Debbie Reynolds 

Penny Edwards 

Carleton Carpenter 

Jerome Courtland 
. Polly Bergen 

Marshall Thompson 
. Gene Nelson 
i. Jeff Chandler 
>. Rock Hudson 
. Stewart Granger 
I. John Barrymore, Jr. 
'. Debra Paget 

Dale Robertson 
. Marilyn Monroe 

Leslie Caron 
. Pier Angeli 
. Mitzi Goynor 
i. Marlon Brando 



COWBOY SPECIALS 

25. Dale Evans 

33. Gene Autry 

34. Roy Rogers 

35. Sunset Carson 

36. Monte Hale 

37. Hopalong Cassidy 

38. Bill Elliott 

39. Johnny Mack Brown 

40. Al "Lash" LaRue 

41. Jimmy Wakely 



87 




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Our Precious Years 



(Continued from page 28) 
conscientious student, but school itself was 
only something to be gotten through as 
well and as fast as I could. 

As a result of my own experience, I 
know how important it is to make as many 
friends as possible during a teen-ager's 
high-school days, and to have as much 
fun as you can with your own age group. 
I had one really close pal all through 
school, and Lois and I are still friends, al- 
though we see each other seldom. She 
married and stayed in St. Louis and I am 
in television and radio in New York. When 
we do get together, we have wonderful 
visits. 

In general, however, I held back from 
the usual schoolgirl friendships and confi- 
dences. I was always overweight, which 
made me self-conscious, and I was very 
shy. It was easier for me to sing for hun- 
dreds of strangers than to join the girls 
who were my own age. Even at lunch- 
time, I would go off by myself to read or 
study while I ate. I was consumed with 
a great desire to learn as much as I could, 
and I wanted all my time away from school 
for my music. 

Naturally, my schoolmates misunder- 
stood my bashfulness and thought I was 
snobbish and stuck-up, and I in turn felt 
even more keenly that they were being 
critical of me. 

Perhaps because I was thrown so much 
with older people in my work, I felt that 
the boys at school were too young for me, 
and I made my dates with boys who were 
older. That, too, seems like a mistake 
now. At fifteen, I thought I was deeply 
in love with a boy of nineteen who was 
out of school, but after six months he be- 
gan to date an "older woman" around 
twenty and my heart was broken. 

Knowing what I do now, I think a teen- 
ager is unfair to herself if she gets too 
interested in one boy while still in high 
school, because this is a period of chang- 
ing ideas and emotions, and the boy who 
seems perfect to you today may not be 
your dream man at all six months from 
now. If it is really love, then it will still 
be love — six months later, a year later, 
even four years later — so a girl can afford 
to wait and see. It's better to double-date 
or go out with groups of kids. It is much 
too easy to get serious about one boy, if 
you see him alone constantly and grow 
dependent upon him for companionship. 
In my case, I missed a lot of the parties 
and group get-togethers, not because I 
paired off with a boy, but because I 
thought I didn't have time for them. 

Competitive sports were something else 
I shied away from. I wasn't very good at 
games and I didn't even try to be. For 
the sports that were a "must" I was always 
picked last, because no one wanted a girl 
on a team who didn't care whether they 
won or lost. I secretly envied the girls 
who played well and had boy friends on 
the football and basketball teams who let 
them wear their sweaters. I told myself 
it didn't matter, yet of course it did. 

Clubs and other groups are important, 
too. I belonged to the Spanish club, be- 
cause I spoke the language, and the Latin 
club, because I got interested in medicine 
for a while and thought an early start in 
Latin would help me become a doctor. I 
even joined a History club, but I thought 
social clubs were a waste of time! 

How I've wished at times I'd had a taste 
of responsibility in those years! The more 
responsibility you take on as a teen-ager, 
the easier it is to take responsibility later, 



and to grow stronger, more self-reliant 
and more of a leader. This question of 
self-reliance is very important all through 
school years. You need to respect your 
parents' feelings and their authority, and 
yet you must learn to stand on your own 
feet. Parents can help by treating their 
young one as a person instead of a child 
and by realizing that she now begins to 
face grown-up problems and will have to 
make some decisions of her own before 
long. My family were so devoted to me, 
and so proud of me, that they thought 
everything I did was right, and even now 
I can't be sure when they tell me I have 
given a good performance. As far as they 
are concerned, every performance is good, 
because love blinds them to any faults. 
Fortunately, other people are not so gen- 
erous, and I have learned to take criticism 
and to benefit by it. 

An only child, such as I was, is apt to be 
over-protected. At seventeen, when I had 
an opportunity to go to Hollywood for a 
screen test, it was the first time I had been 
away from home for a night. My folks 
put me on the train in St. Louis and my 
aunt and uncle, with whom I was going to 
stay, met me, but it must have been very 
hard for the family to see their "baby," 
as they still called me, go off so far alone. 
When I went to London a little later to 
star in a musical, I was really alone in a 
world of strangers. I had not learned at 
school how to get along with new people, 
and new conditions, and it was very diffi- 
cult until I did learn. Everything had 
always been done for me at home, to save 
my time for my music, and I had to learn 
to press my clothes, to mend, and to cook 
a little. I think every girl should do these 
things while she is still going to school. 

Learning to share is another great thing 
that high school years can teach you. I 
was too reticent to give my confidence to 
or get confidences from anyone except 
Lois. No one borrowed my socks or my 
books, because I didn't let them get close 
enough to me for that. I lived through my 
little disappointments and triumphs alone, 
except when they were important enough 
to tell about them at home. Only when I 
got to London did I realize how bitter the 
greatest triumph can be when it isn't 
shared. I sang in concert one night and 
the King and Queen attended, but after 
the applause and the encores were over 
I was alone in my dressing room, taking 
off my make-up. Suddenly I realized 
that this was a great day in my life and 
everyone who could really rejoice with 
me was thousands of miles away, back in 
America. I hurried out to hide my tears. 
The doorman bowed me into the car, and 
only a waiter stayed near while I ate a 
lonely supper. When I put my head down 
on the pillow in a strange hotel, I cried 
myself to sleep. That one experience 
taught me more than any other that un- 
shared joys can be pretty hollow, a thing 
I had not realized while I was growing up. 

My study and my hard work did help 
me to get started on a career, but the 
point is that I could have been just as far 
and still had more fun. I could have had 
more friendships in my schooldays, more 
understanding of other people, and more 
self-confidence, and still had my career. 
Someday, when I have better learned 
these lessons of understanding and coop- 
eration which all must finally learn, I want 
to marry — this time for keeps — and have 
a family. When my daughters go to high 
school, I shall tell them exactly what I 
have said here and hope that it will help 
them to be happy and successful — and to 
have a wonderful time all through their 
precious teen years. 




(Continued from page 29) 
and he felt like all singers and actors at 
moments like this — discouraged, unhappy, 
a failure. A friend of his came bursting into 
his dressing room, acting like a man seized 
by panic, and immediately started pour- 
ing out a string of words, most of which 
did not make sense. After several minutes 
of trying to piece the conversation together, 
Frank realized his friend was trying to tell 
him that he'd arranged an audition for a 
new radio show. The producers were look- 
ing for a tenor and Frank had every chance 
of getting the job if he'd hurry over to the 
radio station for an audition, but right now! 

Frank was in no mood to rush off to 
anything — especially radio. Radio, at that 
time, was something no self-respecting 
artist could tolerate. However, Frank had 
gotten pretty discouraged with show busi- 
ness. He had rehearsed "My Princess" with 
Hope Hampton for five strenuous weeks, 
and it was rather disappointing to realize 
that all his work — and the work of a hun- 
dred others — had produced nothing more 
than a flop. Under the circumstances, any 
chance to land a job would have been at- 
tractive, but radio — well, that was some- 
thing else again. Frank's friend, however, 
wasn't having any part of the reasoning 
which Frank was expressing out loud. In- 
stead of arguing, he was pulling Frank 
into his coat, rushing him into a cab and 
before there was much more to be said, 
Frank was in the studio of station WEAF 
(now WNBC). 

Introductions were made all around and 
Frank was told he was late. To add to his 
embarrassment, he realized that he had 
been expected to bring songs which would 
show off his repertoire. He glanced around 
the studio and there, on a chair beside the 



A Song from His Heart 

piano, was a stack of sheet music. Desper- 
ately, because by this time it was a matter 
of pride which made him feel he couldn't 
fail in front of these radio people, he 
grabbed the first piece off the top. 

It was the Rodgers-and-Hart tune, "With 
a Song In My Heart," which Frank had 
never sung before but which he had heard 
many times. He handed the music to a 
rather bored accompanist and began the 
song. Its melody soared straight and true 
and, after the song, there was a brief 
silence. Then spontaneous applause in the 
studio. Frank had a job. He was to be 
starred as the singer on the Ever-Ready 
Hour. But more than that, this song was to 
set Frank's foot on the path of one of the 
most wonderful careers in radio. It was the 
turning point of his life and, whenever he 
auditioned after that, "With a Song In My 
Heart" was the song he used. He had 
moved along from the Ever-Ready Hour 
to the La Palina program, to the A&P 
Gypsies, General Electric, General Motors 
— and now to Cities Service. 

The taxi halted at the hospital and Frank 
made his way to Patricia's room. She was 
a little dark-haired youngster whose face 
was white against the pillow. For years she 
had been crippled with a rare bone disease, 
but she told Frank — with hope shining 
forth from her large brown eyes — that, if 
this operation was successful, she would 
never have to worry about walking again. 
If it wasn't successful, she shrugged her 
shoulders and whispered, "God will find a 
way." 

Frank asked Patricia what she would 
like him to sing. 

"You sing your favorite song and it will 
be my favorite, too," she laughed. "I know 
that whatever you sing will be beautiful, 



and I will take it with me into the operat- 
ing room." 

When Frank stood in front of the micro- 
phone, the night before the operation, he 
whispered the words, "To Patricia," and 
with them went a silent prayer for her 
success. He sang "With a Song In My 
Heart" as he'd sung it many times before, 
but this time with a special wish that it 
would bring luck to someone who needed 
it worse than he ever had. 

The next afternoon, he phoned the hos- 
pital and found that Patricia had come 
through the operation with flying colors. He 
wrote her a note and from then on received 
reports on Patricia's progress. Through the 
months that followed, her legs healed. And, 
in the years that followed, she was gradu- 
ated from grammar school and high school, 
then went into college. Each letter would 
be signed, "Patricia — With a Song In My 
Heart," and Frank came to think of it as 
much Patricia's song as his. 

The years passed and Frank moved to 
the Good Gulf, Chesterfield and Coca-Cola 
shows and reached the pinnacle of his 
success as the fresh-guy tenor on the Jack 
Benny program. Then in 1950, after a re- 
tirement, he joined the Godfrey troupe. 

"Recently, I had another letter from Pa- 
tricia," Frank said, as he concluded the 
story, "but this one was signed a little 
differently. At the bottom she wrote, 'With 
a Song In My Heart' and then she had 
penned another line of the lyrics — 'Heaven 
opened its portals to me. . . .' For a moment 
the significance escaped me until I picked 
up the second envelope that had fallen out 
of the letter. Opening it and unfolding the 
heavy note-paper inside, I found an invita- 
tion to Patricia's wedding. A perfect end- 
ing, a wonderful experience for both of us." 



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I felt the decision was up to Sandy. So did Mother. But events wrote 



Being an older man, I was probably the only mem- 
ber of the Carter family who came close to feeling 
relieved when my kid sister Sandy went off and 
married Dave Elliott. Being the oldest of a fairly 
large tribe — young Peter, Sandy herself, Clay, Vir- 
ginia and myself — I suspected Mother and Father were 
getting a bit restless about the scarcity of weddings 
around our place. Peter, of course, was still in school, 
and Clay struggling with classes at the university; but 
Ginny and I were certainly eligible. I don't think 
Mother and Dad considered Sandy ready for marriage. 
Since Ginny had just started on a new job and I had 
various other matters on my mind, I welcomed the 
pleasant fuss that Sandy's elopement gave rise to. We 
all agreed Dave was a very nice boy. Truthfully, 
there wasn't a lot more any of us knew about him . . . 
except his family. The fact that Dad knew Mr. Elliott, 
business-wise, certainly saved Sandy a lot of trouble. 
I guess in a way it was Dad's feeling that he wanted 
to do something important, something especially won- 
derful for Sandy that started the trouble. It would 
certainly have come up, anyway, being the kind of 



trouble it was . . . but it just happened to be Dad who 
started the ball rolling. 

The morning I first heard about Dad's plan I knew 
before I sat down to breakfast that something was up. 
I know what it portends when Dad sits frowning over 
his coffee, and Mother's forehead gets slightly ruffled. 
It's true that, since I've started working on my book, 
my ear hasn't been as close to the family ground as 
it used to be, but I haven't lost the knack of smelling 
disturbance in the household air. I knew if I just 
waited, sooner or later one of them would bring up 
the problem. I ate my eggs and, sure enough, before 
I began on my coffee, Mother said placatingly, "But, 
James dear, I'm not arguing about it. All I said was 
that I believe Dave has certain — well, feelings, strong 
feelings, about independence." 

"Well," Dad said argumentatively, "I fail to see how 
I'm interfering with his independence by making him 
a wedding present." 

"A rather substantial present." Mother caught my 
eye. "Your father is thinking of giving Dave and 
Sandy the lot next door, dear, to build on, and Mr. 



90 




the 

WOMAN 

in my house 



Sandy was in real trouble — 
the kind of trouble only a young 
bride can create. ^ as her love 



strong enough to win the fight? 



their own incredible solution. 



Elliott is going to give them the house. Have it built 
for them." 

I whistled. Building lots in Evanston, the Chicago 
suburb where we live, do not usually come in Christ- 
mas stockings. To say nothing of the house. 

"Nonsense!" Dad said. "After all, they're young — 
too young in my opinion, but that's water under the 
bridge, we won't go over that again — and it's my belief 
that parents must do what they can to help out. Mr. 
Elliott and I are fortunate to be able to do so much for 
our children. That's the way I look at it." 

"They seem quite fond of their little apartment," 
Mother said. But she had to admit, when Dad pressed 
her, that it really would be nice to have Sandy right 
next door. Almost like having her home again. . . . 

Not having thought much about it one way or the 
other, I was surprised to find that I seconded Mother's 
doubts. I felt a bit tentative about Dave Elliott my- 
self. He was a nice guy, rather sweet and so much in 
love you warmed to him for that alone . . . but it had 
once or twice occurred to me that perhaps he was too 
much in love. He seemed to clutch at Sandy. He 



By JEFF CARTER 



was always acutely aware of what she was doing, to 
whom she was talking, even when it was just us — the 
family. Clay, grumbling over the loss of his beloved 
Sandy, to whom he'd been very close, had complained 
to me that he thought Dave was actually jealous of 
the family. "Honest. Jeff," he'd said, "the guy doesn't 
look as though he likes it when I drop in just to say 
hello. Sandy's own brother. Can you beat that?" 

And something told me Dad's princely presentation 
• wasn't going to get the reception he expected. 

It was a couple of days later that Sandy came to see 
me in my workroom up at the top of the house. 

"Busy? I'll go away if I have to," she said. "But I 
haven't been up in quite a while — " 

"I'm nattered you'd toil up all those stairs to see 
me." Sweeping some books off the studio couch. I 
made a place for her. "There you are. How've you 
been — and Dave?" 

Woman in My House is heard M-F, 4:45 P.M. EDT, over NBC: 
for Sweetheart Soap. Members of the cast, as pictured here, 
include: Les Tremayne as Jeff Carter. Shirley Mitchell as 
Sandy, and Janet Scott as their mother, Jessie Carter. 



91 



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"Oh, pretty well." Little-girl-wise, she 
tucked one long slim leg beneath her and 
swung the other idly, and I filled my pipe 
and waited. Sandy had a faintly discon- 
tented, puzzled expression. 

"Trouble, Sandy?" 

She sighed. "I don't know. I guess 
people can be an awful problem to — to 
other people. To the people they're mar- 
ried to, or the parents of. And vice 
versa." 

"So I gather," I said. "What's up, dear? 
The world breathing hot on your neck 
these days? Some one named James Car- 
ter, perhaps?" 

"And someone named Dave Elliott. I 
mean — every marriage has its problems, I 
guess. Dave and I are getting alone fine. 
It's just this house business coming up 
now. Dave's so horribly stiff-necked and 
funny about it, and I don't want to hurt 
Dad for the world — and anyway, Jeff, why 
should I? I'm crazy to have a wonderful 
house like that, right next door to us 
here." She pleated her cotton skirt with 
nervous fingers. "But the minute they told 
us, I just knew how it would hit Dave. 
At least I've learned that much, anyway. 
I don't always know just why a thing's 
going to upset Dave, or how he'll show it — 
but, by gosh, I can tell what's going to do 
it. See it coming a mile away. That's not 
bad for such a new wife, is it?" 

Genuinely impressed, I said, "It's better 
than that, Sandy. From what I hear, plenty 
of wives never get that far by their golden 
anniversaries." 

"Oh, but Dave's complicated, Jeff." She 
shook her head. "Not like us. He's al- 
ways searching around for hidden motives 
and seeing things that just aren't." I said 
nothing. 

"He thinks I'll still be too much part of 
the Carter family if we live next door." 
Sandy stood up and shook her skirt into 
place. Coming close, she put her hands 
on my lapels and pleaded down into my 
eyes. Why does a woman always take 
you by the collar when she's going to ask 
you to do her a favor? I've never seen it 
fail. 

"Jeff," she said, "Dave thinks you're the 
best. Would you . . . could you talk to 
him?" 

I wanted to laugh, but I was careful not 
to. After all, this was genuinely a big 
problem in Sandy's life. I knew Dad, and 
he just would not be able to understand 
it if Dave stood up for his point of view. 
Dad would never feel quite the same 
toward his new son-in-law . . . and Sandy 
was awfully young. A little stiffness be- 
tween Dad and Dave, and Sandy would 
never rest. She'd begin to feel that one or 
the other of them was responsible for mak- 
ing her unhappy. And, whichever one she 
turned against, it couldn't be good. Dad 



loved her deeply. We were an unusually 
close family. And Dave . . . Dave was the 
man she had chosen. The kids deserved 
a chance. It was too bad, in a way, that 
Dad and Mr. Elliott felt so helpful toward 
them. . . . But what tickled me was my 
young sister's purely instinctive guile. 
The hands creeping up my lapels — the 
pleading, hopeful eyes. . . . 

Just what I was going to say to Dave 
I didn't know. As a matter of fact, to 
this day nobody knows about the time I 
"accidentally" bumped into Dave and had 
lunch with him downtown. He was a nice 
boy, my brother-in-law — quiet, serious, 
and pretty obviously emotional. His dis- 
turbance over the house-and-lot proposi- 
tion was so urgent in his mind that it 
wasn't hard to get him to talk about it. 

"I know your father means to be help- 
ful, Jeff," Dave said. "Helpful! That's a 
weak word for it! It's a royal gesture, no 
mistake — from my father, too. But that's 
just it! Sandy's my wife now." His fresh 
color deepened a little; the words still 
couldn't be uttered without self-conscious- 
ness. "My wife. Look, Jeff — if you had 
one, wouldn't it mean that it was up to 
you to give her things? Whatever she gets 
ought to come from me, from my work 
and abilities. It oughtn't to be handed her 
on a silver platter." 

"It's coming to you, too, Dave," I pointed 
out. "I admit it's a big thing to be given as 
a wedding present, but have you thought 
how much ahead it'll put the two of you?" 
He opened his mouth and I went on hastily, 
"Understand me, I'm with you funda- 
mentally. Sandy's yours now, and vice 
versa. The two of you are responsible to 
and for one another, and nobody else. But 
there's nothing to stop you from accom- 
plishing everything you hope for, just be- 
cause you're lucky enough to start off a 
couple ahead of the game." 

"But I haven't put us there. It's not — " 
he gestured helplessly. "I don't know. 
Maybe I'm wrong. But this makes Sandy 
still James Carter's daughter, and me still 
Elliott's son. I want us to be Mr. and 
Mrs. Elliott, on our own. Don't you see?" 

Looking at him, I had a sudden qualm. 
What was I doing here, anyway? I couldn't 
advise Dave. I was on his side. "It's your 
problem and Sandy's, Dave," I said firmly. 
"Myself, I think maybe you're stressing it 
more than it's worth. When you get to 
my ripe age — " I grinned to take the pa- 
ternal weight out of the words — "you pick 
up the trick of riding with it. You know 
— you roll with the punches. You don't 
buck it. Wastes energy. But — " I finished 
my second cup of coffee and shrugged. 
"It'll work out. And if I can do anything, 
Dave — Sandy knows I'm available. To 
both of you." 

For better or worse, Nature took the 



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decision out of Sandy's hands. It seemed 
to me only a short time afterwards the 
whole family was all excited over the baby 
Sandy was going to have. And before I 
had quite focussed the picture of Sandy, 
almost a kid herself, as a mother, the other 
news came fast on its heels. Dave had 
made up his mind; with many thanks, the 
young Elliotts were going to accept the 
lot, and work was to start at once on their 
built-to-order house. 

I walked around the lawn with Sandy 
the afternoon she told us the news, and 
I didn't comment on the fact that Dave's 
surrender hadn't sent her rocketing to the 
moon. She was happy, but quietly, and 
it was mostly the baby. She didn't seem 
to want to talk much about the house. "It 
will be beautiful, at least it is on paper. 
And mostly, of course, it'll be so wonderful 
for the baby." 

"Just — the baby? You mean you and 
Dave aren't calling it Oswald or Scher- 
merhorn or one of those other cute names 
people usually hang on to their unborn 
children? For easy reference?" 

"No," said Sandy softly. "Just . . . the 
baby. Our baby." And something about 
the way she said it wiped the smile off my 
face. Maybe I could see Sandy as a 
mother, after all. The serious softness 
in her manner was something altogether 
new. We strolled in silence for a while. 
Then Sandy said, "That's what did it, you 
know, Jeff. What made Dave agree to 
take the house." 

"I see." 

"Do you think it matters, Jeff?" She 
clasped both hands over my arm and 
looked up a me. "He wouldn't have given 
in otherwise. Does that mean his de- 
cision is sort of — well, not valid? He didn't 
want the garden or the terrace for us." 
Her lips quivered slightly. "But he 
couldn't resist the thought of the baby 



out there. And it'll be so wonderful to 
have Mother right here next to me, when 
I need her. He — understood about that. 
But it wasn't blackmail . . . was it, Jeff? 
It's Dave's child, too. He couldn't bear 
it to have less than the best we could do 
for it." 

Mother was in her element, helping 
Sandy with plans for the decoration. "Say, 
save some of this enthusiasm for my 
house," I teased her one day, when I found 
her busily crayoning a living-room plan 
to test color values — whatever that meant. 
She patted my cheek. 

"Darling Jeff, you can't fool me with 
that sort of talk. I've almost despaired of 
ever seeing you settled in a house of your 
own. The longer a man remains a lone 
wolf, Jeff—" 

"I know, I know," I said hastily. "Any- 
way, it's not the same with a son, is it, 
dear. My — er — wife would probably want 
to run the thing her way." 

"Jeff, stop teasing." Mother studied her 
plan, head on one side. "First catch your 
wife, and we'll discuss it. How do you 
like this coral, for a chair?" Without wait- 
ing for an answer, she gathered her odds 
and ends into a neat pile and put them 
on the table beside her. "Want to come 
over and look at the house with Sandy?" 

Having put in a fair quota of work, I 
said I'd be glad to. We walked over and 
found Sandy already there, conferring with 
a patient mason who was losing time while 
he explained a few trade secrets into 
Sandy's attentive ears. When she joined 
us she was laughing, and I thought for the 
dozenth time that the things one reads 
about motherhood are apparently true. 
Surely Sandy had never been beautiful 
before. Pretty, yes; but not with this 
luminousness that hit you between the 
eyes. 

"Jeff, I'm so glad — I wanted to show you 



this little sort of half-staircase thing. 
Look." She led us over a collection of 
lumber and bricks, unconscious of the 
nervous hand I put out to steady her. 
"Here," she said, and explained in de- 
tail. I had only a vague idea what she 
was talking about, but I was openly im- 
pressed with the professional approach she 
had picked up. 

"You sound like a builder's apprentice, 
grade one," I said admiringly. "Come over 
and run me up a little number as soon as 
you get some free time. Something simple, 
say three rooms and a swimming pool." 

Sandy, arm around Mother's shoulders, 
laughed. "It's all in whose house it is," 
she said. "When it's your very own, being 
built right before your eyes, you get to 
feel that every stick and stone of it has 
a personality. Oh — and look," she went 
on. "This wall is going to overlook — " 

"Sandy," Mother said. "Please, dear. 
Not up there." 

"Mother, I'm not taking chances. Really. 
I've done this so often I can do it with my 
eyes closed." 

"Well, don't," Mother said, very sharply 
for her. She bit her lip, and I knew she 
was holding back a good old-fashioned 
remonstrance about Sandy's "condition." 
As a matter of fact, I wished Sandy would 
quit leaping around over those sharp- 
edged materials quite so lithely, but after 
all she was the one who was having the 
baby. I turned away to a blueprint tacked 
up on a bare stud, and just to amuse my- 
self I was trying to read the thing when 
suddenly there was a sharp confusion of 
noises. A scuffle, a shriek, a gasping, "Oh, 
dear God!" from Mother . . . and, simul- 
taneous with the other sounds, a sickening- 
ly dull thud. I whirled and closed my eyes 
for a split second on the sight I had al- 
ready envisioned. Sandy's blue frock 
sprawled incredibly at Mother's feet . . . 



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the folds still settling from the wind of her 
fall, but her body moving not at all. 

"Jeff," Mother whispered. "Jeff, Jeff . . ." 
Then the workmen were running toward 
us and Sandy's green-white face, with its 
closed eyes, was sickeningly chill and clam- 
my beneath my frantic palm. I thought 
nothing at all except the split-second suc- 
cession of things that had to be done. 

We got her to the hospital so fast she 
didn't even come to. And then the wait- 
ing began. The faces in the waiting room: 
Mother, white and fiercely restrained: Dad 
biting his lip in distraught helplessness, 
Clay ready to fight someone, anyone, for 
having let this happen to Sandy . . . and 
Dave. I found I couldn't look at Dave. It 
was frightening to see a man suffer so, and 
not be able to do a thing to help. We 
couldn't do anything; we could only pray 
that the doctors and nurses who had closed 
in around Sandy like a protective cordon 
were not in the same position. Nobody 
brought us news. We could only sit and 
wait, each praying in our separate ways, 
the unmistakable smell of a hospital bear- 
ing in upon us with its too-important mes- 
sages of life and death. . . . 

When a bland-faced nurse finally 
brought us some information, I felt the 
tension slacken as vividly as though I had 
actually had my hand on a tightening rope. 
Mother disappeared, into Sandy's room, 
and Dave, and then finally we had to leave. 
But Sandy was going to be all right. That 
was definite; they didn't want her doing 
too much talking right then, but she was 
going to be all right. 

Driving back home, Dave said stum- 
blingly, "It's unbelievable. So fast . . . when 
I left her this morning, she was . . . and 
now. . . ." He shook his head like a be- 
wildered puppy. "The doctor said the 
baby — " he choked abruptly and looked at 
me in surprise. "I'm sorry, Jeff." 

"For heaven's sake, what for!" I snapped. 
My own nerves weren't at their best 
at the moment. "Yell if you want to. 
Break something. I would if I were in 
your place." Then I softened, and said, 
"First things first, Dave. Sandy's okay; 
that's the big thing." 

Dave looked at me, his heart in his 
eyes. "What else?" he asked simply. "But 
it's Sandy I'm thinking of. She wanted 
that baby so . . ." 

Yes, the big thing was that Sandy was 
okay. True enough. But the baby — she'd 
lost that. A ten- foot fall with only a bump 
on the head to show for it was getting off 
pretty lightly. Except for that detail . . . 
the baby. They'd both been counting so 
heavily on that baby. I wondered sadly 
how they would come through the shock. 



Sadly, and I'm afraid with an anxious fore- 
boding. It had seemed from the beginning 
such an awfully frail, delicate little mar- 
riage. . . . 

But Sandy surprised me. At least while 
she was in the brisk, no-nonsense atmos- 
phere of the hospital. Each time I saw her 
there was more color in her cheeks, less 
dark shadow around her eyes. The shadow 
in the eyes didn't disappear, but it dimmed; 
and to me she only talked about the baby 
once. She wanted to know what I thought 
of Dave's reaction. 

I smiled reassuringly. "You two must 
be in love," I told her. "Dave's chiefly 
worried about you, and you're apparently 
in the same boat about him. That's the 
best recipe I know for not worrying about 
oneself ... to be concerned for someone 
you love." 

"Yes." She smiled fleetingly. "Poor 
Dave. He wanted ... he was so proud. 
It was completely his, you see — his and 
mine. Free from any other claims in the 
whole world." She turned away sud- 
denly. "I'm afraid, Jeff. He doesn't even 
know it himself, but I — oh, Jeff, I just feel 
it in my heart that he thinks it was my 
fault. I know it, Jeff." 

Her voice had sharpened and I was dis- 
mayed. "Darling, that's beyond sense and 
reason." 

She stiffened beneath the covering. "I 
know it," she insisted. Then, with delib- 
erate effort, she relaxed. "We do love 
each other. We can have another child. 
I've been saying it over and over as I've 
been lying here, as if I were a little girl 
clutching a lucky coin." She patted my 
hand. "We'll be all right, Jeff." 

So I was more than a little disturbed 
when Sandy made her decision and came 
home to our house. Oh, common sense 
and convenience and what-all made it 
a fairly reasonable thing to do. And yet 
... it was inconvenient of me, but I kept 
seeing things from Dave's point of view. 
Alarmed, I watched and waited and picked 
up what information I could without 
asking too many questions. Nobody could 
have told me anything, not even Sandy, 
who was still too weak to be interested 
in examining her own motivations. Some- 
where below the surface, far below, there 
must be stirring the beginning of a de- 
tachment from Dave. Convenient and 
sensible as her choice was, I was certain 
she wouldn't have made it if being with 
Dave was as important to her as — well, 
as I felt it ought to be. 

Still, what did I know? I wasn't married 
to either of them. Or to anybody else. I 
was like a sidewalk superintendent con- 
vinced he could dig that particular ditch 




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better with one hand tied behind him. . . . 
Sandy puzzled me. There was a quiet- 
ness, almost a coolness, about her. She 
was still sweet, and pretty, though her 
face was thin; and from the little I saw 
of her with Dave, her affection for him 
was as strong as ever. And yet . . . and 
yet I was frankly afraid to get into a 
discussion with her about anything im- 
portant. Like Dave. Or the future. 

It was Sandy herself who finally brought 
it up. She told me one day that she was 
practically ready to go home. 

"I'm delighted," I told her, and I didn't 
try to hide my emphasis. "I'm glad you're 
well enough, Sandy — even if you're not 
quite well enough, from a strictly physical 
point of view." 

She gave me a scber, sidelong glance. 
She had been wearing street clothes for 
the past couple of days, and she no longer 
looked in the least invalid-ish; not even 
the ribbon tied round her hair made her 
look quite as girlish as she had just a few 
weeks before. 

She said slowly, "You didn't think I was 
going at all, ever, did you." 

"I never thought that far ahead," I said. 

"I did. For one short horrible mo- 
ment. . . ." She shivered. "But not any 
more. There's nothing like touching bot- 
tom for making you see the black and white 
of things. I mean — when I was so weak 
and cranky, it was still Da 'e, Jeff. Even 
though I haven't gotten over knowing that 
he thinks it was my fault — no, he does, 
Jeff. He doesn't even know it himself. 
You have to blame a thing like that on 
someone, maybe . . . but it doesn't matter 
really." 

"What does matter, Sandy?" 

"Us." Frowning, she tried to explain. 
"Dave and me. I've gotten to see that you 
don't toss over a marriage the first time 
something shakes you. We mac e a decision 
when we got married — put ourselves into 
a kind of framework. I don't know if I 
can make it clear. I'm still sure the frame- 
work is good. I know I love Dave, and he 
loves me. So everything that happens 
has to be kind of fitted in bad or good, it 
doesn't matter. You don't jump out of the 
frame because you suddenly discover when 
the first crisis hits. You try to adjust 
within the frame . . ." She gave up, and 
made a vague gesture. "I can't do it with 
words, I'm afraid." 

"You're doing beautifully," I said, and 
I meant it. Little Sandy, I thought . . . not 
by any means so little any more. I was 
just about to tell her I was sure she and 
Dave would make out all right, when she 
stopped me with a slight squeeze of her 
thin little hand on mine. 

"I know how you feel, Jeff, and thanks 
— but don't be reassuring right now." She 
met my eyes steadily. "Not that way. 
Not patting little Sandy on the head. You 
see — I don't think I need that any more. 
I used to run to you for comfort, or to 
Mother, or to Clay . . . but you can't go 
on doing that all your life." Straighten- 
ing, she drew away from me. "Things 
happen to change you. You can't get com- 
fort from a pat on the head any more. 
You need a different kind of comfort — 
the kind you get when it suddenly strikes 
you that even if things don't go well you 
just might be able to manage them. You 
. . . you grow up, I guess. Sometime." 

"Yes," I said quietly. "You certainly do. 
If you're strong — and lucky — you grow up." 
Of course, we didn't dream of the greater 
tragedy which was to come. Sandy had so 
little luck, she needed all her strength. A 
girl -wife had to grow up — to face all that 
the future had in store for Sandy. That 
day, I only thought: You've grown up, 
Sandy. This is your day of days. 



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{Continued from page 59) 
of a writer's imagination who, as a parent, 
gets himself into impossible situations but 
somehow acquires a certain infallibility. 
He may never get to be president, but he's 
nearly always right in the end. 

To a humorous and often bewildered 
parent of Bob Young's type, the simple 
and humorous ease with which script 
writers deal with problems presented by 
youngsters is bound to prove embarrassing. 
The professional performance is so per- 
fect — like a concerto by Kreisler. The 
domestic performance can be so painful — 
like the fiddling of Benny. 

Says Bob, "That often-quoted gentle- 
man who was not a hero to his valet had 
a cinch. He should check his status with 
four daughters, all hep. He'd soon learn 
that it is possible for clay feet to reach aU 
the way to a bright red neck." 

Bob speaks from real-life experience. 
Recently, the entire Young family, while 
on vacation at a summer resort, decided 
to try their bowling luck. The two older 
girls (Carol, eighteen, and Barbara, four- 
teen) got along fine, but Bob felt that 
Betty Lou, eight, and Kathy, six, could 
profit from some instruction. Which he 
would gladly supply. 

He explained to Kathy, "Don't let the 
ball get away from you. Grasp it firmly 
and send it straight down the center of 
the alley so that it catches the first pin a 
little to the left. . . ." 

Kathy tried it, but even the duck-pin 
ball was somewhat too heavy for her. 
Repeatedly, the ball flew to the side of 
the alley and rolled down the gutter for 
a zero score. 

"Keep it out of the gutter," Bob in- 
structed. "See, it's easy. Straight down 
the lane." 

The older girls suggested that Bob get 
into the game. He agreed. His first effort 
sent the ball down the left gutter. His 
second pitch sent it down the right. 

Kathy's spine stiffened and her eyes 
opened wide. "Well! Why does Daddy 
do the very same thing he has told us 
not to do?" she inquired of her mother. 

"Better ask him," said Mother, main- 
taining a straight face. 

Further whittling down to size took 
place when Bob decided to show his family 
a good time by taking them to Chasen's, 
one of Hollywood's most celebrated res- 
taurants, for dinner. Bob wanted to quiet 
the din set up by Carol and Barbara, who, 
considering themselves young ladies, had 
long been eager to visit some of the spots 
about which they had read in motion pic- 
ture magazines and newspaper theatrical 
columns. 

Once established in a booth, Bob noticed 
that, while the two younger girls were 
making a great show of pretending to 
read the boxcar-sized menus, the two 
older girls were, in a restrained and lady- 
like way, craning their necks. 

"What on earth are you two expecting— 
a floor show?" he wanted to know. 

"We're looking for celebrities," they 
murmured, breathing shallowly. "There 
are supposed to be famous people here all 
the time." 

The man who has been a matinee idol 
for fifteen years winked at his wife, ad- 
justed his tie, and inquired, "Well, how 
about me?" 

Without bringing their questing glances 
back to the table, both girls waved dis- 
missing hands in his general direction and 
chuckled, "Oh, you! You're just Daddy." 

Occasionally, the good-natured teasing 
of his four daughters has been of profes- 



sional aid to Bob. Some time ago he was 
awarded the Theatre Guild role of Dr. 
Gaston Chevalier, inventor of the bron- 
choscope. 

The thirty-minute play consisted of a 
highly dramatic episode in the life of Dr. 
Chevalier; there was only one catch — the 
word "larynx." 

For years Bob had pronounced it "lar- 
nix," instead of "lar-inx." 

He took the problem home. He read 
the script aloud repeatedly to any member 
of the family who would listen. A game 
developed. "Good morning, Daddy, how is 
your lar-inx this morning?" the girls 
would ask at breakfast. Or, "You're 
wanted on the telephone, Daddy. Don't 
strain your lar-inx." Or, "We skate on 
ice-rinks, but cold germs skate on the 
lar-inx. Ain't nature grand?" 

In the script, the word appeared eighteen 
times, but the night of the show, actor 
Robert Young went sailing through the 
performance without a single hesitation, 
thanks to the coaching provided for father 
Robert Young. 

Not only have the girls helped Bob's 
radio work, but occasionally Bob's radio 
work has proved to be of real help to the 
girls. So far, Barbara, the fourteen-year- 
old, has been the major beneficiary. 

Barbara is probably the friendliest, of 
the brood. She loves people, people love 
her right back, and somehow she seems 
to mingle their lives with hers. And their 
belongings. 

Of course she always returns whatever 
she borrows, but the pink-slip-or-a-pair- 
of-nylons routine is discouraged by the 
faculty of Barbara's school. The head- 
mistress wrote to Bob, suggesting that a 
parental word might bring about a needed 
reform. 

By the happiest coincidence, the script 
for that week's episode of Father Knows 
Best dealt with borrowing. It was a gay 
story, concluding with poor Father — after 
having straightened out the quandaries 
caused by the borrowing of other members 
of his family — discovering that the type- 
writer he had been using for months was 
also borrowed. 

Bob answered the headmistress' letter, 
thanking her for calling Barbara's problem 
to his attention, and asking her to make it 
possible for both Carol and Barbara to 
hear his program. 

This was arranged and produced a satis- 
factory result. To the best of everyone's 
knowledge, Barbara has given up borrow- 
ing entirely. She gathered the impression 
that the show had been planned and writ- 
ten for her express benefit and she was 
over-awed by the thought of a nationwide 
audience listening in on a parental lecture 
aimed at one small, brown-eyed girl sit- 
ting in her room in a private school in a 
small Southern California town. 

Another topic sometimes dealt with on 
Father Knows Best is the teen-age driver 
problem. In California, a youngster may 
secure a learner's permit at sixteen, but 
must be accompanied at all times by an 
adult, licensed driver. At seventeen, a 
licensed driver may drive alone. 

Although Bob said nothing, he expected 
Carol to request a course of driving lessons 
as part of her sixteenth birthday celebra- 
tion. She surprised Father by taking no 
interest in learning at all. 

When she was seventeen, Bob inquired 
gently about her intentions. She said that 
there always seemed to be someone around 
to take her anywhere she wanted to go, 
so she didn't see any reason for cluttering 
up traffic worse than it was. 

When she became eighteen, Bob felt 
that the time had come for her to learn 



to handle a car, on general principle. 

At this time, tragedy undertook a part 
in the drama. The seventeen-year-old 
daughter of a family well known to the 
Youngs crashed into a light standard and 
was killed. She had been driving to her 
school and her car had gone out of control 
on a curve. 

Horrified by the tragedy, Bob had a talk 
with Carol. "I suppose this discourages 
you completely," he said, hoping — in con- 
trast to his earlier attitude — that her 
answer would be yes. 

Thoughtfully Carol replied, "No, Daddy. 
These things happen every day. This 
particular accident seems more dreadful 
to us because we know the people in- 
volved. I don't think it should be allowed 
to change my plans. Besides, I've almost 
learned to drive from watching you. I 
think I'll be your kind of driver — cour- 
teous and careful." 

Any household in which teenagers exist 
is bound to suffer from a telephone crisis. 
Prepared in advance for this emergency 
by the script of one of his radio shows, 
Bob passed a rule: The two older girls 
were assigned a call quota. Once that 
quota was reached, each additional call 
was charged to the caller and she had to 
pay for it out of her weekly allowance. 

It was a just and simple arrangement at 
first glance. However, miscalculation be- 
gan to creep in. There were three, some- 
times four, times as many calls charged 
by the telephone company as the girls 
had logged in their private records. Even 
when Carol went away to school and Bar- 
bara was the lone sufferer from junior 
telephonitis, the bills did not diminish. 

Week after week, Barbara paid out her 
entire allowance after mild protest and an 
air of bewildered resignation. When Bob 
caught her talking, she often covered the 
transmitter with her hand and whispered to 
her father, "She called me. Honest!" 

Then Barbara also went to La Jolla to 
school, and still the telephone bills main- 
tained their customary peak. 

A little sleuthing revealed that the help 
was spending each afternoon in a talk- 
fest with friends and relatives at distant 
and expensive points. 

The following weekend, the Youngs 
flew south to La Jolla (Bob pilots his own 
Beechcraft Bonanza plane) to visit Carol 
and Barbara. Over the luncheon table, 
Father presented each of his daughters 
with a sizable check and a handsome 
apology. 

Said Barbara, "Gee, Daddy, you needn't 
give us this money. It's nice enough to 
know that you realize we were telling the 
truth. We were hurt to think you didn't 
believe us." 

Gulping a little, radio star Robert Young 
finally managed to say, "At least it's a 
switch. Usually you don't believe me." 

"When?" both girls demanded in chorus. 

"Whenever I say 'Father knows best.' " 

"Oh — that! You wanna know some- 
thing?" inquired Barbara. "Usually you do." 

What greater tribute could an adoring — 
although somewhat baffled — parent want? 



CINDERELLA SAILOR 

From the decks of a U. S. Navy 

aircraft carrier to a 

featured spot with Arthur Godfrey 

is quite a flight — but 

Julius La Rosa made it! 

Read all about this young singer, 

see him in full, natural color 

in the August issue of 

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Prince Charming of the Airwaves 



(Continued from page 39) 
Barbara's way of thinking about Ralph, 
and the two were married in August, 1939, 
in a simple New York wedding. 

Ralph managed to get a four-week vaca- 
tion from his forty-five shows so he and 
Barbara could visit his family in Oakland 
for their honeymoon — and so Barbara 
could meet the other members of his 
family (she had already met his mother, 
who had approved wholeheartedly of 
Ralph's choice) . So, one cool autumn after- 
noon, she alighted from the plane at the 
Oakland airport to be overwhelmed with 
brothers, wives, and children and what 
seemed to be hundreds of school friends 
of Ralph's who had come along to see 
"what Ralph had married." 

The gang lined up for greetings and in- 
troductions, and Barbara isn't certain to 
this day how many airline employees she 
kissed before she was finished, because — 
like Jack's beanstalk — the line greeting 
her just grew and grew. Just as Ralph 
had won over Barbara's family, so Barbara 
proceeded to charm his, and after a glori- 
ous honeymoon the two returned to New 
York. Ralph had arranged for his bride 
to move into his ex-bachelor quarters, 
which he'd previously shared with such 
radioites as Mel Allen and Andre Baruch. 



They all had willingly departed," 
laughed Barbara, "excepting one of the old 
group — George Putnam. He thought he 
should be allowed to stay. He'd mustered 
some pretty good arguments, but mine 
were better and so, finally, he departed 
too. To this "day, George is our dearest 
friend and I've never quite known whether 
or not he stayed on just to tease me.". 

With changes in the apartment's occu- 
pants came changes in its appearance, for 
Barbara, right from the start, made home- 
making her number one interest in life. 
The apartment became a comfortable cozy 
place, without benefit of the "big modern 
pieces men always seem to want to live 
with, though I'll never know why," Bar- 
bara footnotes. As nice as the apartment 
was, Barbara and Ralph then set their 
sights en a house, their first real home. 

Meanwhile, Ralph wasn't content to 
stand still. He wanted his own program, 
and a program meant having an idea. For 
a long time, Ralph had been mulling over 
an idea he'd had for an audience-partici- 
pation show based on the old parlor game 
he'd played as a child back on his family's 
Colorado ranch. During those early years, 
Ralph, his mother and his brothers had 
entertained themselves with a game called 
"Truth or Consequences." With hours of 
hard work, many, many meetings with 
important people, Ralph was at last able 
to convince the powers-that-be that this 
game would be as much fun today for 
radio audiences as it had been for his 
family. And he was so right. 

And so, on March 23, 1940, the radio- 
listening public heard and accepted Truth 
or Consequences and with it an engaging 
new radio personality whose star was to 
be in the ascendency for twelve years — at 
which time he was to top even his own 
record by putting on shows both in radio 
and television. In the early years, Barbara 
and Ralph bought a small home in the 
country, and Barbara shared with Ralph 
the struggles for success that were to bring 
him fame and fortune. 

Barbara loved to travel with Ralph on 
his tours and, even following the birth of 
Christine in April, 1942, Barbara still kept 
up with him. By the time Christine had 
reached the age of three, she had been 



across the continent three times. But that 
was before Garry, the second child, who 
was born October, 1943. "From then on, I 
sort of followed Ralph in big leaps, catch- 
ing him wherever I could manage it." 

Then came the biggest leap of all. Ralph, 
Barbara, Christine and Garry moved to 
California, where Ralph was to do parts 
in motion pictures and also carry on his 
Truth or Consequences show. In Beverly 
Hills, not many miles from the heart of 
the radio industry, Ralph and Barbara 
bought a lovely white-brick home where 
they settled down to a carefully planned 
life with their children, including little 
Laurie who was born a year later. 

"Ralph's schedule, with his new shows, 
closely follows that of a real business 
man's hours, which is fun for all of us. 
We start our day by eating breakfast to- 
gether and end it by sharing dinner," she 
says. 

"And Grandmother's worries that show 
folks just aren't for the parlor were all for 
nothing. Nothing could be further from 
the truth than the myth that show people 
live gay, tinsel-filled lives. Our children, 
home and the show fill our lives — in just 
that order. Of course, like most Americans, 
we love dining out occasionally, and once- 
a-year black-tie affairs when we exchange 
hellos with Gary Cooper and Joan Craw- 
ford are as thrilling to us as they would 
be to anyone else. Too, we like to entertain 
at home, more often than not at our con- 
venient barbecue patio." 

For Barbara, marriage with Ralph has 
been all the wonderful things she dreamed 
long ago, however, and in some ways much 
richer and fuller. Instead of the unreality 
of shining dreams, she has a devoted hus- 
band, an easygoing man about the house. 
"And what a devoted father," Barbara adds 
proudly. 

Not long ago, Ralph was to meet Bing 
Crosby for an important magazine layout. 
Busy Bing cautioned Ralph that the ap- 
pointment must be kept on the very hour 
of nine, for it was Crosby's only free time. 

Ralph called Bing before the appointed 
hour, asking, "What will happen if I'm 
fifteen minutes late?" 

"I'm sorry, Ralph," Bing said, "it's got 
to be nine." 

"Well," said Ralph, "I guess I'll have to 
sacrifice the story. My daughter is reciting 
at nursery school at nine, and I promised 
I'd be there." 

"Ah," laughed Crosby, "that's an excuse 
I can understand. Go ahead, Daddy Ed- 
wards, and I'll see you fifteen minutes late." 

The children naturally return their 
Daddy's love. Until very recently, they 
probably thought all Daddies were on the 
radio. But, as they are growing older, 
they are also becoming aware that their 
father is a celebrity. Barbara recalled that 
Christine came home from school one day 
to ask, "Are we very rich?" "What gave 
you that idea?" patiently asked Barbara. 
"Well," explained Christine," we do have 
three yards." Barbara surmised that she 
meant the front and back yards and 
fenced-in patio. "I soon set her straight 
by pointing out that many of our neigh- 
bors had much more: pools and tennis 
courts, for example. I maintained then, 
and still do, that middle-of-the-road 
thinking is best for all of us." 

So here is Barbara's dream come true. 
A dream also filled out with three lovely 
children — and this is really three dreams 
come true. And then, of course, there's 
that older man — you know, the worldly 
experienced one. But to Barbara, he's still 
her Prince Charming, whenever he comes 
a-riding the magic of the airways. 



I'm Going to Have 
a Baby 

(Continued from page 41) 
plan for living was the same as that of 
many other young couples who want a 
secure future. John's salary provided the 
necessities; my unpredictable income, 
which might be good one week but drop 
to zero the next, bought our luxuries. 

It was a break for us when NBC put 
Hawkins Falls on the air from Chicago 
and I was cast in the steady role of Millie 
Flagle. To John and me it meant we could 
set our personal timetable with more cer- 
tainty. Often we discussed having a baby. 

Television, however, is a demanding 
business. As my role made our financial 
budgeting easier, it also made my time 
more precious. My daily schedule began 
with getting John's breakfast and doing 
my housekeeping before rehearsal. It 
usually ended with a quiet evening at 
home. 

One day hurried so fast after the next 
that I was scarcely aware of the passage 
of time until the morning last fall when, 
dressing, I found I could not zip the skirt 
of my suit. "Darn it," I said to my hus- 
band, "I'm getting fat. I'd better start 
dieting." 

John started to laugh. "Before you 
starve yourself, hadn't you better see the 
doctor?" 

My program that day called for fast 
dashes from one place to another, but a 
hopeful husband deserves humoring, so I 
changed some appointments and away I 
went. I was still a bit flabbergasted when 
he came home that evening and I had to 
report, "What do you know! You were 
right. I am pregnant. Three months 
pregnant, in fact." 

"Fine," said John, "we'd better start 
planning." 

And that, for the moment, was that. It 
was an isolated piece of information which 
would eventually affect us but required 
no immediate action. To tell the truth, I 
don't think either of us really believed it. 

The Hawkins Falls version- of the same 
announcement was far more spectacular. 

The village, as you viewers may recall, 
was in the midst of a crime wave. Gang- 
sters held Laif and Millie Flagle, and other 
residents, hostage in a drug store. Suddenly 
I turned to Laif and burst out crying. "To- 
night I wanted to be home. Tonight I was 
going to tell you we're going to have a 
babeeee!" 

As Millie, I shook with sobs and, as Laif, 
Win Stracke moved .aster than people had 
ever before seen him move. Running to 
the counter, he bought a fistful of cigars 
and joyfully handed them out to every- 
one, villainous gangsters included. 

Before camera, it was a brief, intense, 
explosive scene. In contrast, the real-life 
drama was slower to develop, yet drama it 
is, for the essence of drama is change and 
the reaction of individuals to it. Already 
our baby has brought changes not only to 
John and me but to the people associated 
with us. 

In the beginning, those changes cen- 
tered around the well-known fact that 
babies cost money. Talking things over, 
we decided no, we would not buy a new 
car this year; yes, we would ask my cousin 
in New York to loan us her nursery equip- 
ment. She had lovely things and it would 
be cheaper to pay shipping costs than buy 
new furnishings of our own. 

Next question to be decided concerned 
Hawkins Falls. During the past summer, 
our producer, Ben Park, had often said, 
"I think Millie Flagle should have a baby." 
Ben, in his less serious moments, is an 




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awful tease, so customarily I replied, "I 
know what you're after. You just want a 
chance to show off how much you know 
about babies." His wife had just pre- 
sented him with their first son, and Ben, 
delighted, talked of nothing else during 
that period. 

Now confronted with the fact that, in 
real life, Mrs. John Twohey was pregnant, 
we must also determine just how far 
Hawkins Falls's realism would go and 
whether the televised Mrs. Laif Flagle also 
would obviously expect a baby. I was 
quite prepared to be written out of the 
script the day I beckoned and said, "Come 
here, Ben, I have something to tell you." 

We moved toward a corner. "Remember 
how you wanted Millie to have a baby? 
Well, she's going to. For real." 

At the news, Ben got far more excited 
than John had. It surprised me for I had 
no idea, back then, what changes a baby 
brought. Ben, already one of the knowing 
ones, beamed. Beamed as though someone 
had turned on a spotlight back of his face. 

"That's great. Just great," he said. "We'll 
have the first real baby on television. But 
don't tell anyone just yet. Give our writer, 
Bill Barrett, time to get it into the script." 



Bill, who lives in New York, told me the 
next time he came out to Chicago that, on 
hearing the news, he immediately bought 
all the baby books he could find and began 
studying. Next he consulted obstetricians 
and pediatricians. Before he finds out 
whether the Flagle heir is a boy or a girl. 
Bill, too, will be an expert on babies. 

Remaining in the show made my ma- 
ternity wardrobe important. I've always 
been the kind of person who saw some- 
thing in a window, dashed to buy it and 
worried later how it would fit into my 
helter-skelter wardrobe. 

Finding out that this would no longer 
work was the first lesson the baby really 
taught me. On my way to rehearsal one 
day, I bought a smock and a frilly apron. 
Happy as a kid with her first formal, I put 
them on. My happiness lasted as long as 
it took to glance into the monitor. I just 
plain looked sloppy. 

Something had to happen. I wanted to 
look neat, yet I did not want to spend 
money which I considered rightfully be- 
longed to the baby. 

I ended up doing what fashion experts 
always advise. I bought two suits, a gray 
flannel and a brown men's-wear fabric. I 
also selected three pairs of very good shoes 
— the kind which are smart yet comfort- 
able for all the increased walking I knew 
I would do. With those as basic items, 
I then concentrated on inexpensive ac- 
cessories — collars, flowers, scarfs, ties, cos- 
tume jewelry. I bought a few cute little 
hats. Altogether, my cash outlay was 
smaller than I usually spend on one sea- 
son's clothes, yet by mixing and matching 
I have at least eight complete outfits. 

When friends say, "My goodness, Ros, 
you've never looked so nice," the answer 
is simple. I've never before taken so much 
care about how I look. Being pregnant is 
just like being an actress. I must dress 
for my role. Thanks to my baby, I'm using 
forethought and developing a better clothes 
sense. 

Up to that point I'd been doing about 
the same things I'd do if I were planning 
a vacation. The first change of a com- 
pletely different sort began when we chose 
an obstetrician. 

John and I are the kind of people who 
enjoy living today. We like modern fur- 
niture, modern ideas, and it followed that, 
when we read a book on "painless birth" a 
year ago, we were much impressed. Should 
we ever have a baby, that was for us. 

Yet, do you know, when the time came 



to make such a choice, we didn't even 
discuss the matter: I simply trotted right 
off to a doctor who had kept a number of 
my friends healthy and happy throughout 
their pregnancies and delivered them 
strong and thriving babies. 

When, after examination, I asked the 
inevitable question, "What can I do?" my 
physician answered, "Don't go horseback 
riding. Otherwise, continue your usual 
activities. Birth is a natural process and, 
if you don't fight it, Nature will take care 
of you." 

It was such a simple statement I failed 
to realize it also was far-reaching. Going 
in for my next checkup, I carried a little 
list of questions. "What about this, what 
about that?" 

He was always reassuring. "Perfectly 
natural. Just what should be happening." 
From being strange and a little frightening, 
it turned into an interesting unfolding of 
the secrets of birth. 

The increasing number of such physical 
changes led both John and me, when we 
were ready for it, to the much more mov- 
ing mental and emotional change. 

It's difficult to find words to describe 
that feeling. It was almost as though, 
having accepted, all these years, the fact 
that we were living, breathing, thinking 
individuals, we were just then discovering 
what it really meant to belong to the hu- 
man race. 

Maybe the best way to explain is to 
say that, living in the Atomic Age, we had 
been forced to accept man's ability to 
destroy and had, in that grim knowledge, 
forgotten God also gave us, through love, 
ability to create. 

Neither John nor I has ever been able 
to articulate about such an idea. Our 
religious training has been in two of the 
least demonstrative of churches, and John, 
particularly, is well disciplined in keeping 
himself to himself. Yet he was the first 
to express it. He looked up from one of 
our books and said quietly, "This isn't 
just physical. It's spiritual, too." 

Concentrating, as I had, on all the phys- 
ical and material aspects, I did not fully 
grasp his meaning. Maybe women aren't 
supposed to, at least not at first. Talking 
with some of my women friends, they tell 
me they've had similar experiences. It 
was the husband who first looked beyond 
the busy-ness of buying bassinets and 
bottles to speak, as John did, of the deeper 
significance. 

"Ros," he said, "you're carrying life. A 
child who may turn out to be a Lincoln, 
a Helen Hayes, or an ordinary everyday 
person. We don't know, for this individual 
has never before existed. This is a new 
human being." 

The thought frightened me at first. 

I could think of nothing in my life which 
would prepare me for such responsibility. 
Regardless of how many millions of per- 
sons had come into the world through the 
identical age-old miracle, I couldn't help 
feeling it was happening for the first time 
just to me. 

Then, gradually, in the next stage of the 
tremendous learning which accompanies 
birth, I began to understand every other 
parent must have realized the same thing, 
felt the same way, and that they all wanted 
to help. It has shown in so many little 
ways. 

Ben Park's attitude has been much the 
same as my doctor's. Everything's natural, 
everything's fine. Win Stracke, who plays 
Laif, and who in real life has two daugh- 
ters, told me his little girls can't decide 
whether they want to be aunts or cousins 
to the new baby. Crew men bring me snap- 
shots of their children and talk of how 
much fun they have with them. I have 
only to see Frank Dane take time out 
from his part as Knap Drewer and rough- 



house with his son, Bruce, to look forward 
to the day when Johnny will have the 
same close companionship with our child. 

Bernardine Flynn (Lona Drewer), real- 
life mother of two husky sons, has, of 
course, become an even closer friend. To 
the baby shower which she gave for me, 
she invited both the women in the cast 
and all the wives of the crew and staff. 
It turned out to be even a bigger event 
than the make-believe shower which Bill 
Barrett dreamed up for the show, which 
by strange coincidence was set for the 
identical day. 

This heightened friendliness extends 
even beyond the limits of Hawkins Falls. 
I've never been the big star people stop 
on the street, but now, since they've seen 
me as the pregnant Millie, women talk to 
me in the grocery store, ask me when the 
baby will arrive, and whether we hope 
for a boy or a girl. 

No one has done anything splashy or 
spectacular, but never have Johnny and I 
been so conscious of the brotherhood of 
man. There's a sense of kinship with other 
parents. That's what I mean by saying 
it's just as though we had newly joined 
an exclusive club — the human race. 

John and I often recall, these days, how 
when we were overseas we heard so many 
battle-weary G.I.'s say that all they wanted 
was to get home, fmd a good wife and 
settle down. 

We wonder now if they didn't mean far 
more than that. We ask ourselves if they 
weren't groping for the same idea which 
we, with the coming of our baby, are find- 
ing. Out of the turmoil of our times, we 
who were born into the Depression and 
grew up into war, pin our first fresh new 
faith to the fundamental family unit — a 
man, a woman, a child. 

Perhaps out of our desire to preserve 
that unit — a desire which we now know 
is shared with millions of couples like us — 
we may find our way, eventually, to peace 
and a better world. A world in which our 
child can grow in wisdom, strength and 
security. If that happens, we and every- 
one else can truly say, "Having a baby is 
wonderful." 



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All That Glitters Is Not Romance 



(Continued from page 32) 
feathery pillbox. "This would be lovely 
with the blue suit you have on, if you like 
pink," she said, her voice going flat. The 
abrupt change of manner caught my atten- 
tion. Trying the hat, I said, "Where is 
home, Miss. . . ." 

"Lydia. Lydia Kemp." She fingered the 
veil she was holding. "Franklinboro, Penn- 
sylvania. That's home. I'll bet you never 
heard of it." 

"Well, I—" 

"Who has?" Lydia asked, and now her 
tone was unmistakably bitter. "That's why 
I got out. Who wants to stick around in 
an old mudhole, live and die without ever 
doing anything or seeing anything? I guess 
it's okay if you're the type, but — " 

"And do you like New York, now that 
you're here?" 

Lydia removed some hats and put some 
others before me. "I like it all right," she 
said slowly. Then, hearing her own words, 
she stiffened. "I love it," she exclaimed. 
"It's just exactly as wonderful as I hoped 
it would be. I wouldn't go back for — for 
anything." 

I had already noted the small, shy gleam 
that came from the girl's left hand, ring 
finger, and I tried a long shot. "And does 
your young man like it, too?" I asked, 
slyly. 

Instantly Lydia put the hand behind her 
back and flushed. "I ought to take that 
thing off," she muttered. "I just haven't 
been able to bring myself to it yet — but I 
will. No, he doesn't like it; can't see it. 
That's why I'm here and he's there, I 
guess. Of course he's all set there. The 
Franklinboro General Store." Her soft lips 
bit at the words as though she hated them. 
"And I hope he's happy with it. Oh, but 
Miss Freeman, what's the matter with me! 
You said you were in a hurry, and here I 
am chewing your ear with my troubles — 
and there aren't even any troubles," she 
finished defiantly. "I'm perfectly happy. 
I knew I was right coming to New York. 
It's the only place in the world you can 
live like a human being." 

"Let's see that little white one again," 
I said. I had already made up my mind to 
take it, but there was something young 
and rather pathetic about Lydia Kemp 
that kept me talking to her for a while 
longer before I finally had to go. All 
through the cocktail party I kept thinking 
about her. Young and ambitious and so 
certain that all you had to do was come to 
New York with the right ideas and a will- 
ingness to work, and you just automati- 
cally were successful! It wasn't that her 
hopes were out of bounds, either. All she 
wanted was a hat shop of her own. Just 
a small one, she'd said, her thin face tense 
with eagerness. She'd work so hard, she'd 
have such unusual, beautiful hats, she had 
so many ideas . . . and she was saving. 
She'd only been in New York five months, 
but already she had saved quite a lot. 

"And what else have you done?" I'd 
asked. "Have you had fun, met people? 
This can be such a lonely place if you do 
nothing but work." 

She was inspecting the angle of my new 
hat, and she didn't meet my eyes. "Oh, 
I've been busy all the time. I mean I 
haven't had dates, but I. . . ." 

"You've been lonely, haven't you," I'd 
said, gently. 

"That doesn't matter." Lydia's hands 
clenched at her sides. "What matters is 
that I'll be here, not stuck back there 
among all the aprons and the backyard 
fences and the — the littleness of it. A girl 
can rely on herself here. Look at the girl 



you play, Wendy Warren — look at her! 
She makes her own living, she's as inde- 
pendent as a man, she doesn't need a man 
unless she wants company." 

"And yet, if you remember, even Wendy 
has had her lonely times," I'd reminded 
Lydia. "Times when she would have given 
a great deal for a husband and a family 
to be part of. Times when her career 
hasn't been the whole answer. . . ." Then 
I'd caught sight of my watch, and gasped. 
"That cocktail party will be over before 
I get there. I must fly." 

"That's what I mean," Lydia had said. 
"Some day, I'll be doing all those things, 
you'll see — going to lunch at the Colony 
and to cocktail parties and first nights. 
I'll be invited everywhere because of what 
I've accomplished, all by myself — not just 
because I'm someone's wife. And who 
wants to be anyone's wife in Franklinboro, 
anyway! A living death, that's what it is!" 

No, I hadn't been able to get her vehe- 
mence out of my mind. Dreams are won- 
derful, when you're young; but something 
told me Lydia Kemp was concentrating on 
the wrong dream. Her loneliness, the bone- 
deep aloneness of a girl who's always been 
part of a group and who, suddenly, is an 
outsider in a strange place where every- 
one is far too busy to make time for her . . . 
how bleak she had looked when she spoke 
of her hat shop, and in contrast how 
warmly animated when she spoke of Syd- 
ney's — that was her fiance — stubbornness. 
It was the warmth of anger, but it made 
her pretty. In a few years, if they were 
the kind of years she was looking forward 
to — filled with work and struggle and 
business-type complications of which at 
this point she couldn't even conceive — in 
a few years of that kind of life, Lydia 
Kemp would no longer be a pretty girl. 
I'd seen them, the successful business 
women who abound in New York, beauti- 
fully dressed, busy-busy-busy all the 
time — and many of them quite desolate, 
from the loneliness they had chosen. Oh, 
there are women here, plenty of them, 
who manage to run careers and save 
enough of themselves for families, too. But 
it takes a special type. There was some- 
thing lost about Lydia that made me feel 
she just wasn't cut out for that type of 
divided life. 

Perhaps what actually decided me on 
my course was . . . well, fate. I don't know 
how the charming little nose-veil on my 
new bonnet got itself torn. I didn't do it 
on purpose. But when I took it off that 
night, I noticed the tear, and immediately 
the plan took shape, as though it had been 
lurking in the corner of my mind awaiting 
release. I wore the hat again next day, 
and after the broadcast and a quick lunch 
at Colbee's with Tess Sheehan, who plays 
my Aunt Dorrie on the show, we went 
into the hat shop and I asked for Lydia. 
She came at once, looking very pretty and 
very young in a pale lilac cotton dress, 
and was quite concerned when I pointed 
out the damage. 

"I'll replace it," Lydia said. "Please sit 
down. I'll be just half a minute. . . ." She 
disappeared. Tess said idly, "Pretty kid." 
She began trying on some hats that were 
lying around and I smiled. It never seems 
to matter whether a woman is in the 
market for a hat or not; lead her to where 
they are and sort of unconsciously she 
immediately starts trying them on . . . just 
to see. 

"Yes, she is pretty," I agreed. "Now 
listen, Mary — quickly. No matter what I 
do or what I say, you back me up. Okay? 
Or rather don't say anything, but espe- 
cially don't act surprised." 

Tess's mobile face instantly registered 



complete surprise, but she disguised it 
swiftly as Lydia came back. Tess is an 
actress, thank heaven, I thought; just 
throw her a cue and her instinct will do 
the rest. 

"How was your party?" Lydia asked, 
fingers deftly busy with the hat. 

I shrugged. "Tiresome. Just a duty call. 
And I stayed too late out of sheer inertia, 
and had to rush my dinner, and couldn't 
keep awake later on — I wish I'd just gone 
to bed instead." 

Lydia's eyes flew wide. "But it sounded 
so exciting — and you looked so lovely! 
Oh, don't tell me any more! I spent the 
whole evening thinking of the wonderful 
party and the gay talk, and how you must 
all have gone on to dinner and had a tre- 
mendous time." 

"Like in the movies?" I laughed shortly, 
and I saw Tess's eyebrow quirk up as she 
caught the carefully-planned bitterness in 
my voice. "I'm sorry to be the one to tell 
you, Lydia, but the life of a New York 
career girl — even an actress — •" 

"A highly successful actress," Lydia put 
in quickly. 

"Well, even so — it's hardly all beer and 
skittles. I suppose I might have enjoyed 
myself if I'd had an escort — but you know 
how it is. It's never really fun to be a 
lone wolf, not for a girl." I measured 
Lydia's reaction covertly. "Not even the 
most successful woman in the world likes 
to arrive at a party alone." 

"But — " Lydia was biting her lips. 

I went on quickly, "It takes time to cul- 
tivate friends, and I just don't have the 
time, that's all there is to it. Men, I mean. 
Oh — I know hundreds of people in town, 
naturally; but you know, Lydia, to be a 
successful woman, or perhaps I should say 
a successful female — you've got to give 
part of your mind to it." 

Tess was practically reeling with aston- 
ishment, but she came nobly to my aid. 
"Men always know when a woman's mind 
isn't entirely on them," she offered wisely. 
"I don't know how they do it. She can be 
as smiling and attentive as all get-out — 
but, if she's thinking of the fight she had 
with the boss last week, well, they just 
sense it." 

"Oh, of course." I sighed wearily. "Well, 
you give up a lot for a career but you get 
a lot in return . . . they tell me." I laughed 
again. "Sometimes I wonder. You know, 
Tess — remember that man from Seattle, 
Keith whatever-it-was?" 

"The one who wanted to marry you?" 
Tess said brightly, and I shot her a grate- 
ful look. "Whatever happened to him, 
Wen — I mean Florence?" 

I shrugged. "Married that other girl. 
The one who was willing to give up her 
work and follow him clear to Seattle. They 
have several children now, I believe. 
Well — " I waved my hand airily. Lydia 
was staring at me large-eyed, the hat for- 
gotten in her hands. 

I leaned forward. "Is it finished? I've 
got to be on my way; some publicity pic- 
tures on the roster for this afternoon." I 
sighed heavily. "I wish some wonderful 
man would just sort of loom before me and 
sweep me off for dinner. I'm just in that 
mood today. Oh, well. . . ." 



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"You mean — " Lydia put in, "you mean 
you don't always get taken out to dinner? 
Even you, Miss Freeman?" 

I smiled up at her. "I've got the most 
colorful collection of trays you ever saw, 
Lydia. One for each night of the week. I 
have my dinner off one of them in front of 
the fire, and go over the next day's script, 
and after a while I read myself to sleep. 
You've just got to conserve your- energies, 
you know. You can't burn at both ends, 
as they say. It's one thing or the other, 
for most women, and — " I made my voice 
sound very faraway, "I've made my 
choice." 

"But — it's so confusing," Lydia cried. 
"I mean — oh, I suppose I've got you all 
mixed up with Wendy herself, and she's 
so contented and so important, with her 
work and everybody knowing her, and. . . ." 

Tess took a breath. "And do you think 
Wendy Warren has never cried herself to 
sleep at night?" she asked deeply. "Do you 
think she never wonders what her life 
would be like if she were — just somebody's 
wife, somebody's mother. . . ?" 

A few moments later, Tess and I found 
ourselves out on the street. "Oh, Tess, you 
were marvelous," I told her, "Thank you 
so much. The most wonderful support I 
ever had." 

"You might have briefed me a little," 
Tess grumbled. "After all, Florence, when 
you pulled that stuff about the trays, and 
the lonely firelight — in June, no less! — and 
all the time I could see in my mind's eye 
that wonderful dining room of yours with 
your husband and those two lovely girls 
and a boy, the blooming picture of a full, 
happy family life — " 

"Oh, I know, dear, but let me tell you 
why I did it." Briefly I filled her in on 
Lydia Kemp'; b: ;kground. "It was just 
an experiment, really. She's so full of 
notions at; ^ut big-city life. And at heart 
she's so lonely already; you can sense it. I 
think she ought to go back to her Sydney. 
But you can't hand out advice when you 
haven't been asked. This seemed like 
the least interfering way to sort of — well, 
nudge her along." 

"Well, I did think that business about 
Keith from Seattle was a little thick," Tess 
said. "But she seemed quite impressed." 

"Because she really envies the girl who 
married Keith," I said dreamily. "I mean 
— golly, Tess, I've got myself believing it! 
I've got to get home; the girls are doing 
the dessert tonight, and I simply mustn't 
be late." 

"Poor lonely Florence," Tess said, and 
we exchanged a conspiratorial goodbye 
and parted, to go our separate ways. 

From time to time I wondered, a trifle 
guiltily, if I hadn't been just a little harsh 
on Lydia's hopes. It was not my business 
or my responsibility to interfere in another 
life. But, for all I knew, I'd had no effect 
on her. It might be that she was truly a 
girl who could get along without fun, with- 
out love, if she just managed to grab off 
that glittering success that had will-o'-the- 
wisped her to New York. It might be that 
she'd be better off without Sydney of 
Franklinboro. . . . 

About a month later my curiosity over- 
flowed, and I stopped in at the shop again 
under the pretext of looking at Fall hats. 
I asked for Lydia. My salesgirl looked 
puzzled, and then said, "Oh, Lydia. I'm 
sorry, Miss Freeman, but she's gone. 
Queerest thing, too. Just suddenly gave 
her notice and left. Going back home, she 
said — and she'd seemed so terribly eager 
to learn the hat business here. Er — won't 
someone else do? We've got some de- 
lightful new things to show you. . . ." 

I smiled happily. "Oh yes," I told the 
salesgirl. "Someone else will do beauti- 
fully, thank you. Just show me something 
small and simple. . . ." 




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(Continued from, page 47) 
across the aisle, he said, "Here, have a 
mint." 

Toni's heart was turning flipflops. She 
accepted the candy and the conversation 
which went with it. He was a senior at 
Northwestern University, he volunteered. 
Toni's reply was carefully phrased. She 
was taking some courses at Mundelein. 

The bus reached her corner. He was 
right at her heels. "This is my street, too," 
he assured her. "Honest." 

Their homes, it developed, were just 
three doors apart. But, when young Buzz 
Immermann asked why he hadn't seen her 
before, Toni's answer was cagy. "I've been 
with my grandmother." That wasn't the 
whole truth, but it was useful. 

Inside the house, however, her pretenses 
dropped. Rushing to her mother, she 
shrieked, "Mom, I just met the dreamiest 
boy. But promise, Mom, you won't tell 
him. Promise." 



For Toni Gilman was, that March after- 
noon, a girl with a secret. She was doing 
her best to live two simultaneous lives. In 
one of them, she was Toni Gilman, actress. 

Once she had been adept in dividing her 
activities into separate, emotion-tight com- 
partments. As a disciplined actress, obedi- 
ent to direction, she could create with 
equal ease the characterization of an 
adolescent, an old crone or a woman of the 
world. As a fashion model before a camera, 
she could draw her supple body up into 
five feet, nine inches of concentrated ele- 
gance and compose her features into a 
beautiful blank calculated to focus atten- 
tion exclusively on a gown. Then, work 
completed, she could relax into private 
life as a bubbly, soft-faced youngster con- 
cerned only with beating her sister Lucy in 
a fast game of one-two-three-O'Leary. 

But that spring, subject to the fierce 
fires and sudden chills of being in love, 
her two personalities flowed in molten and 
uneven streams, a little girl one minute and 
a woman the next. 

With Buzz, she tried to be all woman, for 
always she carried the fear he would find 
out she was only thirteen, a kid where he 
was a college man. Simple geography put 
the first dent in her defenses. She was 
forced to admit the Mundelein she referred 
to so airily was not the college by Lake 
Michigan but the Mundelein Cathedral 
High School located on the near north side. 
She tried to cover with references to its 
being convenient to the radio stations. She 
also was deliberately vague about her 
studies and made it a point never to carry 
the textbook of an identifiably freshman 
subject. . 

Yet, at the same time, she betrayed her- 
self as all little girl in her love of sweets. 
Buzz and Toni formed the habit of leaving 
the bus at the drugstore corner and lin- 
gering over so many chocolate milkshakes 
that they each gained fifteen pounds. 

And, occasionally, her two real-life roles 
erupted into open conflict. 

Loneliness touched off the first explosion. 
As Buzz's final examinations approached, 
he spent more time in library and labora- 
tory, often missing their regular bus. Toni 
languished in mournful moodiness, certain 
some attractive co-ed was responsible. The 
day their schedules again coincided, her 
rush of joy at seeing Buzz turned, per- 
versely, into a flash of temper. Giving him 
an icy stare, she demanded, "Where in the 
world have you been?" 

Weariness made his answer terse. 
"Studying." 

Toni tossed her head. "What am I sup- 
posed to do about it?" 



"Well, you could write me a letter. A 
love letter." 

Toni's mobile face reflected the inner 
war between child and woman. The woman 
won. Defiantly, she tore a corner from 
her notebook and pencilled a satiric mes- 
sage: "April 25. Dearest Buster, I am at 
a loss for words to tell of my affection for 
you so I will close and sign, With Love, 
Toni." The script was neat, controlled, 
angry. 

But the impulsive little girl in her also 
demanded expression. For a moment, she 
hesitated, then with a dash added, "XXX" 
— a whole line of kisses from margin to 
margin. Kisses which contradicted and 
changed the meaning of the tidy script. 

Buzz's laugh choked in his throat. Seri- 
ously, he said, "I'll keep this." He folded 
the paper, placed it in his pocket. "It's my 
first love letter, too." 

In one respect, however, tempestuous 
young Toni was extremely fortunate. Acci- 
dental as their original encounter had been, 
she found in Buzz one of the few young 
men who could have not only the heart 
to sense the conflicts which disturbed her, 
but also the background to understand 
them. 

Her list of career credits, which might 
either have intimidated or over-impressed 
another lad, seemed perfectly natural to 
him. Theatre was in his blood, too. His 
father, Elmer Immermann, was an execu- 
tive of the Balaban and Katz circuit and 
Buzz became an usher as soon as he was 
big enough to fit into braid-trimmed pants 
and fasten a monkey coat over a wing- 
collared dickey. When he chose msdicine 
as his future, his father encouraged the boy 
and indicated he was willing to shoulder 
the financing of such an education. Inde- 
pendent Buzz had said, "Thank you, but 
no," and continued to work nights at the 
theatres. When Toni met him, he was 
manager at the neighborhood Howard. 

Well -accustomed to show people and 
their ways, he knew child stars often had 
their schooling interrupted and accepted 
without documentation Toni's tale of her 
"special courses." Believably, she might 
be sixteen, nineteen, even twenty. He did 
not ask. In the theatre, an actress's age is 
her own business. 

Toni, carefully as she avoided the sub- 
ject, worried about it and was correct in 
one respect. Buzz was beginning to wonder 
exactly how many years this confusing, 
upsetting, delightful, contrary woman- 
child had lived. But, as he did with every- 
thing else that spring, he postponed find- 
ing out until after his exams. He couldn't 
even think of dates. 

So Toni had to center her hopes on the 
finish of his examinations. Surely then 
Buzz would ask her for a date. Instead, 
the great day, when it came, brought the 
bitterest blow of all. 

Buzz, going downtown to Northwestern's 
medical campus for a conference with the 
dean, thought this a good time to surprise 
Toni and take her to lunch. Ambling over 
to her school, he asked the principal to 
locate her, and busy Sister Mary Adolina 
sent him directly to her classroom. 

Telling Lucy what happened, Toni almost 
drowned in tears. "Honestly, I wanted to 
go right through the floor. I couldn't be in 
English or anything like that. It had to be 
Algebra! Now he knows I'm just a fresh- 
man." 

Toni should have had more faith in her 
Buzz. Psychology classes already had 
trained him to recognize the frantic efforts 
people make to hide their deepest wounds. 
He realized her disappointment. 

At lunch, he gave no sign he knew how 



she felt, but to himself he determined 
Toni's hurt must be healed. Buzz chose a 
sure-fire cure. He telephoned the next 
evening to ask whether she would care 
to have dinner with him and go to a movie 
the coming Saturday. 

Long as she had waited to hear just 
those words, Toni couldn't quite believe 
them when they came. Excitement threw 
her disciplined voice completely out of 
control. "What did you say?" she shrieked. 

He retreated to bluffness. "I simply asked 
if you'd like to eat and go to a movie. Is 
that so unusual?" 

It was for Toni. Every shred of the 
actress evaporated in frenzied conscious- 
ness she was thirteen years old and being 
invited to her first date. "I-I don't know. 
I'll have to ask my parents." 

"Well, tell them there's a good show at 
the Chicago," said Buzz and hung up as 
though that settled it. 

Far from settling anything, it threw the 
entire Gilman family into heated discus- 
sion. 

Toni's father delivered his opinion. "I 
won't have it," he stated. "I don't care 
how many shows you have played, how tall 
you are or anything else. The fact remains 
you're too young to go out with boys." 

Her mother tried to soften the decision. 
"You know, Toni, how hard we've tried 
to give you your chance to become a fine 
actress and still safeguard you with the 
care a young girl should have." ■ 

Fully aware how much her parents had 
sacrificed to carry out that program, Toni 
knew she should yield, but instead she 
stormed, "You sound as though he intended 
to kidnap me or something." 

Her parents remained firm. The calen- 
dar's irrefutable logic, plus knowledge of 
what tragic messes some other precocious 
children had made of their lives, weighed 
heavily on their side. 

But the wistful appeal of young love 
was on Toni's, and her grandmother was 
the first to succumb to it. In the beginning, 
she had taken no part in the discussion, 
but at the crisis she stepped in. 

Summoning her daughter and son-in- 
law to a family conference, she said, "Now 
let's all sit down and talk this over quietly. 
I'll grant your point. Yet you might win 
this argument now and still be sorry later. 
I don't think Toni will do it, but girls 
have been known to lie to their parents 
and sneak out." 

She let that sink in for a moment. "Then 
there's the boy to be considered. How do 
you know what will happen when Toni 
reaches fifteen? You've seen plenty of girls 
go out with roughnecks just to spite their 
parents." 

She marshalled her final argument. "I 
really don't see what harm could come of 
letting Toni go out with Buzz. She knows 
how to behave and he's a fine boy. You 
know his family. They, as well as we, will 
expect the kids home at a reasonable 
hour." 

Harry Gilman gave in. His fondness for 
his mother-in-law had much to do with it. 
"O.K. You're the matriarch around this 
house, and you win again." He came over 
and gave her a little hug. "To tell the truth, 
I haven't known many times when you've 
been wrong." 

It was Toni's turn to receive the spirited 
little lady's admonitions. She shook her 
finger. "Mind you, you live up to your 
side of the agreement. You must be in by 
twelve and . . ." The aging eyes twinkled. 
"And your young man, when he calls 
for you, must pass my inspection." 

Toni cried, "Oh, Grannie, I love you," 
and rushed to the phone to relay the pro- 
visions to Buzz. His laugh carried clear 
into the room. "Tell your grandmother," 
he directed, "that she and I have a date. 



I think I can manage to meet her ap- 
proval." 

Let it be recorded that his prediction was 
correct, for Buzz made his first real date 
with Toni an occasion. He arrived with face 
well washed and suit sharply pressed. He 
carried a corsage of roses. 

For Toni that evening, the Lunt Ave- 
nue bus was far more exciting than any 
Cinderella's coach and four. The clattering 
old L train surpassed a magic carpet. Their 
dinner of spaghetti and Cokes far out- 
classed mythical nectar and ambrosia. 

When Buzz, mindful of his promise, 
whisked her up the front steps just at the 
stroke of midnight, the dream did not end. 
Instead, a new phase of it began, for he 
followed a gentle good-night kiss with the 
statement, "You're a funny little tyke, 
Toni, but I kind of like you." 

Toni's worst struggle to shake off the 
swaddling clothes of childhood and emerge 
into womanhood was over, but it was Buzz 
who won the right to the last line. He 
could not let her long pretense to be some 
one she was not go unchallenged. A month 
later, to celebrate her birthday, he took 
her to an amusement park and after they 
had zoomed over the roller coaster, ex- 
plored the tunnel of love and spun around 
in the whirligigs, he presented her gift — 
a toy dog and a lollypop. 

The postcard picture a concession pho- 
tographer made on that day remains 
pasted in the first of a series of scrapbooks 
which preserve mementos of their ro- 
mance. Toni didn't even know they existed 
until one fine evening. By then, the turmoil* 
preceding their first date had been dimmed 
by the intervening years in which Toni 
really grew up, finished school, appeared 
in Broadway plays, and became Mrs. Im- 
mermann, years in which Buzz took his 
medical degree, completed his internship, 
fought a war, established his practice as 
a surgeon, and became Toni's husband. 

Toni was then in a play, "Ten Little 
Indians," which completed its Chicago 
run and went on the road. Buzz arranged 
his vacation so he could join her in Den- 
ver. Arriving at the theatre, he apologized 
because he had had no opportunity to buy 
her birthday present. 

The June day was hot, Toni was tired, 
and the lack of a birthday present rankled 
just a little. Back in their hotel room, she 
made some sharp-edged statement to the 
effect that men — and she wasn't mention- 
ing any names — certainly were able to 
keep their emotions well repressed even 
though a little sentiment wouldn't hurt 
once in a while. 



Then she noticed a huge package sitting 
on the dresser. "What's this?" she de- 
manded. 

Buzz grinned. "Open it." 

She peeled back the wrappings and 
there, one on top of the other, were the 
eight scrapbooks. Pasted down on their 
pages were Toni's first little love letter and 
virtually every other important memento 
of their courtship. Under each entry was a 
comment in Buzz's firm, round hand- 
writing. 

Toni, with the evidence of the scrap- 
books, has never again accused Buzz of be- 
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105 



We'll Never Walk Alone 



(Continued from page 54) 
announced (to us) his candidacy for the 
White House around his fiftieth birthday 
and has invited us to be his guests there 
during his term and/or terms of office. 
Naturally, we have accepted! 

These three Johns in our family make 
for considerable confusion among our 
friends, but their names are in the Daly 
tradition of first-naming all male babies 
John. My husband is John Charles, called 
Charlie at home. It has taken me a long 
time to switch to his first name, so that 
people will know whom I'm talking about. 
John Charles, Jr., is now the Charles of 
our family, and John Neal is called John, 
like his father. You can see that it con- 
tinues to be somewhat confusing, but that's 
the way it has always been with the Dalys 
and no rank outsider like a wife can do 
much about it. 



Girls in the family just get nicknamed. 
Buncy was named Helene Grant, but we 
hardly remember that now. Affectionate- 
ly known at first as Baby Bunting, short- 
ened to Bunting, then Bunny, Bun, Bouncy 
and — finally — Buncy, she will probably only 
achieve the dignity of being Helene at 
school. My nickname, Kit, evolved from 
the fact that my parents called their only 
child Kiddie, which turned into Kit. To 
make matters worse, my husband refers 
to me as "Maw"! And Buncy would never 
forgive me if I didn't explain that our jet- 
black Scottie, Corky, is named for his cute 
little corkscrew tail, and that his paternal 
ancestor is General Eisenhower's dog. 

We live on the grounds of the Westches- 
ter Country Club, in Rye, New York, where 
John can play his favorite game, golf, in 
the little time he has for play. Our house 
is comfortable English Norman, in stuc- 
co and stone. I fell in love with the house 
the moment I saw it, seven years ago. 
In it I play the role of short-order cook, 
housekeeper, mender and cleaner-upper for 
a brood of hungry, busy people. Meal 
schedules are my nemesis. My husband has 
to live according to a rigid routine of 
working hours that permits him only one 
dinner a week with the family, on Saturday 
night. We make it a gala occasion, eat in 
the dining room instead of the smaller 
breakfast room, and usually have Father's 
favorite roast beef. 

John is a student at Phillips Andover, 
home for holidays and during vacations. 
Charles goes to the Harrison Avenue 
School nearby. Buncy is a pupil at Coun- 
try Day School. These two younger chil- 
dren are up and out early, but my husband 
waits for a mid-morning train to New York 
so we breakfast a little later. He has to 
get into town to start preparing his news 
broadcast or discuss one of his panel 
shows on television, keep business lunch 
dates, and do the hundred and one other 
things that enter into his reporting and 
moderating jobs. By one- thirty every 
weekday afternoon he is in the ABC news- 
room to look at film from all over the 
world that must be integrated with the 
news commentary. This calls for split- 
second timing. He is off the air at the 
ABC television studios at seven-fifteen 
and we often have a late dinner together 
around nine. Sometimes he has appoint- 
ments which keep him in town — perhaps 
a board meeting of the Overseas Press 
Club, of which he is president, or an in- 
formal conference about one of the shows. 
Friday nights he is always in town until 
late, to moderate It's News to Me. Sunday 

H nights he has America's Town Meeting 
and What's My Line? In fact, he has to 
!eave the house early Sunday morning for 

106 



his afternoon Around the World news 
round-up on radio. 

It was I who, innocently enough, changed 
John's career and started this whole er- 
ratic schedule of living for him. He 
was nineteen when we met. John was 
learning his family's woolen business in 
Boston. His father, an American geologist, 
had died when John was ten. His English 
mother had brought him back from 
Johannesburg, South Africa, where he was 
born and put him in school in New Eng- 
land. By the time I knew John she, too, 
was dead, and he was working for an 
uncle. 

I was living in Washington and finishing 
my senior year at William and Mary Col- 
lege, in Virginia, when a sorority sister 
invited me to her home in Dedham, Massa- 
chusetts, for a visit. Her family knew 
John's folks and he was asked one Sun- 
day as a suitable date for me. To tease 
me, they fixed him up as an eccentric 
character, dressed as no man I had ever 
met would get himself up. He feigned a 
lisp, dangled a pince-nez from a narrow 
black ribbon, invited me to "the most de- 
lightful literary tea"— and failed completely 
as an actor. I saw through the trick, of 
course, and really liked him at once. Like 
all husbands, he now says I hooked him. 
All I can say in rebuttal is that I stayed 
at Dedham a week and he asked me for 
a date every day and proposed to me before 
I went home. I said I wasn't even thinking 
of marriage yet, but secretly I was im- 
mensely flattered by all this attention. And, 
when he quit his job to move to Washing- 
ton because he was spending most of every 
weekend traveling back and forth by bus 
to see me, I knew he was really in earnest. 

All this happened around 1934, and I had 
stopped going with anyone else. I worked 
after I finished college, at the National 
Geographic Society and later for a pro- 
fessor at the Library of Congress, but 
I was never career-minded and am not 
now. Our dates together usually began 
or ended at my parents' house for dinner, 
because if John took me to the movies 
there never was enough money left for din- 
ing out. My mother said she hadn't seen 
so much of me since early childhood, but 
she loved watching John fill his thin, six- 
foot frame on her good cooking and they 
became great friends. When we got mar- 
ried, back in the depression year of 1937, 
my parents gave me a lovely church wed- 
ding with all the trimmings, and we went 
housekeeping in a one-room apartment on 
John's $27.50-a-week salary. When John 
Neal came, we moved to two rooms, and 
later to a little house. 

So many of the people John knew in 
Washington mentioned his fine voice and 
perfect diction, the result of his mother's 
careful training, that he finally decided 
he would try to get into radio, after this 
had been suggested to him many times. 
He did get an announcer's job at NBC on a 
summer-relief basis, and then he heard 
about one at CBS. They were looking for 
a permanent "special events" man, which is 
what they called newsmen who worked in 
radio then. When Bob Trout left to go 
to CBS's New York studios, John tried 
out for his job and got it, later being as- 
signed to the White House as Presiden- 
tial announcer and traveling with Frank- 
lin D. Roosevelt, touring with Wendell 
Wilkie, covering the 1940 conventions (he 
has covered all the major political con- 
ventions since). In 1941 we moved from 
Washington to New York, to an apartment, 
and when John went off to cover World 
War II from London, Algiers, all over the 
Middle East — and from Sicily and Italy 



and other places I couldn't bear to think 
about, because they figured so promi- 
nently in the casualty lists — I took the two 
boys and went back home to Washington. 

I had one wonderful advantage over some 
of my friends whose husbands were away. 
John was broadcasting and, when I heard 
his voice, I knew he was all right. It didn't 
help too much, however, when his voice 
was stilled for days and days and I didn't 
know where he was or why someone else 
was taking his place, but I had a hunch 
he was up at the fighting fronts. It was 
like heaven when he came on again and I 
knew he was all right. 

After John came home, before Buncy was 
born, we decided to get out into the coun- 
try, far enough to give the children some 
freedom but near enough to make com- 
muting easy for Father. We looked and 
looked, and the morning I walked into the 
house we live in now I knew our search 
was over. 

We both like the traditional English Nor- 
man architecture, and gradually we have 
been re-doing the house to suit everyone's 
ideas. Much of the furnishings are stuff we 
accumulated over the years. The boys will 
point something out to a visitor and ex- 
plain: "Daddy bought that when he was 
broke and he couldn't afford the other 
piece that was part of the set." That, of 
course, was the literal truth and the reason 
so many of our possessions have such 
wonderful associations for us. They repre- 
sent great care in the choosing and the 
sacrifice of other things which seemed less 
important to us than a home. The set 
of four bullfighter pictures, grouped over 
the living-room couch, is done in pen and 
ink and great splashes of watercolor. John 
got them in South Africa, wanted the other 
two that make up the set, but couldn't 
have them. 

Shelves that line one whole wall of the 
living room are filled with John's books, 
mainly historical, many of them covering 
the Civil War period that fascinates him 
so much. A photograph of the late Presi- 
dent, inscribed to "John Charles Daly from 
his friend Franklin D. Roosevelt," faces the 
photograph of General Eisenhower in- 
scribed to "John Charles Daly with best 
wishes and warm regard, Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower, North Africa, 1943." Our boys are 
particularly proud of the enlarged snap- 
shot which John himself took of President 
Roosevelt and which now stands on his 
desk upstairs. And Charles never fails to 
tell visitors that the pen used by General 
Eisenhower to sign the German surrender 
was one Papa John Daly bought at the 
PX — and, incidentally, wishes he still 
owned, since it has become so famous! 



The children like to watch their father 
on television, but I think they are some- 
times a little disappointed that he didn't 
continue to be an actor. He was, for thir- 
teen weeks, when he played the role of 
managing editor Walter Burns in the TV 
version of "The Front Page." He was do- 
ing radio news then and "Front Page" gave 
him a chance to get into television — which 
he very much wanted, along with radio — 
but, as a newsman, he felt that acting got 
him away from his real job. When screen 
tests were offered and one Hollywood 
studio came forward with a definite offer, 
it wasn't hard for him to say no. His heart 
really beats to the rhythm of a news ticker, 
so it looks as though the young Dalys will 
have to be satisfied with the daily drama 
which their father finds in the news head- 
lines or which is brought out on a lively 
television panel show. That's his line! 



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AUGUST, 1952 RADIO-TV MIRROR 

Contents 



VOL. 38, NO. 3 



Keystone Edition 



Ann Daggett Higginbotham, Editor Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Editorial Staff: Teresa Buxton. Betty Freedman, Helen Bolstad (Chicago) 

Hollywood: Frances Morrin 

Art Staff: Frances Maly, Joan Clarke 

Hollywood: Hymie Fink, Betty Jo Rice 



Fred R. Sammis, Editor-in-Chief 



people on the air 



What's New from Coast to Coast by Jill Warren 6 

A Present for Michael (full-length novelette from The Guiding Light) 

by Bertha Bauer 8 

What's Spinning? by Chris Wilson 14 

Igor Gorin 19 

Slim, Cool and Lovely by Victor H. Lindlahr 22 

Congratulations, Ladies Fair! (contest winners) by Tom Moore 23 

One Big Happy Family (Don McNeill's Breakfast Club) by Jeri Williams 

My Life Is Simply Perfect by Toni Darnay 

The Kind of Man You Marry. (Jane Nigh) by Betty Mills 

Traveling the Road of Life Together (Don MacLaughlin) 

by John M. Ross 

My True Story 

Johnnie Ray's Life Story by Gladys Hall 

Sentimental Twosome (Alice Frost) by Marie Haller 

Our Wedding Miracle (Bride and Groom) by Leon Cooper 

This Is Nora Drake — A Story of Fateful Decision 

Heartbreak Child (Love of Life) by Vanessa Dale 

Who's Who in Radio-TV (Leslie Nielsen — Jane Morgan — Virginia 

Gregg — Valentino) 64 

If You Must Leave Home by Audrey Totter 66 

Make the Most of Vacation Time (Mike Wallace and Buff Cobb) 

by Frances Kish 68 

features in full color 

Every Day's a Brighter Day (Margaret Draper and Joe DeSantis) 

by Diane Scott 44 

Paul Dixon — Home Town Boy by Helen Bolstad 46 

Should a Wife Try to Change Her Husband? (Lorenzo Jones) 50 

Godfrey's Boy — Julius La Rosa by Christopher Kane 52 

your local station 

Surprise Party for Felix (WWDC) 10 

They Mix Music and Marriage (WOR) 12 

Big City Farmer (KYW) 16 

Glenn's Castle (WJZ) 21 

inside radio and TV 

Information Booth 4 

Daytime Diary 24 

Inside Radio 73 

TV Program Highlights 75 

Cover portrait of Toni Darnay by Maxwell Coplan 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY by Macfadden Publications, Inc., New 

York, N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE, ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES at 

205 East 42nd Street, New York, N. Y. Editorial branch 
Offices: 321 South Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif., and 
221 North La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. Harold A. Wise, 
President; David N. Lrux, Fred R. Sammis and Sol Himmel- 
man, Vice Presidents; Meyer Dworkin, Secretary and Treas- 
urer. Advertising Offices also in Chicago and San Francisco. 
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.50 one year, U. S. and Posses- 
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CHANGE OF ADDRESS: 6 weeks* notice essential. When pos- 
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Member of The TRUE 



MANUSCRIPTS, DRAWINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS should be 
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FOREIGN editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
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Re-entered as Second Class Matter, Oct. 5, 1951, at the 
Post Office at New York. N. Y.. under the Act of March 3. 
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All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Conven- 
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registered in U. S. Patent Office. Printed in U. S. A. by Art 
Color Printing Co. 
STORY Women's Group 




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Information 



Ask your questions — 
we'll try to find the answers 



Joy's Joy 

Dear Editor: 

What ever became of Joy Geffen, whom 
I used to love to hear as Siri on Against 
the Storm? 

T. M., Altoona, Pa. 

Joy Geffen has taken a leave of ab- 
sence from radio work for a very good 
reason — she's expecting a baby this fall. 

Theme Songs 

Dear Editor: 

What song does Marlene Dietrich sing 

at the beginning and end of Cafe Istanbul? 

R. F., Red Oak, Iowa 

Marlene's sultry voice intones "La Vie 
en Rose." 

Dear Editor: 

What is the theme music used on One 
Mans Family? Vve listened to the pro- 
gram for years, but never did know the 
name of the song. 

B. J., Reading, Pa. 

One Man's Family opens and closes to 
the strains of "Waltz Patricia." 

Is Leg Married? 

Dear Editor: 

Is the man who plays the role of The 
Falcon married? 

M. H., Mobile, Ala. 




The man is Les Damon. The woman in 
his life is singer, Ginger Jones, Mrs. Les 
Damon. 

Weist to East 

Dear Editor: 

I am interested in the man who plays 
the part of Stan Burton on The Second 
Mrs. Burton program. Who is he, and what 
is his background? 

E. L., Spokane, Wash. 

"Go West, young man, go West," said 
Horace Greeley, but Dwight Weist, the 
male lead on The Second Mrs. Burton 
went East to find success. Dwight, who an- 
nounces Grand Slam and Big Town in 
addition to his radio acting, was born in 
Palo Alto, California. He moved East to 
attend Ohio Wesleyan University, where 
he majored in English. Editor of his col- 
lege newspaper, Dwight aspired to be a 
journalist. During college, he traveled 
eighteen miles a day to an announcing 
stint with a station in Delaware, Ohio. 
When he graduated, he appeared in road 
companies, until he was offered his first 
Broadway part, all the way East this time. 
The play was slow getting into rehearsal, 
so Dwight auditioned as an impersonator 
with the March of Time. He got the job, 
and remained with the program for its 
thirteen-year run. The Weists have two 
children. On weekends, he enjoys riding or 




Joy Geffen 



Dwight Weist 



Booth 



flying his own plane — as Dwight says, 
"I'm either on the air or in it." 

June is Meta 

Dear Editor: 

Who plays the part of Meta White on 
Guiding Light? 

C. B., Miami, Fla. 

Jone Allison, veteran radio actress, por- 
trays Meta White Roberts. 

Frank's a Ifane 

Dear Editor: 

Could you please give me some informa- 
tion about Frank Dane, who plays the part 
of Nap Drewer on Hawkins Falls? 

L. M., Nashville, Tenn. 

Frank Dane came to America from Den- 
mark with his parents when he was twelve 
years old. A few years later, Frank Hansen 
changed his name to Dane," and auditioned 
for a road company — deciding on acting 
as a "career. Frank thought he sounded 
terrible during that first reading, but the 
producer thought otherwise, and hired the 
young man on the spot. In 1927, Frank 
gave radio a try. and since then has ap- 
peared on hundreds of radio's dramatic 
shows. Married in 1934, Frank is the 
father of Bruce Dane, who plays Roy in 
Hawkins Falls. {Continued on page 18) 




Jone Allison 



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Donna Atwood gets warm glances from Eddie Cantor and Jack Benny at Ice Capades. 



what's new from 




On a Sunday Afternoon is the name of CBS' 
new summer radio show, heard on Sunday 
afternoons, of course, and beamed espe- 
cially at that part of the audience who might 
be at the beach, the park, or just out driving. 
It's a two-and-a-half-hour program of light, 
popular music with name bands, vocalists and 
top record hits. In between the tunes, there 
are safety messages, news on current events, 
and baseball lineups from all over the country. 
And individual stations cut in on the show, 
broadcasting local news and specific weather 
and traffic conditions in each area. 

Junior television fans, and some of the 
grownups, too, will be happy to know that 
Hopalong Cassidy ' has signed a new ten-year 
contract with NBC. William Boyd's deal with 
the network calls for fifty-two new half-hour 
movies, which he already has started to shoot. 
The first of the new series will be seen this fall. 

John Daly, popular commentator and foreign 
correspondent, who has also made quite a name 



Bob Crosby has Gisele MacKenzie eating out of his hand 
between songs on Club 1 5— by the way, it's cherry pie. 




Heimie, the chimp, makes a chump out 
of R. Marlin Perkins of Zoo Parade. 



Three bright Hopes — Bob, Delores, and their lovely daughter, Linda. 



Coast to Coast 




for himself as a moderator on television panel 
shows, has another job on radio. He will be 
heard on John Daly And The News, over the 
full ABC network, Monday through Friday 
evenings. 

Martha Stewart quietly replaced Vivian 
Blaine as co-star with Pinky Lee on Those 
Two, the musical TV show. The reason for the 
change, supposedly, was too heavy a schedule 
for Vivian, what with her nightly appearance 
as the star of "Guys and Dolls," the Broadway 
hit. But, according to insiders, it was actually 
just too much temperament, with Vivian's re- 
hearsal fights and off-stage rows with Pinky 
Lee reaching atomic proportions. 

Remember First Nighter, which was such a 
popular program a few years ago? In case 
you've missed it, it's back on NBC on Sunday 
nights. And the oi'iginal stars, Barbara Luddy 
and Olan Soule, also have returned to star on 
the new series of dramas at "the little theatre 
off Times Square." (Continued on page 11) 



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Back from a European honeymoon, singer Jo Stafford and her 

new groom Paul Weston say the honeymoon will never end. ' 

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a 
present 

for Michael 



Have you ever given someone who was impor- 
tant to you a promise to "forgive and forget"? 
The words are so meaningless, aren't they? 
Even if you've thought long and bitterly about 
them, dampened them with tears through many 
sleepless nights, urged them along with logical 
arguments . . . forgive and forget. Could a wife 
ever really forgive her husband for having allowed 
himself to become interested in another woman? 

I know now that I had a lot to do with every- 
thing that happened between my husband and that 
woman named Gloria. But Bill married me for 
what I am, just as I married him for what he can 
become. . . . He knew I believed you can make life 
pretty much what you want it to be by working 
over it a little. I guess I can understand that Bill 
felt driven, pushed, because I believed he could do 
better for both of us than he seemed to want to try 
for, in those early months. I can even understand 
that it drove him to Gloria. She was singing at that 
time in a bar here in Los Angeles, and it was handy 
when he felt like a drink, which was often. She 
didn't frown on that. She told him he was great, 
even when he was at his worst; or else she told 
him it was only human to be weak. . . . Oh, I don't 
know just what she told him. 

And then it was over. Just about the time I 
thought I had taken all the humiliation, the fright, 
the frustration I was going to take ... it was over. 
Part of it, I think, was Bill coming to his senses. 
But the biggest part was that I found I was going 
to have a baby. That was when Bill came home for 
good, and the forgiving and forgetting got under 
way. 

Except that . . . well, they never did, really. Yes, 
I accepted Bill's repentance, his determination that 
our little family unit was from that day forth invio- 
late. But I'm not superhuman. Show me the wife 
who could put it out of her mind forever, amen, 
that her husband had once preferred another 
woman's company. I tried but it was impossible to 
keep my old resentment — which was merely sleep- 
ing, not dead — from rising every now and then to 
spit and scratch a little. I suppose each time I was 
sarcastic or mocking I hurt Bill, but . . . how could 




I ever really forget how deeply I had been hurt? 
Still, as the time approached when my baby was 
expected, life seemed so much more peaceful and 
promising that everything was better. Bill and I 
seemed closer and more as one; there were so many 
plans to talk over, so many wonderful things to 
look forward to. Going (Continued on page 93) 



The Guiding Light, M-F, 1:45 P.M. EDT, CBS, for Duz and 
Ivory Flakes (Procter & Gamble). Actress Charita Bauer is 
pictured here in her role as Bertha, Anne Burr as Gloria. 



With my baby in my arms, I could ignore The Woman Gloria — Bill's Gloria — smirking on TV. 





Just a trio of night owls — Felix Grant and his pals, Muscles and her child. 



surprise party for Felix 



GRANT OF WWDC 



NEVER KNOWS 



WHAT TO EXPECT 




Bing Crosby celebrated his twentieth anniversary in 
show business by treating Felix and Helen to a trip. 



For Felix Grant, life — and radio — is merely one long 
series of surprises. In fact, he's now seriously con- 
sidering changing the name of Yawn Patrol, his all- 
night disc jockey show on WWDC, to Surprise Party. 

The first big surprise to come Grant's way was radio 
itself. He credits this one to World War II, when he 
left his New York home to enlist in the Coast Guard. 
After participating in three invasions — Tarawa, Mar- 
shall Islands, Saipan — he was beached for a time to 
recuperate. The Industrial Incentives Division of the 
U. S. Navy asked him to go on a speaking tour of war 
plants, in an effort to combat absenteeism in industry. 
In 1945, he was in Washington, D. C, addressing a 
group of Navy yard workers, when Norman Reed, 
program director for WWDC, heard Felix and asked 
him to drop around after he was discharged from ser- 
vice. Two days later, civilian Grant showed up — - 
discharge papers in hand— and Reed put him to work. 

In 1951, Felix got his second surprise when he won a 
disc jockey popularity contest sponsored by Bing 
Crosby. The prize, a trip to Hollywood for Felix and 
his wife Helen — courtesy of Bing. 

Even the cat "Muscles" — Felix's all-night companion 
on Yawn Patrol — had a surprise in store for her pal 
Felix. She dropped in one night, hopped up to the 
turntable and calmly gave birth to several kittens. 
Muscles didn't seem at all perturbed by any of this, so 
Felix adopted the same attitude and accepted the 
kittens as new additions to his midnight-to-six stint. 

Actually, Felix takes all these surprises in stride, 
because he's one of those relaxed, easygoing people. 
"The only problem I have," he comments, "is getting 
used to my peculiar schedule. My wife and I find it 
tough to accustom ourselves to eating breakfast at 
5 P.M., lunch at 3 A.M., and dinner at noon. It's like 
walking backwards through a cafeteria." 



10 



What's New 
from Coast to Coast 



{Continued from page 7) 
There are two new summer radio shows 
on ABC and, if the series shape up as 
well as the audition records, they should 
both make for good listening. The first is 
Black Night, which is a dramatic narra- 
tive. The central figure is a Broadway 
columnist, who makes nightly rounds 
along the Great White Way and reports 
his stories of romance and adventure. The 
second is titled Time Capsule, with Arthur 
Van Home as the commentator. The pro- 
gram will consist of tape recordings of 
unusual current events, which are being 
preserved in capsule form for future gen- 
erations to hear. The recordings will cover 
a variety of happenings. 



This 



That: 



Janet Waldo, who is Corliss Archer, and 
her husband, radio-writer Robert E. Lee, 
are beaming because of the arrival of 
their first baby, Jonathan Barlow Lee, 
who weighed in at 7 lbs., 12 ounces. Janet, 
who was temporarily replaced by Lugene 
Sanders as Corliss, will be back on the 
airwaves soon. 

If Lillian Schaaf, who is Hazel on One 
Man's Family, ever gets tired of her 
present career, she can make a new one 
for herself with no trouble at all. A few 
years ago, Lillian started a little side 
business of supplying coffee and sand- 
wiches to radio people during rehearsals. 
The small business became so successful 
that now Lillian has gone on to bigger 
things. She recently opened a gourmet 
specialty shop in New York, which she 
has named "Pot Luck," and it's doing fine. 

Robert Carroll, who constantly defends 
law and order in his role of Inspector 
Mark Saber on the Mystery Theatre pro- 
gram, made his movie debut in the new 
picture, "Walk East On Beacon," playing 
the part of a Communist. 

Ros Twohey says she feels like the 
mother of twins, instead of just the one 
little boy she and her husband recently 
welcomed. Ros, Mrs. John Twohey in real 
life, plays Millie Flagle — Mrs. Laif Flagle— 
on the television show, Hawkins Falls, 
Pop. 6,200. When Ros told the producer 
of the show last January that she ex- 
pected a child, he decided to write the 
happy event into the Hawkins Falls story- 
line. So Ros had her real baby and her 
"script" baby at the same time. The young 
lads both weighed five and a half pounds 
and they both were named Mark. 

Gale Gordon, whom you hear as Mayor 
LaTrivia on Fibber McGee and Molly, 
and Professor Conklin on Our Miss Brooks, 
has finally derived some personal satis- 
faction from his oil painting. Gale has 
been dabbling for years and just "sold" 
his first picture to Perry Botkin, Bing 
Crosby's guitar accompanist, who "paid" 
for the painting with a guitar and twelve 
lessons. Incidentally, Gordon also will play 
his Professor Conklin role on Our Miss 
Brooks when the show goes television this 
fall. He should have a fairly easy time of 
rehearsing with the girl chosen to play 
Mrs. Conklin. She's his real-life wife, 
Virginia. 

Karl Swenson says July is his big month 
because he has three anniversaries to 
celebrate — his own birthday, his new 
bride's birthday (she's Joan Tompkins) 
and the twentieth anniversary of his pro- 
fessional theatrical debut. 

Bing Crosby and his "almost" soft-drink 
sponsor for fall are still going 'round and 
(Continued on page 13) 



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11 




WOR's Ted 



and Ruby Mercer are a Mr.-and-Mrs. team who share work, play, love. 



they mix Music and Marriage 



In a cheerful Park Avenue apartment — 
crowded with books, stacks of record al- 
bums, a concert grand piano, and orchestra 
scores by the score — Ted and Ruby Haig 
(she's Ruby Mercer) live and work together, 
combining their musical and radio careers 
with one of the happiest marriages in Man- 
hattan. Ted and Ruby share the mike on 
WOR's Music We Like, and on Sunday be- 
come Mr. and Mrs. Opera over WNYC. 

Ruby is a well-known opera and concert 
soprano, and Ted is a virtuoso pianist who 
started his career at the age of seven. Be- 
cause of these two careers, which they pur- 
sue in addition to their radio work, Ted and 
Ruby have had to learn to synchronize their 
schedules. "I've often heard," Ruby com- 
ments, "that music and marriage don't mix, 
but with us it's been the tie that binds our 
home life together." When concert tours 
come up, either Ruby or Ted takes over their 
shows alone. 

It was the World's Fair that brought the 



pair together. Ted was chief master of cere- 
monies at the Court of Peace, and Ruby was 
singing in the Fair's "Gay New Orleans Re- 
vue." One day, Ted got the assignment of 
introducing Ruby in a special Fourth of July 
show. They dated that night, and continued 
to see each other every day thereafter, until 
they decided to make it a permanent arrange- 
ment a year later. 

The Haigs' favorite hobby is fancy car- 
pentry. When they take a non-musical 
moment, Ted whips out hammers, saws and 
wood to tackle some elaborate cabinet which 
Ruby has designed. Cooking is another pet 
pastime, especially for Ted, who is an expert 
at preparing succulent French dishes. Their 
dream is to buy an old house, within com- 
muting distance of New York, where they 
can work and play — and build things. 

Although they share a whirlwind schedule, 
both agree that their activities are more fun 
than work. And, as Ruby sums it up, "It's 
being together that makes life worth while." 



12 



What's New 
from Coast to Coast 



(Continued from page 11) 
'round over the little matter of television. 
In addition to his taped radio show, the 
sponsor wants The Groaner to do a num- 
ber of video programs as well. But Bing 
only wants to do four, and he wants to 
do them his way — on film, in his own 
Hollywood studios, where his Bing Cros- 
by Enterprises are now shooting movies 
for television. Master Crosby can be very 
firm about things and, in this matter, un- 
less he and the would-be sponsor can 
come to terms, there won't be any deal. 

What Ever Happened To . . . 

Olive Stacy, the girl who first played 
the role of Connie Thayer on the tele- 
vision serial, The First Hundred Years? 
(The part is now played by Anne Sar- 
gent.) The strain of doing a daily camera 
show, with the long hours of rehearsal, 
was too heavy for Olive, so she resigned 
her role. She has done nothing profes- 
sionally since, and at the moment is back 
in her home town, Rochester, New York. 
This summer, Olive plans to tour the East- 
ern part of - the United States with her 
sister, Frances Klute, who will be shoot- 
ing scenic spots for the Eastman Kodak 
Company. Frances is one of their top 
color photographers. Incidentally, the 
story that Olive had married, and was 
expecting a baby, is untrue. This was 
erroneously printed in many newspaper 
columns about the country. 

Bob Harmon and Evelyn McGregor, who 
were the singers on the American Melody 
Hour program several seasons ago? Both 
Bob and Evelyn have more or less given 
up radio in favor of concert work, though 
Bob does make club appearances from 
time to time. Evelyn has spent most of 
her time on the West Coast, inasmuch as 
she lives near San Francisco now. 

Edith Spencer, who was the original 
Aunt Jenny on the daytime show of the 
same name? Miss Spencer played the role 
for many years until she was forced to 
give it up due to a serious illness. Un- 
fortunately, she has not been able to do 
any radio work since. Agnes Young took 
over the Aunt Jenny role about a year 
and a half ago. 

Alan Dale, the singer who appeared on 
the Sing It Again program and other 
shows? Alan is still very much around, 
though he is not signed on any regular 
radio or television show at the moment. 
In addition to guest shots, he still plays 
night clubs and makes records. 

George Keane, who used to be Bill on 
the Rosemary daytime serial? George has 
done no professional work for a long time, 
due to illness. He and his wife, Betty 
Winkler, who was also heard on Rose- 
mary and other shows, have been living 
quietly in Europe for several months. 

These are personalities readers have in- 
quired about. If you have wondered what 
happened to one of your favorites on radio 
or television, drop me a line — Jill Warren, 
Radio-TV Mirror Magazine, 205 E. 42nd 
Street, New York City 17, and I'll do my 
best to find out for you and put the in- 
formation in the column. Sorry, no per- 
sonal answers. 



(Note: On all shows, both radio and 
television, be sure to check your local 
papers for time, station and channel.) 



J 



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14 




As Johnnie Ray's record success con- 
tinues to zoom, his personal success 
-is even more impressive. Johnnie's 
wedding to cute, pretty, little Marilyn 
Morrison, daughter of Hollywood night- 
club owner, Charlie Morrison, was handled 
beautifully. The two youngsters asked for 
and got the cooperation of the press so that 
the ceremony was as it should be — beau- 
tiful, dignified and private. Afterwards, 
however, the couple worked with camera- 
men and newsmen to give these represen- 
tatives the type of material which their 
public wanted to see and hear from them. 
Older (and supposedly wiser) Hollywood 
personalities could certainly take a leaf 
out of Johnnie's book on how to be hon- 
estly cooperative! One small humorous side 
was Father Morrison's comment when he 
was asked what will happen when Johnnie 
is billed next fall into Ciro's night club, 
right across from the one he runs, the 
Mocambo, in Hollywood — "I'll simply bill 
my daughter as Mrs. Johnnie Ray," he 
laughed. We got a chuckle, too, out of 
Bob Crosby when he was chiding Johnnie's 
popularity over the Club 15 radio show. 
"When you have a voice," Bob said, "you 
get a recording contract. But when you 
cry you get a million dollars." 

Fan Stuff: 

Doris Day's radio show continues to be 
one of the most popular singing programs 
on the air. Her "Guy Is a Guy" Columbia 
recording is holding up surprisingly well. 

Strictly for laughs is Louis Prima's "The 
Bigger the Figure," out on the Columbia 
label. It's a comic satire based on an aria 
from "The Barber of Seville" and is 
backed by "Boney Bones," with the lyrics 
written by Prima himself. 

Columbia is reissuing "Rockin' Chair," 
with the late Mildred Bailey's famous blues 
rendition of the lyrics which was first 
recorded 'way back in June, 1937. This 
will be the first time the record will have 
been available in eight years. Orchestra- 
tion is by Red Norvo, to whom Mildred 
was then married. On the back is Mil- 
dred's "Give Me Time," which has been 
revived on so many discs recently. 

The Lancers quartet, whom you're hear- 
ing on Capitol's "The Horn with Two 
Mouthpieces" and "I May Hate Myself in 
the Morning," are UCLA boys who began 
singing in church choirs to gain experi- 
ence. After a stint at the Hollywood Mo- 
cambo and other Southern California night 
spots, Kay Starr asked them to join her 
act at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas. 
She then had them back her on her "I 
Wanna Love You." As a result they've 
been signed to an exclusive five-year con- 
tract by Capitol. You'll see them around, 
too, guesting on all sorts of TV and na- 
tional radio shows. 



What's 



Martha Carson, who's out with "I Wanna 
Rest" and "Old Blind Barnabuss," has been 
signed for a permanent spot on Grand Ole 
Opry (NBC). Frankie Laine, Jo Stafford 
and Spike Jones are all booked for Euro- 
pean tours this summer. Danny Kaye will 
be entertaining the troops. Vic Damone, 
now in Germany, expects to be discharged 
from the Army by fall. Andrews sisters 
Patti, La Verne and Maxine returned from 
Honolulu last of April. Trio's "Why Worry" 
should push their record sales up to the 
25,000,000 mark. 

Gordon MacRae's "Gentle Hands" was 
written by a thirty-five-year-old blind 
Western and hillbilly singer, Leon Payne. 
Payne met his wife at a school for the 
blind, and now they have four children. 
This is the second of his songs to be sung 
by a popular recording artist — the first 
was by Jan Garber and was called "Love." 

Capitol out with the Jane Froman album 
of all the beautiful songs from the picture 
based on her life story, "With a Song In 
My Heart." Album has the same name. 

Ray Anthony's recording of "You're 
Driving Me Crazy," for Capitol, which 
sounds like nothing a trumpet ever 
sounded like before, was made possible 
when a curtain was drawn between the 
orchestra and the microphones, with just 
Ray's trumpet sticking out of it. An echo 
mike did the rest. "Trumpet Boogie," fea- 
turing five trumpets with his on , top, isn't 
quite so — well, startling. 

On the classical side, George Copeland 
has just recorded "Modern French and 
Spanish Piano Music" to take its place in 
musical libraries alongside his "George 
Copeland Plays Debussy and Spanish 
Piano Music." Copeland, although an 
American, has lived most of his life in 
France or Majorca and, therefore, has a 
tremendous background in the field of 
Spanish and French musical masterpieces. 

Albums You Shouldn't Miss: 

MGM's pop package of Art Mooney's 
"The Blacksmith Blues," Fran Warren's 
"I Hear a Rhapsody," "Tulips and Heather," 
with Bill Hayes, and "That's the Chance 
You Take," with Ted Straeter. Back side 
of long-playing platter has Alan Dean's 
"Be Anything (But Be Mine)", in case 
you missed it as a single record. 

"Singin' In the Rain," recorded off the 
sound track from the Gene Kelly — Debbie 
Reynolds— Donald O'Connor film, by MGM. 

Joseph Battista's "Favorite Piano En- 
cores," being released under the MGM 
label. He stopped off in New York long 
enough to record the album before he 
started a grand tour of South America. 
"The Months," composed by Tchaikovsky, 
recorded by Morton Gould for Columbia. 
A suite of twelve short piano pieces which 
are delightful. 



Spinning? 



? 



Three twelve-inch long-playing records 
by Columbia known simply as "The Bix 
Beiderbecke Story." These recordings were 
made as singles between 1927 and 1929 
just before Bix died at twenty-seven. 

Single Records You Should Get: 

If you own 10, you're groovy; 8, you're 
learning; 6, where are you putting that 
allowance, in your stomach? 

1. Decca's "You Go To My Head" and 
"Lover," sung by Peggy Lee. 

2. "Kiss of Fire," with Les Brown, on 
the Coral label. Are you lovesick? 
This will kill or cure. 

3. MSM's- "After Graduation Day," 
with song stylist Cindy Lord. And 
what style! 

4. "Here Is My Heart," backed by 
"Tomorrow Never Comes." Re- 
corded by Vic Damone in Germany 
for Mercury. 

5. "Am I In Love" and "Wing Ding" 
(Capitol), with Jane Russell and 
Bob Hope having fun. You should 
and will listen. 

6. Larry Douglas, with Ray Bloch's or- 
chestra, for Coral, with "Never Let 
Her Go" and "Black, Black, Black 
Is The Color Of My True Love's 
Hair." Folk songs sung well. 

7. Dinah Shore's Victor recording of 
"Delicado." "The World Has A 
Promise" is on back. 

8. "Just A Little Lovin'," with Victor's 
Eddie Fisher. 

9. "All Of Me," with Johnnie Ray, for 
Columbia. Or anything else by him. 

10. "Somewhere Along the Way," Co- 
lumbia's Tony Bennett, the newest 
object of CG (current generation) 
heart-throbs. 




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15 




Billy's comments on cows will be used on the Farm Hour. 



Dishes are fun for Billy, Bill, and Connie Givens. 

KYWS Bill Givens is a 

BIG CITY 



F 



armer 




Long after most Philadelphians have bedded 
down for the night, and the last weary strag- 
gler from the late poker game stumbles upstairs 
with shoes in hand — over at Bala Cynwyd, coffee 
starts perking and an electric razor begins to 
hum. That's where Bill Givens and family stake 
out, and 3:45 A.M. is rise-and-shine time for the 
KYW radio star. 

Bill has to get up on time to be behind the 
mike at five-thirty, when his Farm Hour pro- 
gram hits the air. Popular with both farm folk 
and city people, Givens talks to farmers, spins 
pop platters, exchanges gags with his buddy, 
Gene Graves, and gives time and weather an- 
nouncements. He learned the ropes of farm 
broadcasting back in 1947, when he joined the 
staff of WGY, Schenectady. 

Literally raised in radio, Bill has been on the 
air for sixteen years, though he is only twenty- 
nine years old. He started with recorded com- 
mercials for a New York State Ford distributor 
at the age of thirteen, and was a full-time an- 
nouncer in Elmira, New York, two years later. 



It was station WENY in Elmira which figured in 
many of the important events in Bill's life. His 
dad was the promotion manager of the station, 
and it was a program on WENY which got him 
an audition with a Syracuse station in 1941. To 
top off the chain of circumstances revolving 
around Elmira's station, Bill met Connie Mow- 
chan there, when he was home on leave from 
the Marines. She was the boss's new secretary, 
and is now Mrs. Givens. 

Billy (Jr.) Givens seems to be following in his 
daddy's footsteps. The four-year-old has al- 
ready made his radio debut on his father's pro- 
gram, often commenting on county fairs and the 
like, giving his kid's eye view, and until a few 
months ago appeared on a local TV moppet show 
once a week. He's been retired for a while, 
though, because his parents felt it was too much 
for him. Connie and her two Bills are a happy 
threesome, who share work and play together. 
Their big dream is to be able to have a farm of 
their own some day. Until they can manage it, 
Bill will remain a Big City Farmer. 



16 



QyW 

of these women 

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secret. . . 




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18 



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41 




P 



Information Booth 

(Continued) 
Search for Tomorrow 

Dear Editor: 

Would you please send me all the in- 
formation you have on the girl who plays 
Joanne Barron on Search for Tomorrow 
over TV? 

D.IV., New Castle, Pa. 

Mary Stuart, who plays the role of 
Joanne Barron, was born in Miami, Flor- 
ida, on July 4. 1926. The family later 
moved to Tulsa. Oklahoma, where Mary 
attended Central High School and Tulsa 
University. Ever since her childhood days. 
Mary has been active in dramatics. She 
organized a children's theatre group dur- 
ing high school and college, presented 
charity plays, and did Saturday morning 
radio programs over KOME. Tulsa. When 
she was seventeen, she sang and acted in 
a USO troupe, touring camps in the Mid- 
west and Southwest. At nineteen, Mary 
headed for New York to get some theatri- 
cal training, but landed a job as a cam- 
era girl in the Roosevelt Hotel Grill in- 
stead. Joe Pasternak of MGM discovered 
her there, and brought her to Hollywood 
under contract. After several years in 
filmland, Mary returned to New York and 
TV. In August, 1951. she was married to 
Richard Krolik, TV producer-director. 

Autry Town 

Dear Editor: 

What was the original name of the town 
named after Gene Autry, and what state 
is it in? 

W.S., Butte, Mont. 

Gene Autry. Oklahoma, was formerly 
the town of Berwyn. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— If there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
Radio-TV Mirror, 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y. We'll answer, if we can, 
provided your question is of general in- 
terest. Answers will appear in this column 
— but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter, and specify ivhether your question 
concerns radio or TV. 




Mary Stuart 




Igor Gorin 



When Igor Gorin was attending the 
Vienna Conservatory, his friends 
dubbed him the Viennese Cowboy. 
But, Gorin, whose cowboy songs were 
a "must" at every student party, did 
not hail from the great plains of Texas. 
Far from it — he is a native of the 
Ukraine in Russia. 

Igor's interest in the American cow- 
boy stemmed from the imported films 
he saw and the cowboy songs he heard 
frequently during his boyhood. From 
the time he heard his first cowboy 
melody, Igor was an avid collector of 
Western Americana. His greatest 
dream was to come to the United States 
someday, and actually visit a ranch, 
and ride the prairie. 

While he was still a student in 
Vienna, he heard the ranting of Adolf 
Hitler for the first time, and suddenly 
he knew that it was time for him to 
journey to the New World. 

Gorin arrived in New York with 
little more than his beautiful voice to 
see him through. He had little money 
and could speak but a few words of 
English, but his voice was enough. In 
a few months, he was booked into the 
Roxy Theatre as a featured singer in 
the stage show. A ten-week NBC 
program followed, and Igor began to 
realize that this really was the land 
of opportunity. 

Success followed success for Gorin. 
From NBC, he went to California, 
where he was featured for three years 
on the Hollywood Hotel show. He also 
obtained a contract with MGM, for 
whom he made his first movie, "Broad- 
way Melody of 1938." Gorin was one 
of the first concert stars to set the 
precedent of including cowboy songs 
in his program, and these songs are 
still his favorites. 

Whenever radio and concert engage- 
ments give him a breather, Igor and 
his Ohio-born wife, Mary, head west 
for the Emerald Valley Ranch in Colo- 
rado, where Igor ropes and ties as well 
as any professional cowpuncher. 

He has come a long way since he 
became an American citizen, but the 
biggest part of his success story, for 
Igor, is that he has been able to live 
in the nation which so captured his 
imagination as a child, and be truly 
a "Yankee" — Western style. 




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THERE ARE THREE BRECK SHAMPOOS 
FOR THREE DIFFERENT HAIR CONDITIONS 

There are three Breck Shampoos. One Breck Shampoo is for dry 
hair. Another Breck Shampoo is for oily hair. A third Breck 
Shampoo is for normal hair. A Breck Shampoo cleans thorough- 
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Shampoo will help bring out the natural beauty of your hair. 

The three Breck Shampoos are available at Beauty Shops and wherever cosmetics are sold. 



JOHN li 

NEW 



BRECK 
K K 



MANUFACTURING 
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CHEMISTS 
K R A N C 1 



SFRINGFIELU 
CO ■ O T T 



I MASSACHUSETTS 
AW A CANADA 



The Riggs house has been standing for over one hundred years. 




W 



JZ's Glenn Riggs has a theory 
about life. He believes every man should 
have one special place to hang his hat 
and his heart, after the harrying workaday 
chores are done. And for Glenn — who 
emcees his own show, Kitchen Capers, 
in addition to being one of the busiest 
announcers in radio — that place is 
one of the loveliest and most love-filled 
homes in this or any town. 

In Roslyn Harbor, Long Island, on 
Bryant Avenue — named for the late poet, 
whose old house is next door to the 
Riggs home — Glenn has found the ideal 
spot for his own special place. Here, with 
his wife and their two children, a pet 
English bull, and plenty of water to fish 
in, Glenn is at peace with the woi'ld. 

Every man's house is his castle — and 
Glenn's really looks like one. But Glenn, 
himself, would be the first to tell you 
it's the people living in it who make it home. 



Glenn's 



Castle 





The Riggs family like to spend summer evenings out on 

I the back veranda. Smiling out over the rail are Mother 

Laird, Glenn, his wife Elizabeth, Glenn, Jr., and Elizabeth, 

Jr. At left, a corner of the Riggs's cheerful living room. 



21 



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Slim, cool and lovely 



These tempting dishes 
help you keep both weight 
and temperature DOWN 

By VICTOR H. LINDLAHR 




It's during these sweltering midsum- 
mer days that we are most likely to 
upset our entire diet. With heat, hu- 
midity and humanity for an excuse, 
we neglect well-balanced meals for 
high-calorie temptations such as sweet 
drinks, sherbet and ice cream, bottled 
soda ice-cold from the refrigerator, 
late evening drives into the country 
for hamburgers with French-fries and 
a frosted on the side. 

Human beings do mighty foolish 
things. Dieters shun a whipped cream 
sundae in the winter, but the fact that 
it's cold makes it seem all right in the 
summer. A high-calorie food is still 
as fattening but, worse, the extra 
calories increase our body tempera- 
ture, and summer is the time we least 
need extra heat. 

Everyone, fat or slender, requires 
certain basic foods daily and it's fool- 
ish to forego them for any length of 
time, heat or no heat. But the person 
reducing has limited herself to par- 
ticular low-calorie foods, essential and 
convenient to prepare. These can be 
made into decorative, cooling dishes, 
as appealing as a sundae. 

Cottage cheese, for example, offers 
many possibilities. Plump it into the 
center of half a honeydew melon, gar- 
nish with seedless green grapes, 
peaked with a bright cherry, and you 
have a dish which might be served 
proudly at a bridge luncheon. Deli- 
cious fresh fruits are so plentiful now 
that you can vary this dish a dozen 
different ways. And don't forget cot- 
tage cheese is a perfect base for sum- 
mer vegetables — chopped scallions, 
radishes, carrots, celery, and such. 

Switching to eggs, a basic, beneficial 
food for everyone, here is a quick, 
low-calorie salad which should do for 
six. Combine three cups of shredded 
cabbage, one-half cup of chopped cel- 
ery, a diced carrot, and green pepper 
and tomato. Add one tablespoon of 
grated onion, one teaspoon of salt, a 



dash of pepper, teaspoon of sugar, one 
tablespoon of lemon juice and table- 
spoons of reducing salad dressing. 
Place this in center of platter and sur- 
round with six sliced, chilled, hard- 
cooked eggs. 

The reducing salad dressing is made 
of one-half cup of skim milk (lightly 
salted), one teaspoon of onion juice, 
one tablespoon each of lemon juice or 
vinegar, minced parsley, and minced 
pimiento, plus a sprinkle of paprika. 
Shake well and serve fresh. 

There are dozens of other low-cal- 
orie salads, enough for the entire 
summer: Aspic, apricot and grape- 
fruit, molded pineapple ring, orange- 
pineapple-strawberry, ham, lobster, 
shrimp, just to mention a few. 

Jellied consomme, a summer favor- 
ite, is especially low in calories. And 
remember that ordinary consomme, 
with little effort, can be made into jel- 
lied tomato or chicken consomme. 
Fruit cups, cantaloupe balls, and or- 
ange ambrosia are low-calorie sweets 
which may serve as appetizers or 
desserts. 

Beverages are of extra importance 
to us during hot months, which pre- 
sents a real problem for the dieter ad- 
dicted to various bottled sodas. An 
average bottle is just about the equiv- 
alent of a small piece of candy, which 
you would probably turn down. The 
sugar content makes you just as hot 
as the candy would — and just as fat. 
Most punches are unusually high in 
calories. Recommended drinks are 
lemonade or limeade (sweetened with 
saccharin) and low-calorie fruit 
juices. 

This, of course, is the time of the 
year when overweight people are 
most uncomfortable. The heat is much 
harder on them and exercise is diffi- 
cult, if not impossible. There should 
be plenty of incentive for calorie- 
counting. You'll feel and look a lot 
better for it. 



Congratulations, 
LADIES FAIR! 




By Tom Moore 

Announcing the Winners 

of the 
Big $1,000 April Contest 

/choosing winners in the Ladies 
^ Fair — Radio-TV Mirror games 
contest made me wish I could 
have attended the parties where 
all your games originated. As I 
studied the entries, I saw hours 
of fun rather than just the speci- 
fied "fifty words or less." I saw 
crowds of happy people rather 
than mere sheets of paper. 

Every letter, I am convinced, 
came from a person endowed with 
the gift of leading others to put 
aside personal problems, forget 
individual differences, and have a 
good time together. 

With thousands of entries, my 
staff and I had a tough time 
deciding which ones were best 
and, in the end, it was usually 
the contestant's comment which 
turned the balance. As we antici- 
pated, we found a few new games 
and many, many variations of the 
old familiar ones which have been 
passed from generation to gen- 
eration ever since the first Amer- 
ican colonists lightened the toil 
of a harvest by holding a husk- 
ing bee. 

I was particularly impressed by 
the way our good old belief in 
equality showed through. Many 
contest games were plotted to put 
every- (Continued on page 28) 



Tom Moore emcees Ladies Fair, M-F, 11 
A.M. EDT, over the Mutual network. 




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24 




Da ytime 
diar y 




AC.4f.VST TRE STORM As Siri, the 

daughter of Professor Allen, becomes 
absorbed once again into the activities 
which concern Harper's faculty, new in- 
fluences combine to help her put her hus- 
band's sudden death behind her. How 
will Mr. Monroe, of the English depart- 
ment, affect her life . . . and how will 
Siri in her turn affect the life of young 
Hugo Wilson, whose girl Adelaide cannot 
understand how her fiance feels about 
education? M-F, 10:45 A.M., EDT, ABC. 

AUNT JENNY One of Aunt Jenny's 
recent stories took liberties with an old 
adage when it told of a case in which a 
mother did not know best. When Carol 
Baxter, only sixteen, fell in love with 
nineteen-year-old Lancey Smith, Carol's 
mother was doubtful, recalling a romance 
of her own early youth in which she had 
suffered a good deal. But was Lancey 
the same kind of boy as Mrs. Baxter's 
unworthy beau ... or was Carol right 
about him? M-F, 12:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

BACKSTAGE WIFE Broadway star 
Larry Noble, separated from his wife 
Mary by the machinations of wealthy 
Rupert Barlow, was about to see 
Mary to try to clear himself of Barlow's 
charges when he was kidnapped. At last, 
however, he believes he has proof that 
Rupert was behind the kidnapping. With 
this evidence, can Larry persuade Mary 
to listen to his defense and call off 
her divorce plans? M-F, 4 P.M. EDT, 
NBC. 

BIG StSTEB The past months have been 
hard for Dr. John Wayne, so hard that 
his wife Ruth has reason to wonder, once 
or twice, if he has not actually welcomed 
his serious bout of pneumonia as a way 
of resting for a time from other pressures. 
Who can help Ruth to guide John back 
to a healthy emotional state as he con- 
tinues despondent, though physically im- 
proved? Will Dr. Roger Marlowe do harm 
rather than the good he intends? M-F, 
1 P.M. EDT, CBS. 




THE BRIGHTER BAY In spite of the 
paralysis, caused by an accident, that con- 
fines Althea Dennis to a wheelchair, she 
cannot make those around her treat her 
as an overwhelmingly tragic figure. Her 
father's calmness, the housekeeper Fran- 
ny's shrewdness, and particularly the 
matter-of-fact attitude of young Dr. Holden 
infuriate Althea. as they try to make her 
see life is not over for her. Will Larry 
Race be the victim of her frustration? 
M-F, 2:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

THE BOCTOR'S WIFE Young Julie 
Palmer unexpectedly finds herself an 
important person in her community by 
virtue of her husband's profession. Dan 
is a doctor, and because people have a 
way of making doctors their confidants, 
Julie learns a good deal about the troubles 
of those around her. In her own way she 
is often able to give as much help and 
comfort as Dan himself . . . but some- 
times even Julie makes a mistake. M-F, 
5:45 P.M. EDT. NBC. 

FBO.YT PAGE FARRELL Reporter 
David Farrell and his wife Sally stumble 
over an unusually complicated set of- cir- 
cumstances when they become involved 
in "The Interrupted Wedding Murder 
Case," which begins when the murder of 
the bride's father makes a shocking in- 
terruption to a June wedding. What of the 
missing wedding gift, alleged to contain 
a vast sum of money? And what of the 
murderer, lost in what amounts to a sea 
of suspects? M.F, 5:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

GVIBIXG LIGHT As Meta and Joe 
Roberts approach the very brink of di- 
vorce as the result of the unflagging re- 
fusal of Joe's daughter Cathy to accept 
Meta as a stepmother, Cathy's own prob- 
lems begin to pyramid. Is Joe right in 
insisting that Cathy's mistakes would have 
been made even if Meta had never come 
into her life? Is there any hope for Meta's 
marriage if she continues to blame her- 
self for Cathy's unhappiness? M-F, 1:45 
P.M. EDT, CBS. 



I HILLTOP HOUSE The episode of 
young Marcia's cheating during an ex- 
amination has had violent repercussions 
as she plans, and very nearly executes, a 
dramatic revenge against the teacher who 
caught her. Will Reed Nixon at last admit 
thai"" liis adopted daughter is something 
more serious than merely a spoiled child? 
And how will Julie Paterno manage the 
increasing emotional tension generated 
bv Dr. Jeff's younger brother? M-F, 3 P.M. 
EDT. CBS. 

Jl'Sr PLAIN BILL Bill Davidson 
watches with anxiety the curious circum- 
stances that appear to be binding to- 
gether two dissimilar families in Hart- 
ville. What connection can there be be- 
tween wealthy Sidney Chadwick and his 
son and the poor farm woman. Hannah 
Brooks, and her daughter? Is there some 
secret lost in the past to explain the re- 
lationship? Can Bill be of any help in 
preventing a tragedy? M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, 
NBC. 

LIFE CAN BE BEAUTIFUL Papa 
David has taught his adopted daughter 
Chichi many ways to create happiness 
for herself against the pressure of out- 
side circumstances, but even Papa David 
knew that Chichi's greatest happiness 
would not come until she fell in love. Now 
at last he sees the girl he loves radiantly 
happy in her engagement to Martin Walk- 
er. Will the Vandenbush family affairs 
straighten out as a wedding present for 
Chichi? M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

LONE JOURNEY Lansing McKenzie's 
lonely excursion, which he intended to 
mark the end of his life with Sidney, is 
halted by a curious complication when 
he looks up an old Army friend. Jack 
O'Neill, and discovers what a strange, 
almost eerie person Jack has become. 
Jack's stunning blonde wife, Eva. attempt- 
ing to explain her husband's apparent 
clairvoyance, further convinces Lansing 
that something most strange is taking 
place in his friend's life. M-F, 11 A.M. 
EDT, ABC. 

LORENZO JONES How can Lorenzo 
keep his mind on his work at Jim Bar- 
ker's garage when right there in town, in 
the Carmichael home, is a secret passage- 
way that he is certain leads to buried 
treasure? Ever since Lorenzo removed a 
picture for Mrs. Carmichael and discov- 
ered the passage, he has been busy in- 
venting schemes and treasure finders 
which — he keeps telling Belle — cannot fail 
to unearth the treasure. Or can they? M-F, 
5:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

MA PERKINS Mathilda Pendleton sets 
into motion events she can no longer con- 
trol, when her suit for divorce against 
Augustus starts making changes in sev- 
eral lives. For instance, Amy McKenzie, 
who insisted that she and Augustus were 
good friends but would never be husband 
and wife . . . well, Amy might be chang- 
ing her mind about that. And Ma, set 
against divorce though she is. is wondering 
'too. about one thing and another. M-F, 
1:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 




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Daytime Diary 



26 




Accepted for Advertising 
by the Journal of the American Medical Association 



MARY MARLIN Joe Marlin has been 
called upon to play the most dangerous 
game in which an American can become 
involved — that of pretending to be one 
of his country's enemies while in reality 
he is one of its most loyal citizens. Will 
he maintain the delicate balance of his 
position between the FBI and the sub- 
versive groups who claim him? Will 
Mary's help and loyalty give him the 
strength he needs to come through? M-F, 
3:15 P.M. EDT, ABC. 

OUR GAL SUNDAY Sunday and her 
husband, Lord Henry, are delighted when 
young Robert Hunter arrives to claim the 
inheritance left by his father, Myron, who 
was murdered by his greedy wife, Chris- 
tine. But they are dismayed when Robert 
reveals his intention of giving away what 
he calls 'tainted money.' Will he succeed 
in getting Audrey West to take it, thus 
proving his cynical theory that no woman 
can resist taking money? M-F, 12:45 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

PEPPER YOUNG'S FAMILY Badly 
injured during the capture of Gil, Pepper 
lies for many weeks in Elmwood Hospital, 
while his family tries to keep hoping he 
will pull through. It is unfortunate in 
many ways that Pepper's wife Linda is a 
nurse at Elmwood Hospital, for during a 
delirious period Pepper revealed some 
hidden thoughts that have shocked his 
wife so deeply that there may be an im- 
portant change in their whole relation- 
ship. M-F, 3:30 P.M. NBC. 

PERRY MASON Loneliness is a sad, 
dreary state, and people suffering from it 
have been known to do foolish things. 
Perry Mason becomes involved with an 
organization that manipulates the loneli- 
ness of its victims for its own gain. What 
will happen as he follows the queer, 
tangled chain of events which begins to 
unwind as fate puts one small lead into 
Perry's curious hands? M-F, 2:15 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

ItH.IIJ TO UAPPiNESS Proud as she 

is of her husband, Miles, Carolyn Nel- 
son sometimes wonders if things wouldn't 
have worked out better if he had never 
become governor of the state. His health 
in serious jeopardy from a bullet wound, 
his character under fire, Miles now faces 
one of the most trying ordeals of his life. 
And in spite of her great courage and in- 
genuity, Carolyn fears the forces against 
them may be too powerful. M-F, 3:45 
P.M., EDT, NBC. 

ROAD OF LIFE As Conrad Overton's 
trail of wrong-doing, which extends far 
back over the years, comes dangerously 
close to exposure, the one relationship 
he prizes seems also to be tottering — that 
with his daughter Sybil. Will Dr. Jim 



Brent and his friend, Frank Dana, bring 
Overton to a stop before some dreadful 
tragedy occurs? Will Jim be able to 
save Jocelyn, the girl he loves? M-F, 3:15 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 

ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT Who 

is behind the well-organized campaign of 
slander and persecution directed against 
Hollywood gown designer Helen Trent? 
Is it the wealthy Ogden Baileys, trying to 
protect their son Barclay from Helen, 
whom they believe to be a conscienceless 
fortune hunter? Is it Cynthia, who knows 
her estranged husband. Gil Whitney, loves 
Helen? Or is it the neurotic Lydia Bailey, 
wife of Helen's boss? How can Helen 
protect herself? M-F, 12:30 P.M. EDT, 
CBS. 

ROSEMARY As Bill Roberts' trial for 
the murder of Blanche Weatherby en- 
counters legal complications, Rosemary's 
endurance is stretched to the breaking 
point. No help seems possible, for though 
Agnes Wilson, mother of the dead woman, 
holds a secret that could free Bill, she is 
neurotically adamant in her desire to make 
him suffer for a crime he did not commit. 
Will Eddie Miles be Bill's key to freedom? 
M-F, 11:45 A.M. EDT, CBS. 

SECOND MRS. DURTON As Stan's se- 
rious illness prolongs itself, Terry bows 
to financial necessity and moves back to 
Mother Burton's house. She knows her life 
will be made unbearable by her mother- 
in-law's constant efforts to undermine her 
marriage, but for the sake of Stan and 
her children she steels herself to bear it. 
However, a shocking development in 
Stan's illness suddenly puts Terry in a 
most suspicious light. M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, - 
CBS. 

STELLA DALLAS Wealthy, eccentric 
Jared Sloane, Stella's neighbor, seems 
not to realize that his young secretary, 
Emily Calvert, is in love with him. Stella, 
trying to help this girl, who is a former 
schoolmate of her daughter Laurel's, won- 
ders how to keep Jared from being de- 
ceived by the man who is supposed to be 
his friend, Eric Tyler. What is the con- 
nection between Tyler and Muriel Drake, 
who obviously wants Jared's money? M-F, 
4:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

STRANGE ROMANCE OF EYELYN 
WINTFIRS Rivalry between . two wom- 
en controls the fate of the new show 
written by playwright Gary Bennett. Will 
the feminine lead be played by expe- 
rienced Cecily Lockwood, who has starred 
in Gary's previous successes? Or will it 
be Gary's young ward, Evelyn Winters, 
whose recent Broadway debut was strik- 
ingly brilliant? When Gary makes his 
choice, will he also be choosing between 
the two women who love him? M-F, 3:45 
P. M. EDT, ABC. 



THIS MS NORA intiKF. Whatever 
happens to Nurse Nora Drake, she will 
not soon forget the nightmare scene 
when she and Dr. Ken Martinson were 
forced at gunpoint to perform an emer- 
gency operation on the dying Fred Spen- 
cer . . . nor Ken's breakdown at the 
crucial point. When, or if, Nora learns the 
secret Spencer holds — the secret of Peg 
Martinson's death — will it make her own 
predicament worse or better as she tries 
to prove her innocence? M-F, 2:30 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

WENDY H'ARRE.\ Was it Hollywood, 
the actress Maggie Fallon, or something 
in Mark himself that caused his promising 
picture-writing contract to fall apart into 
such a distressing shambles? Wendy, who 
knows now that she should not have al- 
lowed her work to divide her from Mark, 
cannot help wondering if, at bottom, he 
really didn't love her enough to want to 
hurry their marriage. What can happen 
to them now? M-F, 12 Noon EDT, CBS. 

WHEN A GiRL MARRIES Endeavor- 
ing to disentangle his life from his dam- 
aging association with Claire O'Brien, 
Harry Davis sends his wife Joan to Paris 
with their children to have her out of the 
way of scandal he cannot hope to avoid. 
The effect on Joan is far deeper than 
Harry suspects. What will happen to her 
in Paris, as she tries to save her sister's 
marriage — and worries about her own? 
When Harry tells her the truth, will it 
be too late? M-F, 11:15 A.M. EDT, ABC. 

THE WOMAN IN MY HOUSE Young 
Virginia Carter made a bid for inde- 
pendence and the pursuit of happiness 
when she decided to move from the family 
home and room with Caroline Wilson. But 
she may have been manufacturing some- 
thing besides happiness for herself, for 
the progress of her romance with Stan 
is far from smooth. Stan's individual view 
of life — and his previous entanglements — 
make those who love Virginia wonder if 
he is the right man. M-F. 4:45 P.M. EDT, 
NBC. 

YOUNG OR. MAEONE If Sam Wil- 
liams begins to crack up under the 
pressure exerted by Gillette, can his son 
Gene help by fighting Gillette, or will 
Gene's antagonism only make things worse 
at the plant for everyone? Meanwhile, in 
New York, Jerry Malone tries to keep out 
of the family problems of Mary Browne 
Horton, though there are times when he 
would like to give Mary's husband, Ernest, 
an undiluted piece of his mind. M-F, 1:30 
P.M. EDT, CBS. 

YOUNG WIDDER BROWN The diffi- 
culties encountered by Dr. Anthony Lor- 
ing in trying to prove his long-ago first 
marriage was annulled have so discour- 
aged him that he appears to have lost 
hope of ever marrying Ellen Brown. Is this 
the reason why Ellen, hurt and confused, 
accepts the romantic attentions of Dud- 
ley Collins? Or is there another reason for 
Ellen's interest in Collins, who is sup- 
posed to be investigating the old marriage 
and annulment? M-F, 4:30 P.M. EDT, 
I NBC. 




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ZONE 




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Lana Turner 
Betty Grable 
Ava Gardner 
Clark Gable 
Alan Ladd 
Tyrone Power 
Gregory Peck 
Rita Hayworth 
Esther Williams 
Elizabeth Taylor 
Cornel Wilde 
Frank Sinatra 
Van Johnson 
Rory Calhoun 
Peter Lawford 
Howard Duff 
Bob Milchum 
Burt Lancaster 
Bing Crosby 
Shirley Temple 
June Haver 
June Allyson 
Ronald Reagan 
Dana Andrewi 
Glenn Ford 
Bob Ryan 
Kathryn Grayson 
Gene Kelly 
Diana Lynn 
Doris Day 
Montgomery Cliff 
Richard Widmork 
Mona Freeman 
Wanda Hendrix 
Perry Como 
Bill Holden 
John Garfield 
Bill Williams 
Barbara Hale 
Barbara Lawrence 
Lon McCallister 
Jane Powell 
Gordon MacRae 
Ann Blyth 
Jeanne Crain 
Jane Russell 
John Agar 
John Lund 
Bob Stack 
John Wayne 
Yvonne de Carlo 
Richard Conte 
Audie Murphy 
Dan Dailey 
Larry Parks 
Macdonald Carey 
Janet Leigh 
Wendell Corey 
Farley Granger 
Louis Jourdan 
Tony Martin 
Cary Grant 
John Derek 
Guy Madison 
Ricardo Montalban 
Mario Lama 
Joan Evans 
Kirk Douglas 
Gail Russell 
Keefe Brasselle 
Dick Contino 
Scott Brady 
Bill Lawrence 
Vic Damone 
Shelley Winters 
Richard Todd 
Vera-Ellen 
Dean Martin 
Jerry Lewis 
Howard Keel 
Susan Hayward 
Barbara Stanwyck 
Hedy Lamarr 
Betty Hutton 
Coleen Gray 
Terry Moore 
Ruth Roman 
Patricia Neal 
Arlene Dahl 
Tony Curtis 
Piper Laurie 
Debbie Reynolds 
Penny Edwards 
Carleton Carpenter 
Jerome Courtland 
Polly Bergen 
Marshall Thompson 
Gene Nelson 
Jeff Chandler 
Rock Hudson 
Stewart Granger 
John Barrymcre, Jr. 
Debra Paget 
Dale Robertson 
Marilyn Monros 
. Leslie Caron 
Pier Angeli 
Mitii Gaynor 
Marlon Brando 



COWBOY SPECIALS 

25. Dale Evans 

33. Gene Autry 

34. Roy Rogers 

35. Sunset Carson 

36. Monte Hale 

37. Hopalong Ccssidy 

38. Bill Elliott 

39. Johnny Moch Browr 

40. Al "Lash" LaRue 

41. Jimmy Wakelv 



27 







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Congratulations, 
LADIES FAIR! 



(Continued from page 23) 
one on the same footing, level 
the pretensions of the high and 
mighty, build up the nerve of the 
timid and, in accomplishing this, 
give everyone a good laugh. 

My thanks to all who sent in 
entries, and my congratulations 
to the winners of the following 
prizes: 

The gas range 

Mrs. Ray Schalk 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Three-piece bedroom set 

Mrs. Keith Mong 

American Falls, Idaho 

Lady's gold watch 

Mrs. Lawrence E. Ford 
Portland, Oregon 

Tank-type vacuum cleaner 

Mrs. Hathaway Gorsline 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

Year's supply of cosmetics' 

Mrs. Margaret Hopwood 
Buffalo, New York 

Five-piece aluminum ware 

Mrs. Frank P. Sweet 
Bakersfield, California 

Two-quart pressure pan 

Mrs. Geroy T. Anderson 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Automatic electric toaster 

Mrs. George Prusoff 
Miami, Florida 

Deep-fat fryer 

Mrs. Paul Schumacher 
Youngstown, Ohio 

Cigarette lighters 

Esther Starrette 

Mansfield, Pennsylvania 
Mrs. W. N. Sorensen 

Fresno, California 
Mrs. I. F. Nicholson 

Fort Worth, Texas 
Mrs. Earl Brewer 

Chehalis, Washington 
Donna Neckers 

Clymer, New York 

Three-pair sets of nylons 

Mrs. Roscoe R. Smith 
Hampshire, Illinois 

Myrtle Holden 

Laramie, Wyoming 

Joyce Conrad 

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Wm. Herbert Smith 

Talladega, Alabama 
Mrs. Carl Ross 

Calhoun, Kentucky 

Bottles of perfume 

Rose B. Debs 

Poughkeepsie, New York 
Mrs. Carroll Evans Smith 

Green Bay, Wisconsin 
Mrs. J. E. Fisher 

New Cumberland, West Virginia 
Terri Endresen 

Duluth, Minnesota 
Erin O'Hara 

Detroit, Michigan 



HAPPY family 



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Anything can — and 
does — happen when the 
Breakfast Club goes 



on tour. But nothing 



is ever too much for 



Don McNeill's gang 




\ 



Don interviews his wife, Kay — who "was mighty hcppy after 
they'd finished that ride to Springfield, Massachusetts! 



By JERI WILLIAMS 



As every listener knows, the Breakfast Club gang is 
like one big happy family. And taking a family 
' on a trip across the country — just ask any mother 
of a brood — is a hazardous undertaking. So many 
things happen just because the group is in strange 
surroundings, living among new people, things that 
just never seem to happen at home. Then, too. this 
is such a large family, and each individual has his or 
her own way of getting in and out of situations. Aside 
from Don McNeill himself, there's Sam Cowling, Fran 



See Next Page 



one big 
HAPPY family 




The McNeills learned to use chopsticks — and Sam 
Cowling tried — at Lee's Restaurant in Manhattan. 



(Aunt Fanny) Allison, Patsy Lee, Johnny Desmond, 
Eddie Ballantine, producer Cliff Petersen, engineer 
Jimmy Daugherty, secretary Mary Canny, the an- 
nouncers, and Don's wife, Kay McNeill. All these 
made up the small clan which took the Breakfast 
Club on its recent tour, beginning with a first show 
in Boston, then a broadcast from Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, the very next morning. 

It never fails, of course. Whenever a trip is planned, 
at least one member of the family has some sort of 
ailment which makes everyone doubt the sanity of 
taking him or her along. And the Breakfast Club was 
no exception. When they left Chicago, Kay McNeill 
had a small back ailment. So, before she left, she saw 
the doctor and 'the doctor said to take it easy — he'd 
tape her back so that she'd be as comfortable as pos- 
sible, but she was to avoid any strain on it. Don had 
misgivings about her going at all, but had about as 
much luck as most husbands in trying to persuade his 
wife. She wound up persuading him. 

After the show in Boston, Don had some business to 
attend to in Springfield, Massachusetts, so he and Kay 
decided to rent a car, drive to Springfield and meet 
the cast in Hartford later that day. The car they 
rented turned out to be a long, black limousine, 
chauffeur- driven — because neither of the McNeills 
knew Eastern roads. When Kay saw the length of the 
back seat, she decided she'd be more comfortable 
sitting up straight in the front seat with the driver. 

They settled themselves and started out. In a few 
minutes, Kay was looking back nervously over her 
shoulder at Don. Something was radically wrong. The 
car was jerking along — seemed to be running out of 



Happy highlight of the tour: Number-one Breakfast Club fans, the Jimmie Darous, 
rate big kisses from Johnny Desmond and Fran Allison, while Don "takes it big." 



gS 



Nw 



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30 




Biggest excitement: Producer Cliff Petersen, engineer Jimmy Dougherty and Sam 
Cowling watch firemen at work after the show's equipment burned up in Baltimore. 



gas one moment, then riding smoothly the next. The 
next instant, it was running out of gas again. But it 
didn't take Kay long to discover what the trouble was. 
The driver was a very short man and he was simply 
having difficulty reaching the gas pedal with his foot, 
although the seat had been moved forward as far as 
it would go. He told them he'd stop and get a cushion 
at the next town. 

However, they were now getting onto the highway 
and time was precious. So Kay got the bright notion 
that, being a fairly tall girl, she could reach the gas 
pedal easily with her left foot and handle the matter 
of feeding gas to the car for the rest of the trip. Which 
she did very efficiently, and the McNeills arrived in 
Springfield in even finer fashion than they had antici- 
pated. What's more, when they got out of the car, 
Kay gave a squeal of delight: "Don — my back! It feels 
great. The pain's completely gone." 

She thanked the driver profusely and told him that, 
if it hadn't been for him, she would probably have 
gone about crippled for the rest of the trip. Poor 
fellow, it's doubtful if he understood a word of what 
she was talking about. Whatever had been wrong with 
Kay's back must have gone back into place when she 
stretched out her left leg. A cure which Kay could 
hardly have effected by remaining at home! 

One thing about the Breakfast Club gang which 
makes Don particularly proud is the way they always 
stick together and help each other whenever there are 
any problems or troubles. (Continued on page 88) 




The boss-man laughs as much as anybody when Fran 
Allison goes into her act as gossipy Aunt Fanny. 



Don McNeill's Breakfast Club, M-F, 9 A.M. EDT, over ABC; 
sponsored by Swift & Co., Philco Corp. and General Foods. 



31 



1 4*kVi*rt**\i 



KESJ 



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These are the precious things I feel that Evelyn Winters is missing, the worthwhile treasures which fill my 
arms and make my world wonderful: My son Darnay, my husband Bill (Elwood Hoffman), my daughter Toni. 



32 




iy life 

is simply 
perfect 




Bill's q writer — which turned out to be a lucky break 
for me, because that's how and why we met. He 
also happens to be my idea of a perfect husband 
and father. What's more, the man can really cook! 





Being a busy actress is exciting, but being a 
mother — also very busy — is the' most fun of all. 



As Evelyn Winters, Toni Darnay 
seeks glamour and romance. 
But, in real life, Toni's already 
found it — and happiness, too ! 



m H uowui 



Although my name is really Toni Darnay, 
for almost eight years I've been answering 
to the name of Evelyn Winters every 
afternoon, and sometimes even in the grocery 
markets on Saturdays, my day off. Evelyn 
Winters is the main character in The Strange 
Romance of Evelyn Winters and I've 
come to know her intimately and well. She's 
a wealthy young orphan who longs for 
glamour and romance, all the time consumed 
with a secret love for her guardian, Gary. 
And there are times when my heart aches to 
have Evelyn learn the simple secrets of 
happiness — secrets which, as Toni Darnay, 
I could reveal to her. 

For one thing, I'd have Evelyn happily marry 
a wonderful man like Elwood (Bill) Hoffman, 
my husband, and then I'd give her two 
lively children who would keep her from 
ever being sorry for (Continued on page 71) 



The Strange Romance of Evelyn Winters — on ABC, M-F, 
3:45 P.M., for Philip Morris. Just Plain Bill— NBC, 
M-F, 5 P.M., for Whitehall Pharmacal Co. Both EDT. 



d 




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Today, Jane Nigh (of TV's Big Town) and her husband John (of the U.S. Navy) are 
glad indeed that — though their first date was "blind" — their hearts were not. 



* 



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THE KIND OF 



34 



MYTR 



"TVThy don't you marry me?" Bill's lips 
YY asked the question as his eyes told me once 

again, with all the tenderness which was part 
of him, that he loved me. Why? I asked myself the question which 
had kept me awake through dark nights, searching my soul, searching 
the past for an answer. . . . When I was eighteen (now I'm twenty-four) I had 
fallen in love with Ralph. It was a mad, wonderful, gay courtship. As gay as the 
crowds which filled the stadium to see Ralph race, as wonderful as the quiet when the race 
was over, as mad as the speed at which he drove around dangerous curves, past reckless 
opponents. His gifts were lavish orchids just to say he was thinking of me, passionate notes to 
confirm the love we'd whispered to each other but an hour before, theatre tickets so we could 
sit and hold hands. Then came the day when the wheels turned faster, as Ralph and his famous 
rival, Jack Jones, fought it out on the speedway and Ralph lost — lost not only the race, but his life, 
as well. In my blind grief, it seemed to me that all feeling, all life had truly left me there in the in- 
stant of that crash. Within a year, I learned to paint my face with a smile which hid my aching 
heart, to conceal the waves of emotion that swept over me at the mere mention of his name. It was 
during this period that I met Bill. Nearly five years had passed, with sweet, understanding Bill paying 
court, wooing me in his calm, staid way. He was head accountant in a shipping office, a position he'd 
worked steadily to obtain. ... I stirred restlessly, as I leaned back against him. Slowly I said: 
"Bill, for ages now I've been asking myself why I won't maiTy you. You are the kindest, 
most generous man I know. You'd make some girl a good husband. But I'm not sure about — 
well, about us." "Joan," he whispered softly against my ear, "let me say only one thing to 
you. Against the excitement of a roaring crowd, I offer you a home; against the stimulation of 
a race run against death, I offer you love and, ultimately, children with their joys and sor- 
rows. Can these compete with shadowy memory and bring you happiness?" In that 
moment, I knew. Perhaps, had Ralph lived, I might have been so blinded by 
daily thrills that the good things of life might have been forever denied me. A 
true excitement rushed through me as I turned to Bill and answered, simply, "Yes." 

My True Story is heard on ABC, M-F, 10 A.M. EDT, for Bayer Aspirin 
and Phillips' Milk of Magnesia. Popular radio-television players 
Vicki Vola and Chester Stratton are pictured here as 
Joan and Bill in this story. 



JOHNNIE RAY'S life story 



He stirs the hearts of others 
because his own heart has been so 
deeply stirred — searching from 
childhood for the answer 
each man must find for himself 



M CrUfZ H 





"Never a girl I was in love with," he says, "until 

Marilyn Morrison came along!" Now she's Mrs. Johnnie Ray. 



A LITTLE barefoot boy of five, slender and 
serious, climbed up on the dining-room table, 
an old oak table in a spacious, comfortable 
farmhouse located in the countryside near Dallas, 
Oregon. On the radio, Kate Smith was singing 
"Dancing with Tears in My Eyes" and the small 
boy, pirouetting around the table, sang it with her. 
Sang with tears in his eyes and in his voice. 

In the farmhouse dining room, the small boy's 
only audience was his mother and his nine-year-old 
sister, Elma. Listening to him, there were tears in 
their eyes, too. And, when the song was done, hugs 
and kisses were showered on the pint-sized per- 
former. 



The given name of the five-year-old with the light 
tan hair, the slanted gray eyes, the face of a faun, 
was John Alvin Ray. Today, twenty years later, in 
the plush precincts of New York's Copacabana, 
young Johnnie — still thin as a reed, still intense, still 
with tears in his eyes — has sung to an audience solid 
with such celebrities as Jane Froman, Tallulah 
Bankhead, the Duchess of Windsor, Esther Williams, 
Frankie Laine, Fran Warren, Frank Sinatra and 
his Ava, Danny Thomas, Billy Eckstine, Marlene 
Dietrich and Milton Berle. When he had done, the 
energy, the passion, the ecstasy, the tears he spends 
as he sings, touched them. Touched that thrill- 
accustomed audience. Frankie Laine broke down. 



See Next Page- 



41 






Tears in his eyes may be Johnnie's trademark — but not when the girl in his arms is Marilyn, his beloved bride. 



while Johnnie was singing "Cry," and cried like a 
baby. Talu went wild, then wilder (and asked 
Johnnie out after the show). Uncle Miltie mopped 
his steaming eyes and Jane Froman unashamedly 
reached for a handkerchief. In all who listen to him 
sing . . . the sophisticates at the Copa, the bobby- 
soxers at the Paramount, the teenagers at the juke- 
box, mixed audiences around any disc jockey pro- 
gram in the country . . . "Mr. Emotion" unleashes 
emotions, releases inhibitions. And tears. . . . 

Johnnie is truly America's most talked-about, 
least known -about entertainer of this generation. 
Johnnie has sung this way since infancy. Sung this 
way, even when, later, he was to have trouble keep- 
ing a job. Trouble for quite a time, for eight long 
years of singing and hoping that someone would 
understand and listen, really listen as everyone 
does today. 

Johnnie tells his life story in a very casual, easy 
manner. For, when he isn't working, Johnnie is as 
relaxed as a r - ag doll. He wears "easy" clothes. 
Slacks. T-shirts. Tweed jackets. And goes for grays. 



He sprawls on the edge of his spine smoking, drink- 
ing black coffee. Or he makes a bed of two chairs 
(when a couch isn't handy) and lies upon it as he 
talks. 

"I was born and raised on a little farm of about 
twenty-five acres, near Dallas, Oregon. And I stayed 
in Dallas the first sixteen years of my life. I went to 
high school there until my sophomore year. Then 
my folks moved to the big city, to Portland, where 
I was graduated from Franklin High. I didn't go 
to college; didn't think college had anything to 
offer — " an aside with his wry grin— "matter of fact, 
didn't think any school had much to offer at any 
time. I knew — I always knew deep down — what I 
wanted to do. 

"My dad, a millwright, worked in a lumber mill. 
My mom was and is a mother — is there anything 
more? I have one sister, Elma, four years older than 
I.- Elma's married now to Art Haas, a lumberjack. 
They have three kids and live in Roseburg, Oregon, 
right near Mom and Dad, who moved to Roseburg 
after the war. 



42 



JOHNNIE RAY'S life story 



"I was born January 10, 1927, in Mom's bedroom 
at home. When I was a kid Mom used to tell me: 
'You were born in this house, in this bed.' I used 
to sit on the floor in Mom's room and stare at the 
bed and think, This is where it happened." 

It was a big house that Johnnie was born in. 
"Barn-red in color," he describes it, "it wasn't an 
elegant house, but it was a strong, sturdy house. A 
friendly house, too. It liked children and animals. 
It had a big front porch where Mom and Dad and 
Elma and I used to sit after supper of summer 
evenings, talking and laughing and counting the 
stars. It had a big woodshed out back where my dad 
didn't whip me, couldn't have. He loved me too 
much. We love each other in our family. We're not 
ashamed to show it, either. That's why I'm not 
ashamed to show my emotions now. It's as natural, 
as sincere, for me to cry on a stage as it was when 
I sang on the dining-room table back home. I've 
always been singing this way. . . ." 

To the truth of this, Johnnie's sister, and best 
friend, bore witness as she said: 

"When we were kids, I used to tell him, 'Quit 
hollering, for Pete's sake and relax!' I might as well 



have told the wind to stop blowing, or a lark to stop 
singing its way, or any natural thing to stop doing 
what it was made to do, for truth is, Johnnie 
couldn't stop. He just couldn't. 

"According to Mom, John was playing and sing- 
ing 'Rock of Ages' when he was two and a half. 
Even allowing for the way moms are, she must be 
right, for I recall that he started to play things 
he'd hear on the radio — by ear, of course, for he's 
never had a lesson in his life — by the time he was 
able to reach the keys of the old organ we had 
in the parlor at home. He couldn't have been more 
than three then. 

"When he was in the second and third grades he 
used to sing for his class and I can remember that, 
when we worked during the summer vacations, I'd 
be plugging away to earn a nickel while John would 
be singing, with tears on his high notes same as 
now, coming away with nickels, dimes and quarters 
in his jeans." 

Elma's first distinct memory of her little brother 
is the day he was born. "I remember putting my 
foot on the ladder rung of Mom's old-fashioned 
bed and climbing up in (Continued on page 83) 



The members of the wedding: Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Ray; their boy, Johnnie; Marilyn; her father, Charles Morrison; 
her mother, Mrs. Elsie Krueger. Ceremony took place in New York, with the Mayor himself among, those present. 




Margaret Draper and 
Joe DeSantis 
knew it was dangerous 
to believe in 
miracles — but not 
the miracle of love 





Brighter Day 



By DIANE SCOTT 




""^Zov think it won't happen to you this way, but it does. 
[ It did, to me." Margaret Draper was speaking (or was she 
singing?) of love. Of falling in love. Of the way, the 
precipitate, at-first-sight way she fell in love with Joe, and 
Joe DeSantis fell in love with her. 

"I couldn't believe it really happened," Margaret was saying. 
"I wasn't thinking of falling in love or of getting married. 
Some day, of course, but not then. And the way it happened 
was so, you might say, routine. So all-in-the-day's-work. 
Joe had a radio program at the time called Under Arrest, in 
which he played the lead. I was called to audition for the 
part of a girl reporter. I met Joe when I read. I was impressed 
by -him because he was very helpful (Continued on page 89) 



Brighter Day is heard on CBS, M-F, 2:45 P.M. EDT, for Procter & Gamble. 
It can also be heard on NBC, M-F, 9:45 A.M. EDT, lor the same sponsor. 

Son Christopher's the heart of their home, but Joe and Margaret have many 
talents and hobbies. For instance, Joe made the statue below, the bookcases 
and the ingenious closet doors — which open to reveal the workshop at left. 



44 





The house for which Paul was willing to "mortgage 
his future" — now so secure for the four happy Dixons. 



He wanted his wife to be 
happy, even if it cost him his 
career . . . then found the pot 
of gold in his own back yard 



Here's one man who'd rather help 
around the house than go play golf! 




When Paul Dixon's television show first began 
catching on, Mort Watters, manager of his home 
station, WCPO in Cincinnati — and also Paul's 
good friend — called him aside and issued an edict. 

"If ever I catch you getting big-headed," he warned, 
"I'm going to take you out to the woodshed and 
wallop the tar out of you." 

Paul's laugh was hearty. "If such woodshedding ever 
becomes necessary, you'll have to wait your turn. 
Marge will beat you to it." 

It was a safe prediction for, although Marge is the 
non- interfering kind of wife, she also would be 
irked by delusions of grandeur. Slender and dark- 
haired, she has features bequeathed by an Irish colleen 
ancestor, but back of her pretty face there's a nimble 
mind, a quick wit and a down-to-earth quality 
which leads her to prefer a steak from their deep- 
freeze to vichyssoise at Sardi's, and a house with a big 
back yard to a Park Avenue penthouse. 

In fact, these characteristics of Marge's are part of 
the foundation of Dixon's and Watters' own successful 
teamwork. Their association began when Paul 
decided he was willing to sacrifice his own dream of 
fame in favor of the immediate reality of providing 
a good home for Marge. 

Watters calls Marge the kind of girl who would 



PAUL DIXON 




home town boy 



Paul's in his heaven with son 
Greg, daughter Pam — and Marge, for 
whom he made a dream come true. 



47 



PAUL DIXON— home town boy 



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Busy as his broadcasting schedule is, Paul has a 
hand in everything that's cooking around the Dixon 
house — even the inevitable dishwashing afterward. 



*t % v 5»" * •*" *"' 





Marge revels in being a mother, remembers when 
babies were a luxury the Dixons couldn't afford. 



have been just as happy if Paul had remained in 
Albia, Iowa, and run a gas station. Marge says 
that's partly — but not entirely — true. She could 
never be happy unless Paul had a chance to do 
what he wanted, and Paul has always known 
what he wanted from broadcasting. 

He has known ever since he was a small boy 
whose father, a pharmacist by profession, was a 
public speaker by avocation, much in demand at 
service clubs, lodges and high-school graduations. 

Well-scrubbed and attired in Sunday best, the 
Dixon children were sometimes permitted to 
accompany their parents to such doings. Sensitive 
even then to the reactions of those around him, 
Paul watched his father's audiences, learning to 
read in the set of a man's shoulders, in the nod of 
a woman's head, the assurance that his father was 
putting into words ideas they had groped to define. 
So the child's ambition was born. Only, where 
his father had an audience of hundreds, Paul 
wanted millions. The magic and static of the 
superheterodyne was crackling into their county- 
seat town, and Paul Dixon lived, breathed and 
dreamed radio. It was all he asked from life. 



48 




Paul may need his sleep, but Marge knows he loves his lively youngsters as much as they love him. 

The back yard's fine for the children — and it's a 
place where two contented parents can relax, too. 



Obstacles appeared equally fast. When he was 
sixteen, his father died. After his graduation from 
high school, his mother moved to Washington, but 
Paul chose Des Moines. He managed two semesters 
at Drake College there, then quit school to con- 
centrate on the radio stations. He got some work 
at KSO and KRNT, but proved more successful in 
love than he was in his attempts at a career. 

Walking down the street one day, he encoun- 
tered a girl who looked familiar, glanced back 
over his shoulder and discovered she was doing 
the same thing. 

After delighted exclamations of "Aren't you 
Paul Dixon from Albia?" and "Aren't you Marge 
Hannam from Melrose?" they recalled they had 
first met at a band concert in the Albia courthouse 
square. 

She was cashier in a hotel coffee shop, Paul 
learned. But, when on the following Wednesday 
he phoned to ask for a Saturday date, Marge said 
she was busy. Resourceful Paul asked, "How 
would you like to go (Continued on page 86) 

The Paul Dixon Show, Wed., 8 P.M. EDT, on ABC-TV. 
Also local programs, WCPO and WCPO-TV, Cincinnati. 




49 



c 



should a wife try to 
hange her husband? 

Lorenzo Jones is determined to settle down, 

as Belle wants him to, but life has a 

way of interfering with the best-laid plans 



Solemnly, Lorenzo Jones has assured his wife, Belle, that never again will 
he invent anything, never again play detective. Belle is overjoyed that 
Lorenzo is at last getting his feet on the ground . . . from now on, will be 
a different man. But is this possible? With the best intentions in the world, 
Lorenzo sets his mind to working hard at Jim Barker's garage and saving for 
their old age. Then elderly Mrs. Carmichael asks him to help move an ancestral 
portrait fastened above a fireplace in her old Colonial home. There he discovers a 
secret passageway, which Mrs. Carmichael is sure must lead to the treasure 
legend says is buried somewhere around the house. With sinking heart. Belle 
hears the news . . . she foresees Lorenzo's losing his job at the garage, while he 
once more concentrates on a will-o'-the-wisp fortune. But Lorenzo, if you know 
him as well as Belle does, is not content to be embroiled in just one fantastic 
problem — no, he must have still other outlets for his energy! He finds this 
through Pierre Olivet, a suave Frenchman with a beautiful ward who is reputedly 
one of the wealthiest girls in the world. Olivet has rented a house in the neigh- 
borhood and seeks Lorenzo's aid because, he says, his ward is being threatened by 
letters from a mysterious stranger ... he won't go to the police, feeling the 
publicity would ruin his ward's chances for happiness in this country. Belle 
suffers through Lorenzo's feverish activity of detecting, treasure-hunting 
and, finally, the great social activity which attends his sleuthing in the Olivet 
home. Meanwhile, she busies herself with publicity for a local charity which 
will exhibit a million dollars' worth of jewels. Lorenzo, Olivet and the local 
sheriff plan the guarding of these gems . . . the wily Frenchman actually plotting 
to steal them on the night of the exhibition. Olivet hides the jewels in a 
secret passageway from his house — which connects with the one in Mrs. 
Carmichael's home! Lorenzo and Mrs. Carmichael find them there and 
believe them to be her hidden treasure. The local police pounce upon Olivet, 
as he threatens the two with a gun over possession of the gems, and lead him 
off to jail. Lorenzo is disappointed because he is not the hero of the 
occasion. And Belle is once more forced to realize that, if you can't change 
your husband, you might as well go along with him and have fun. 

Karl Swenson (left) is Lorenzo Jones, M-F, 5.30 P.M. EDT, on NBC: for Procter & Gamble. 



51 



G 



odfrey's boy— 
Julius La Rosa 



It was just like in the movies — and now Julius pinches himself 

to make sure the blessings showered on him by Godfrey are really coming true 

By CHRISTOPHER KANE 




^ 





Julius' gay, youthful parents (above) have reason 
to beam with pride, ever since he made that debut 
with Godfrey, while still in Navy uniform (left). 



You know the old success story. About the 
man who started out selling shoelaces, and 
he worked so hard he was able to get himself 
a pushcart . . . and he saved all his money and 
rented a store — and then his uncle died and left 
him a million dollars. 

To Julius La Rosa, the twenty-two-year-old 
singer on Arthur Godfrey's radio shows, that 
joke's no joke. Julius started out singing like 
Sinatra, and he sang so hard he was able to get 
himself into the All-City chorus . . . and he piled 
up his experience and spent a year with the Navy 
Band — and then Arthur Godfrey gave him a 
job. The Godfrey part's the miracle. Because 
Godfrey's one man influential enough to take an 
average, nice-looking (Continued on page 81) 



Julius La Rosa is heard on Arthur Godfrey Time, M-F, 
10-11:30 A.M., for Toni, ReaLemon, Rinso, Pepsoderit, 
Pillsbury, Nabisco, Chesterfield, on CBS (simulcast, 
CBS-TV, Mon. through Thurs., at 10:15); King Arthur 
Godfrey's Round Table, Sun., 5 P.M., CBS, for Kingan 
& Co.; Arthur Godfrey and His Friends, Wed., 8 P.M., 
CBS-TV, for Chesterfield, Pillsbury, Toni. All EDT. 



53 



Sentimental 



THEY WANTED TO KNOW MORE ABOUT EACH OTHER—SO ALICE FROST 




It was a lovely wedding — but Alice had a typically Pamela-isb reason for being jittery during the ceremony! 



54 






Twosome 



\ND HER HUSBAND MADE A JOURNEY INTO THE PAST 



ti !Am f) oiki 




Every Tuesday night over CBS, a gay, smart, pert woman named Pam 
North wends her scatterbrained way through adventure — to solve 
murders, discover swindlers, help her husband and the police 
lock up two-time losers — in the exciting drama entitled Mr. and Mrs. 
North. For nine years, Alice Frost — in real life as gay, smart and pert 
as Pam — has enveloped herself in Pam's personality and, for half an hour 
each week, lived the exciting life of her radio counterpart. • 

Now, in real life Alice is married — not to a publisher — but to a 
vice-president of a large New York advertising agency, in charge of radio 
and television production. She has never scared up a good murder, 
much less solved one. But, beyond that, Alice and Pam are as alike as two 
peas in a pod. Pam is first and foremost an optimist, so's Alice. Pam is 
quite adept at looking beyond the bare face and circumstances of an 
individual to find the real person — the good and worthwhile qualities. 
So is Alice. Above all, Pam is a sentimentalist, and so is Alice, 
to the nth degree. There is, obviously, a close bond of friendship and 
understanding between these two "intimate friends." 

Just ask anyone who has ever worked with her whether they think 
Alice is' as adept as Pam at finding the best in people. They'll quickly and 
positively answer, "Oh, yes ... if not more so!" Even though a 
husband's vote on this question might be (Continued on page 70) 

Mr. and Mrs. North is heard on CBS, Tues., 8:30 P.M. EDT, for Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. 




Belated honeymoon: The Tuttles 
toured Europe, posing on a Swiss 
glacier — and with a "Beefeater"- 
at the historic Tower of London. 



Their apartment's filled with art 
objects — including Hugh Walter's 
pastel portrait of Alice herself. 



Alice and Bill dote on weekends 
in the country — when their busy 
city-bound scheduler allow time. 








55 





wedding miracle 




The Bride and Groom program 
gave us a fabulous wedding, a 
wonderful honeymoon and memories 
to be cherished forever 




By LEON COOPER 



It couldn't have happened but it did. The bride is 
now definitely my wife— and that was far from be- 
ing a certainty once— and we have beautiful mem- 
ories of a television wedding and a honeymoon in 
Palm Springs. That latter part seems incredible. Never 
in our fanciest dreams did we imagine our honeymoon 
would be so fabulous. None of it would have been 
possible but for the TV show, Bride and Groom, and 
my own stubborn belief that I was the only man in 
the world for Eileen. But how I went about convincing 
her is quite a story. 

First you should know about me. I'm now twenty-six 
years. old, a science teacher in a Brooklyn public school, 
a frustrated ball player — turned down twice in try-outs^ 
for the Dodgers— and I've always been happy-go- 
lucky, at least I was until I met Eileen in April of 1950. 
I fell in love then and I was— alternately— feverishly 
miserable or deliriously happy. 

Our meeting was strictly accidental. We were both 
majoring in physical and health education at Brooklyn 
College, so it was quite natural that we should meet 
in a folk dance class. We were doing a lively dance 
called the Karabushka. I was wearing a sweat suit 
and Eileen was in one of those gym outfits girls wear. 
As far as I was concerned, she couldn't have been more 
captivating if she had been (Continued on page 79) 



I didn't see Eileen's gown until just before the 
ceremony. She looked so lovely I could have cried. 



Bride and Groom, Mon.-Thurs., 11:15 A.M. EDT; Fri. 11 A.M.; 
on CBS-TV; sponsored by General Mills, Hudson Paper Napkins. 



56 



THIS IS NORA DRAKE 




Spencer's wife, Irene, follows Dr. Martinson and Nora Drake up the stairs to Gloria's apartment. 
She has a gun and tells them both she will use it if they make a sound or give any warning to police. 




58 



a story of fateful decision 



To Nora, events of the past 
twenty-four hours had a dream- 
like quality. Was it true 
that she was more deeply involved 



than ever — in murder? 



Nora Drake's emotions were spent, but her mind 
wouldn't stop busying itself with the events of the 
last few hours. Was it possible that this latest 
episode was going to land her in -even deeper trouble 
with the police, with her friends, with everyone whose 
life she touched? Nora thought back to a few hours 
before, when she agreed to take Dr. Martinson to meet 
Spencer's wife. . . . Dr. Martinson's wife Peg had died 
recently under mysterious circumstances, and the police 
were on the trail of her chauffeur, Spencer. The latter's 
wife, Irene, had begged Nora to bring Dr. Martinson to 
see her, and Nora, believing Spencer innocent, per- 
suaded the doctor to accompany her. The events that 
followed had an unreal, dream-like quality in Nora's 
mind. Irene, using a gun on Dr. Martinson and Nora, 
forced them to go to the apartment of her girl friend, 
Gloria, who was in a semi-hysterical state when they 
entered. Nora could still hear her screaming voice as 
she tried to tell them Spencer was there wounded — 
perhaps dead. Nora found herself feeling for Spencer's 
pulse, which was beating feebly. Dr. Martinson, in pro- 
fessional manner, had insisted that Spencer be taken to 





Nora finds herself feeling for Spencer's pulse and, to 
her relief, finally locates its feeble beat. Spencer is 
alive! Does he hold the key to Peg Martinson's murder? 



Awakening momentarily, Spencer pleads with Nora and 
Dr. Martinson to operate in the apartment. He's afraid a 
hospital will demand an investigation of the shooting. 



See Next Page m 

59 



THIS IS NORA DRAKE— 

a story of fateful decision 




Irene forces Dr. Martinson to admit that he can operate 
on Spencer in the apartment. She holds her gun ready in 
case he tries to flee when they go to pick up his bag. 



Pictured here, as on the air, are: 

Nora Drake Joan Tompkins 

Ken Martinson David Gothard 

Irene . Ann Shepherd 

Spencer Ralph Bell 

Gloria Ruth Gilbert 

This Is Nora Drake is heard over CBS, Monday through 
Friday, 2:30 P.M. EDT; sponsored by Toni and Air- Wick. 




At a neighborhood drugstore, 



the hospital. Near-alcoholic, he appeared frightened, 
completely uncontrolled at the thought of operating 
on Spencer. Irene, however, gun in hand, commanded 
Dr. Martinson to probe for the bullet and remove 
it. Reluctantly, the doctor agreed to operate if sup- 
plies could be obtained. Still with gun in hand, Irene 
accompanied him to his apartment and the drugstore 
for the supplies. During their absence, Spencer re- 
gained consciousness and Nora pleaded with him to 
tell the truth about Peg Martinson's death. Suspicious 
of her motives, he refused to talk. Then came the 
nightmare scene when Irene and Martinson returned 
to Gloria's apartment. Martinson at first pleaded to 
remove Spencer to the hospital — with fear obviously 
the motivation behind his pleading. Then, failing to 



60 





Spencer regains consciousness. Nora pleads with 
him to tell her what he knows about the mysterious 
death of Peg Martinson. Suspicious, he refuses. 




Martinson picks up supplies as Irene follows gun in hand. 



Dr. Martinson, with Nora's aid, performs the oper- 
ation. His hands shake as he operates for the first 
time without alcohol to give him false courage. 



convince Irene, he demanded a drink before operating. 
Irene, firm, hard, unrelenting, insisted that he start 
probing for the bullet. To Nora, it was an ironic sight, 
watching the shaking, alcoholic hands of Dr. Martin- 
son probing for a police bullet in an effort to save the 
life of the man who may have murdered his wife. As 
he completed the operation Irene produced a drink. 
Nora watched as the doctor reached for the glass, then 
firmly put it down as if to say the stuff was out of his 
life forever. Miraculously, he found that he had taken 
the first step toward beating the plague of liquor. . . . 
Will Dr. Martinson be saved from himself only to be- 
come involved, along with Nora, in the murder in- 
vestigation to such an extent that he faces ruin any- 
way? Can these events ever be explained to the police? 




THIS IS NORA DRAKE— 
a stnrv of fateful decision 




THIS IS NORA DRAKE— 
a story of fateful decision 




Irene forces Dr. Martinson to admit that he can operate 
on Spencer in the apartment. She holds her gun ready in 
case he tries to flee when they go to pick up his bag. 



Pictured here, as on the air, are: 

Nora Drake Joan Tompkins 

Ken Martinson David Gotbard 

Irene Ann Shepherd 

Spencer Ralph Bell 

Gloria Ruth Gilbert 

Tlii* Is Noru Drake is heard over CBS, Monday through 
Friday, 2:80 I'M. KDT; sponsored by Toni and Air-Wick. 




At a neighborhood drugstore, 



the hospital. Near-alcoholic, he appeared frightened, 
completely uncontrolled at the thought of operating 
on Spencer. Irene, however, gun in hand, commanded 
Dr. Martinson to probe for the bullet and remove 
it. Reluctantly, the doctor agreed to operate if sup- 
plies could be obtained. Still with gun in hand, Irene 
accompanied him to his apartment and the drugstore 
for the supplies. During their absence, Spencer re- 
gained consciousness and Nora pleaded with him to 
tell the truth about Peg Martinson's death. Suspicious 
of her motives, he refused to talk. Then came the 
nightmare scene when Irene and Martinson returned 
to Gloria's apartment. Martinson at first pleaded to 
remove Spencer to the hospital— with fear obviously 
the motivation behind his pleading. Then, failing to 



Dr. Martinson picks up supplies as Irene follows gun in hand. 



convince Irene, he demanded a drink before operating. 
Irene, firm, hard, unrelenting, insisted that he start 
probing for the bullet. To Nora, it was an ironic sight, 
watching the shaking, alcoholic hands of Dr. Martin- 
son probing for a police bullet in an effort to save the 
life of the man who may have murdered his wife. As 
he completed the operation Irene produced a drink. 
Nora watched as the doctor reached for the glass, then 
firmly put it down as if to say the stuff was out of his 
life forever. Miraculously, he found that he had taken 
the first step toward beating the plague of liquor. . . . 
Will Dr. Martinson be saved from himself only to be- 
come involved, along with Nora, in the murder in- 
vestigation to such an extent that he faces ruin any- 
way? Can these events ever be explained to the police? 




Spencer regains consciousness. Nora pleads with 
htm to tell her what he knows about the mysterious 
death of Peg Martinson. Suspicious, he refuses 




Dr. Martinson, with Nora's aid. performs the oper- 
ation. His hands shake as he operates for the first 
time without alcohol to give him false courage 




Heartbreak Child 



By 

VANESSA 
DALE 




SHOULD A YOUNG BO\ 




These are the people rebellious Beanie faced: Grandma and Aunt Vanessa — who wanted to help; mother 
Meg and Grandpa, whose bitter personal conflict blinded them to Beanie's great need for understanding. 



ALL the way across the country, from New 
York to Barrowsville, I wondered if I were 
doing the right thing. Beanie, my nephew, 
was in trouble, in serious trouble. He's only 
eight years old and from the very beginning of 
his young life he has been caught in the middle 
of family antagonisms, family troubles, that 
have left him bewildered and unhappy. Right 
at the moment, the principal at Beanie's school 
had persuaded my father — who is, of course, 
Beanie's grandfather — that it was best that 
Beanie be removed from the school and sent 
away. My heart ached for Beanie, for once 



more he was being shoved from one situation 
into a strange new one, with little promise that 
the next would be better than the last. 

Beanie is a boy who has had all the advan- 
tages that money can buy, and yet none of the 
advantages of love and understanding that 
parents could give {Continued on page 85) 



Love of Life is seen M-F, 12:15 P.M. EDT. CBS-TV, for 
Whitehall Pharmacol Co. As pictured the cast includes: 
Reanie, Dennis Parnell : Vanessa, Peggy McKay: Meg, Jean 
jVlcBride; Grandpa, Edwin Jerome: Grandma, Jane Rose. 



It took an unusual happening to bring Beanie and Grandpa together in the way Vanessa had hoped for. 
But could any advice from Grandma change Meg's willful ways — which had led to involvement in murder? 




I BEANIE BE FORCED TO PAY FOR HIS PARENTS' INDISCRETIONS? 



63 



I 



V 



'v. 




KJ JLJL V^ «^ JLJJLJ- XJB. 1 U U H \J XJ W 



Heartbreak Child 



By 

VANESSA 
DALE 








Zsttzsszzsz^^jszz^iszz 




=* 



■V 






SHOULD A YOUNG BOY 



All the way across the country, from New 
York to Barrowsville, I wondered if I were 
doing the right thing. Beanie, my nephew 
was in trouble, in serious trouble. He's only 
eight years old and from the very beginning of 
his young life he has been caught in the middle 
of family antagonisms, family troubles, that 
have left him bewildered and unhappy. Right 
at the moment, the principal at Beanie's school 
had persuaded my father— who is, of course 
Beanie's grandfather— that it was best that 
Beanie be removed from the school and sent 
away. My heart ached for Beanie, for once 



more he was being shoved from one situation 
into a strange new one, with little promise I hat 
the next would be better than the last. 

Beanie is a boy who has had all the advan- 
tages that money can buy, and yet none of the 
advantages of love and understanding that 
parents could give (Continued on page 85) 



Love o{ Life is seen M-F, 12:15 P.M. EDT. CBS-TV for 
Whitehall Pharmaral Co.' As pictured the rust im hides' 
Beanie, Dennis Parnellj Vanessa, PeggyMoKayiMegJeaii 
MoHndc: Crandpa, Edwin Jerome; Grandma, Fane ti 



It took on unusual happening to bring Beanie and Grandpa together in the way Vanessa had honed for 
But could any advtce from Grandma change Meg's willful ways^-which had led to involvement Zurder? 




^^- ills ^r "< 
IKE BEANIE BE FORCED TO PAY FOR HIS PARENTS' INDISCRETIONS? 




MhbHtili 



bi 



A member of the breed of young performers whose talents 
have been developed almost exclusively on television, 
Leslie Nielsen has been featured in more than one hundred 
TV dramas since his first part back in 1949. A familiar figure 
on all the top TV dramatic shows, Les started his career as a 
nineteen-dollar-a-week disc jockey on a radio station in 
Calgary, Canada. 

He was born in Regina, Saskatchewan, on February 11, 1926. 
His father, a Canadian Mountie, was transferred to the Far 
North when Les was six months old, and he grew up in Ed- 
monton, Alberta. In 1943, after he was graduated from high 
school, Les joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. After his 
discharge in 1945, Les hitchhiked to Los Angeles with dreams 
of a movie career in his knapsack. But Hollywood turned out 
to be a cold, cold place to Les. Everything he tried there 
seemed to go against him. Les, discouraged, hitched back to 
Canada. 

It was then that he started working for nineteen dollars a 
week as a disc jockey, but nineteen dollars seemed a pretty 
small reward for his work, and Les rebelled. He went to the 
Academy of Radio Arts in Toronto, where he won a scholar- 
ship to the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York. A season 
of summer stock in Boston followed, and then TV, where the 
young actor finally found his medium. 



who's who in 




When Jane Morgan got her first job with the Boston Light 
Opera Company at twenty-five dollars a week, she never 
dreamed that one day she would portray the laughable, lovable, 
pixillated landlady of Eve Arden on Our Miss Brooks. 

She got that first job after she was graduated from the New 
England Conservatory of Music with a thorough training in 
violin and voice behind her. Voice was more fun, of course, 
because it gave Jane the chance to use her acting ability, as 
well. Her violin training came in handy in a romantic way, 
for her understanding of that instrument made her just the 
kind of girl Leo Cullen Bryant wanted to marry. He was a 
violinist with the opera company when they met, and after 
their marriage he became the conductor of the orchestra. 

As her singing roles got bigger, giving Jane more opportunity 
to act, she began to realize that it was acting she really en- 
joyed. Finally deciding to devote all her energies to dramatic 
work, Jane joined a stock company as leading woman, and 
was soon touring the country with such stars as Charlotte 
Greenwood and Barbara Stanwyck. In 1920, Jane made her 
radio debut on a program which featured the old-time movie 
actor, Lew Cody. 

Miss Morgan and her husband live in San Fernando Valley, 
where they spend much time listening to classical music and 
playing with their granddaughter — the Bryants' major hobby. 



|0uC kiMOwi 



64 



There will always be a warm spot for a bull fiddle in Virginia 
Gregg's heart — for it was a bull fiddle that got her the first 
break on radio. One of the most sought-after actresses in radio 
today, Virginia began her career as a bull-fiddle player on a 
Pasadena radio network, in company with five musical girl 
friends who called themselves the Singing Strings. After a 
year on their first network, the girls moved to another station 
and played eighteen months before Virginia got her first chance 
for a dramatic part. 

The bull fiddle was sold immediately, because Virginia, who 
had always wanted to act, was determined never to return to 
music-making again. But actually she had no reason to worry 
for, after that performance,' Virginia found herself in great de- 
mand, was cast in every variety of radio role. She has por- 
trayed everything from a seven-year-old girl to a ninety-year- 
old mother, little boys, harridans, Spanish senoritas, women of 
English nobility, and French peasants. At present, Virginia is 
regularly heard as Dick Powell's patient girl friend on Richard 
Diamond and as Betty Barbour on One Man's Family. Away 
from the mike, Virginia is Mrs. Jaime Del Valle. Her husband 
is the director of the Richard Diamond program. The Del 
Valles have two sons — ages, three and one — and three Great 
Danes. Virginia and Jaime share a great interest in radio and 
music, and the bull fiddle, of course. 



RADIO-TV 




i'Mm/L (jf\ 



With accents soft, and manner suave, a new radio person- 
ality transports his listeners into that land of romance 
where the language is the same for all. The mere turn of a 
dial to ABC every day is the passport — the personality, Valen- 
tino. Taking his name from that heartbreaker of the Twenties, 
this latter-day sheik bears a striking resemblance to the 
first Valentino. 

Barry Valentino was born in Landover, Maryland, thirty- 
two years ago. His father, a Hindu, supervised his education 
and engaged private tutors to instruct Valentino in a wide 
variety of subjects. An accomplished linguist, he speaks Span- 
ish, Italian, and German fluently. He is a fine pianist, and his 
voice was trained for the concert stage. 

Actually, it was through his singing ability that he got his 
big break. Vincent Lopez, the orchestra leader, discovered 
Valentino singing in a small club and asked him to join his 
band as vocalist. From that spot, he was noticed by ABC 
people — hence, his present program. 

A great lover of the outdoors, Valentino is an expert horse- 
man, and enjoys fishing and hunting as well. 

Asked to describe his ideal woman recently, Valentino replied 
that he had none. He believes that there is something beautiful 
about all women — and most women agree that there is "some- 
thing" about Valentino. 




VAtw 



65 




Now that Audrey's making a home for herself, she's embroidering linens — 
keeping them in a "hope chest" which hints at another home still to come. 



HE STAR OF MEET MILLIE SAYS: "IT JUST TAKES A LITTLE GOOD SENSE 



66 



I 



f you must leave home- 



tyAdmWfot 






Recently I was visiting my mother in her home 
in Los Angeles. It was right after a 
broadcast of Meet Millie and Mother had evidently 
been discussing my performance with her friends just 
before I arrived. After the usual greetings and 
introductions, she turned to me and proudly said: 

"You know, Audrey, we think you're just as good as 
the professional actresses." 

I smiled quietly to myself and later when I was back 
home in my own Westwood apartment, which I 
share with my sister Collette, I started thinking about 
this remark, and it suddenly brought back a flood of 
memories. All at once, I was a little girl again and 
my mother and father were comforting me with the idea 
that, after a while, I'd get over the notion of being an 
actress — didn't all girls go through this at some time 
or another — and, as soon as I was through with 
high school, I'd be wanting to go on with my college 
education just as my brothers and sisters would when 
they were old enough. But as high school finished — and 
with it my appearances in high school plays — my 
only ambition was to play act for the rest of my life. 

Did you ever feel that sometimes it is necessary 
to lose much to prove a point? I sometimes think we 
stop dreaming our dreams when we try to make them 
into realities — if we succeed, we become happy 
human beings; if we fail, we have to depend all our 
life on just the substance of which dreams are made. I 
believe that if, at this turning point of my life, I 
hadn't been determined to do everything in my power 
to become an actress, I would have settled back to 
depending on my family — and (Continued on page 91) 



Audrey Totter is heard in the title role of Meet Millie, Sun. 
at 9 P.M. EDT, over CBS; sponsored by Wrigley's Chewing Cums. 



BUILD A HAPPY, WONDERFUL LIFE" 



Calls for radio and films keep 
both the phone and Audrey busy. 
Offhours — when she's not reading 
scripts for her career — then she 
"sews a fine seam" just for fun. 




67 



E. 



1 HE STAR OF MEET MILLIE SAYS: "IT JUST TAKES A LITTLE GOOD SENS] 



66 




Now that Audrey's making a home for herself, she's embroidering linens 
keeping them in a "hope chest" which hints at another home still to come. 



lllK STAB OF MEET MILLIE SAYS: "IT JUST TAKES A LITTLE GOOD SENSE 



I 



f you must leave home- 




Recently I was visiting my mother in her home 
in Los Angeles. It was right after a 
broadcast of Meet Millie and Mother had evidently 
been discussing my performance with her friends just 
before I arrived. After the usual greetings and 
introductions, she turned to me and proudly said: 

"You know, Audrey, we think you're just as good as 
the professional actresses." 

I smiled quietly to myself and later when I was back 
home in my own Westwood apartment, which I 
share with my sister Collette, I started thinking about 
this remark, and it suddenly brought back a flood of 
memories. All at once, I was a little girl again and 
my mother and father were comforting me with the idea 
that, after a while, I'd get over the notion of being an 
actress — didn't all girls go through this at some time 
or another — and, as soon as I was through with 
high school, I'd be wanting to go on with my college 
education just as my brothers and sisters would when 
they were old enough. But as high school finished— and 
with it my appearances in high school plays — my 
only ambition was to play act for the rest of my life. 

Did you ever feel that sometimes it is necessary 
to lose much to prove a point? I sometimes think wc 
stop dreaming our dreams when we try to make them 
into realities — if we succeed, we become happy 
human beings; if we fail, we have to depend all our 
life on just the substance of which dreams are made. I 
believe that if, at this turning point of my life, I 
hadn't been determined to do everything in my power 
to become an actress, I would have settled back to 
depending on my family — and (Continued on page 91) 



Audrey Totter is heard in die title role of Meet Millie, Sun. 
at 9 P.M. EDT, over CBS; sponsored by WrigieyV < hewing Guma 



r BUILD A HAPPY, WONDERFUL LIFE" 



Calls for radio and films keep 
both the phone and Audrey busy. 
Offhours — when she's not reading 
scripts for her career— then she 
"sews a fine seam" just for fun. 







^bk-tkmd 





Gazing out at New York's East River, Mike and 
Buff dream of happy holidays past, others still 
to come — then drink their coffee, dress, and go 
over the day's work with director Judd Whiting. 




vacation 



time 



Mike Wallace and Buff Cobb 
have timely tips for both solo 
travel and husband-wife trips 

By FRANCES KISH 



Mike (Wallace) and Buff (Cobb), favorite 
husband-and-wife team on CBS television, 
have some definite ideas about vacations. 
How to plan them, where to take them, what to 
do on them, whether husbands and wives should 
take separate vacations, whether an unattached 
girl should go off on a trip alone, how to make 
the most of vacation budgets, and how to come 
back feeling that you've had a wonderful time. 

The fact that they don't always agree on all 
these points makes their comments that 
much more enlightening, because you get the 
masculine viewpoint, the feminine angle, and the 
general advice of two people who do agree 
that: (1) Vacations are wonderful things. 
(2) Everyone is a tourist at heart and likes to get 
around and see new sights. There is even 
advice for the stay-at-home vacationist. But 
wait, it's Mike talking first. Buff, of course, 
will get the last word. 

Mike: We think a (Continued an page 92) 

Mike and Buff are seen daily, M-F, 2:45 P.M.; also Sat. 
at 9 P.M. on All Around the Town. Both EDT, on CBS-TV. 



HOW NORA LAGEY LOST 05 LBS. WITH 
THE ANN DELAFIELD REDUCING PLAN 

A New, Easy, Natural Way to Lose Weight 
and Gain a Richer, Fuller Life 






EFORE AND AFTER MEASUREMENTS 





BEFORE 


AFTER 


LOSS 


Bust 


45" 


35" 


10" 


Waist 


37" 


27" 


10" 


Thigh 


26" 


20'/j" 


5'/2" 


Calf 


1 5V." 


14" 


W" 


Arm 


13" 


lO'/i" 


2'/:" 


Weight 


198 lbs. 


133 lbs. 


65 lbs. 




Nora Lacey's doctor examined her after her 
loss of 65 pounds and found her to be in ex- 
cellent physical condition. Her letter to Ann 
Delafield tells a typical story of the great hap- 
piness achieved by those who have followed 
the Ann Delafield Reducing Plan . . . 



"Dear Miss Delafield: Now at last I am able 
to do the things that I have wanted to do 
for years. After losing 65 pounds, I am not 
ashamed to go skating, dancing and to have all 
the fun that I missed before. It's like being 
born all over again at the age of twenty-five!" 

Sincerely, Nora Lacey, Brooklyn, New York'' 

'Address on request from RexaIl,Los Angeles 






What you get with the Ann Delafield Reducing Plan: 

A 116-page book giving you Ann Delafield's new, 
easy Appetite Reducing Plan, including suggested 
menus and vital beauty tips. 

A 30-day supply of Ann Delafield Appetite Re- 
ducer not a drug, but a delicious, non-fattening, 

scientifically-produced supplementary food that in- 
cludes low calorie Skim Milk Powder and Soy Bean 
Flour. 

A 30-day supply of the Ann Delafield Vitamin Cap- 
sules . . . scientifically prepared according to the 
Recommended Dietary Allowances, Food and Nu- 
trition Board, National Research Council in 1948 
for women on a 2000 calorie or less reducing diet, 
except for the omission of Thiamine, which has a 
tendency to increase your appetite. 



"It's like being born all over again at the 
age of twenty-five!" Nora Lacey wrote 
the famous beauty consultant through 
whose help she lost 65 pounds. "My life 
is fuller and richer since I took the Ann 
Delafield Appetite Reducing Plan!" 

Nora Lacey is one of thousands . . . 
virtually hundreds of thousands . . . who 
have achieved amazing success with 
Ann Delafield's help. During the last 
forty years this famous dietician, teacher 
and beautician has received acclaim 
from all over the world for her easy, 
natural principles of weight reduction. 
And now her method is offered to you 
in the Ann Delafield Reducing Plan . . . 
a plan that is bringing happy results 
to women (and men) who have never 
been able to successfully lose weight! 

IT'S EASY . . . IT'S FUN 

No wonder the Ann Delafield Plan is 
so popular! You don't count calories. 
You don't feel starved. You even have a 
piece of cake for dessert! Yes, you can 
"eat your cake and have IT, too." Miss 
Delafield has prepared generous, appe- 
tizing, yet low-calorie menus for you 
and gives you a choice — depending on 
how fast you want to lose weight. Pupils 
find it an easy way to reduce that doesn't 
take the fun out of life. 

HERE'S WHY YOU DON'T FEEL STARVED 

The secret of the amazing success of 
Miss Delafield's plan is a scientifically 
produced . . . and delicious '. . . wafer 
called the Ann Delafield Appetite 
Reducer. Miss Delafield's pupils have 
called it "the greatest blessing a hungry 
person ever had." This wafer was con- 
ceived after years of practical experi- 
ence and endless hours of consultation 
with physicians and dieticians. Those 
between-meal hunger pangs, so fa- 
miliar to anyone who has ever suffered 
through an ordinary reducing plan, are 
quickly satisfied with the Ann Delafield 
Appetite Reducer Wafer. 

BE HAPPY-BE SLENDER! 

Why go on letting excess pounds keep 
you too self-conscious and tired to have 
the fun that should be yours? If your 
doctor has told you that your problem 
is not due to a glandular disturbance or 
organic causes, start on your way to 
slender beauty with the Ann Delafield 
Reducing Plan today. The complete 
package . . . containing everything you 
need . . . costs just $6.95 (repeat pack- 
age, $5.95). For this low price you get 
not only your Appetite Reducer Wafers 
. . . but also your Vitamins . . . plus a val- 
uable book that will become one of 
your best friends ! 



SOLD AT REXALl DRUG STORES EVERYWHERE 



DRUGGISTS OF AMERICA 



69 



(Continued from page 55) 
considered somewhat biased, it is, never- 
theless, true that this quality was one of 
the things which first attracted Bill to tall, 
lovely, blonde, blue-eyed Alice Frost — 
long before the question of Pam North 
entered the picture. 

Their first meeting took place in the 
fall of 1939.. Alice had been playing the 
title role of the daytime serial, Big Sister, 
for four years when one day a young 
man by the name of Bill Tuttle arrived 
at the studio to take over the directing 
chores of the program. 

"No, it wasn't love at first sight, al- 
though I did like and admire Bill right 
away . . . admired him for his talents as 
a director, and liked him for his under- 
standing and fairness with the members 
of the cast. I think what I most liked 
about him was his attitude toward our 
cast. He gave every actor the same re- 
spect. A bit player was just as important 
to Bill as the star — which in this particu- 
lar case was me. 

You might say ours was a coffee-cup 
romance. Many were the hours we worked 
together over scripts and soggy paper 
cups of stale, cold coffee. At first, it was 
merely stimulating to watch this man 
revise and revamp scripts to get the most 
out of scenes and characterizations. Little 
by little, through these sessions, we got 
to know quite a bit about each other, and 
little by little those script meetings be- 
came longer and longer. Here I think 
Pam and I would have differed — being 
considerably less reserved and cautious 
than I, she would have fallen in love 
with Bill on the spot. 

"I'm sure I don't know exactly when it 
happened, but somewhere along the line 
we fell in love, and in June of 1941, right 
after my last broadcast of Big Sister, we 
were married." 

The wedding took place at the Pound 
Ridge, New York, home of one of Alice's 
closest friends, Janet Cohn, well-known 
play broker. Janet was her maid-of-honor, 
and brother, Carl, gave her away. In lieu 
of "live" music, Dick Liebert, the organ- 
ist for Big Sister, cut a record of the Wed- 
ding March to be played at the ceremony. 
Unbeknownst to Alice, the minister — since 
it was an outdoor wedding — had agreed to 
allow movies to be taken throughout the 
entire ceremony. 

"So, when the cameras didn't cease 
action as the actual ceremony started, I 
began to worry," explains Alice. "I didn't 
want anything to spoil my wedding, and 
I worried through the entire ceremony 
. . . worried for fear the minister would 
become rattled by the sound of the cam- 
eras constantly grinding away. Afterward, 
I found out I was the only one who came 
anywhere near being rattled . . . because 
I was the only one who didn't know that 
everyone else knew. Or do I sound like 
Pam?" 

After the ceremony, Alice and Bill 
motored to Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 
where they had planned on a brief stay 
at a little inn recommended by friends. 
And brief it was. Much to their horror, 
at breakfast the next morning they found 
they were the only couple at the inn under 
seventy. Hardly the proper atmosphere 
for a honeymoon. So back they came to 
New York to spend the rest of the week 
at the Waldorf. 

D 

"Then we did something," continues 

M Alice, "that I think Pam North would 

have approved of. I can practically hear 

her referring to it as our 'sentimental 

70 



Sentimental Twosome 

journey.' We took another two weeks and 
motored out to the Midwest to retrace 
our childhoods . . . show each other where 
we had been born, and where some of the 
highlights of our adolescent years had 
taken place . . . and show each other off 
to our respective families. I'm from 
Minneapolis, while Bill's Chicago-born. 
We really had great fun. We stayed with 
Bill's folks for several days — resulting in 
quantities of background material on the 
man I married. Then we proceeded on 
to Minneapolis to see my mother — where 
Bill picked up quite a bit of the family- 
album type of thing. Then on to the 
little town of Mora, Minnesota, where my 
father had been minister of a Lutheran 
church — the church in which Mother had 
played pipe organ while I sang — and fi- 
nally back home by way of Niagara Falls. 
Yes, I guess Pam would be right. It really 
was a sentimental journey." 

"Home" to the newlyweds was a brand- 
new five-room apartment overlooking the 
East River in the Sutton Place section of 
New York. In fact, it still is. But Alice's 
hobby of decorating, redecorating, and 
re-redecorating has resulted in the lay- 
out of the apartment being the only thing 
to remain intact . . . that, and the piano 
she had before their marriage. 

"Before we were married," Alice ex- 
plains, "my apartment was furnished in 
Early American, while Bill's was modern. 
So I stored most of my furniture — for 
that 'home in the country' some day — with 
the exception of the piano and a few 
smaller pieces which would harmonize 
with modern. And, over the years, we've 
added and replaced until now we have 
a happy blending of modern, Early Ameri- 
can and French." 

The living room is predominantly mod- 
ern' — deep-green walls relieved by stark- 
white trim and wall candelabra. Sectional 
pieces upholstered in light, flowered fab- 
rics, light wood end -tables, and a large 
circular, light wood Louis XV coffee table 
add warmth and coziness to the room. 
The deep-gray and pink bedroom com- 
bines French and modern. The tremen- 
dous bed and sectional dressers are 
modern, while the smaller pieces, includ- 
ing night tables, a little gray desk and a 
chaise longue, are French period pieces. 
Alice herself has refinished most of the 
bedroom furniture. 

The library, which also doubles as 
hobby and guest room, houses her fabu- 
lous "Alice in Wonderland" collection. 
Scattered throughout the floor-to-ceiling 
bookcases, which line two sides of the 
room, are dolls and figurines inspired by 
the beloved Lewis Carroll classic. On 
the other two walls hang copies of the 
original Tenniel illustrations, drawn es- 
pecially for Alice by Madeleine Pierce, 
along with a Luis Van Rooten map of 
the famous fable. 

The story-book motif is even carried 
over into two lamp shades — Alice selected 
a few pages containing some of her favor- 
ite Lewis Carroll quotations and shel- 
lacked them to parchment shades. Not 
only do these make attractive and un- 
usual lamps, but they have their practical 
side, too — act as handy reference pieces. 
"Can't you just see Pam," laughs Alice, 
"referring to lamp shades and coming up 
with some vital statistics!" 

Because of their extremely busy sched- 
ules, the Tuttles do not migrate to the 
country during the summer months. "The 
general beat-the-heat exodus," says Alice, 
"doesn't really affect us ... in fact, it 
would be silly of us to run away from our 



delightful river breeze. Besides that, 
commuting with our irregular hours 
would take away all the enjoyment of a j 
few scattered hours on a lawn." 

Alice is kept on the move with Mr. and 
Mrs. North, Mama — in which she portrays 
Mama's younger sister, Trina — and the 
daytime serial, The Second Mrs. Burton, 
as well as roles on many of the well- 
known radio and TV dramatic shows. 
And Bill's work calls for frequent — gen- 
erally sudden — out-of-town trips. So they 
save the country for free weekends, when 
they hop into their car and head for either 
a Connecticut golf course or an "as-the- 
spirit-moves" drive through lovely New 
England. 

"When it comes to golf," confesses Alice, 
"the less said about me, the best. Bill is 
the golfer, has been ever since he was a 
young boy. Even at his worst, he's good. 
Many is the long, tedious hour he has 
put in trying to bring about a closer 
understanding between me and my clubs 
... with very little noticeable success. 
I like the game, but somehow or other 
don't seem to be able to get the knack of 
it. So I do what I consider to be a 'nat- 
ural' for Pam North— go along for the 
walk. Bill says I'm just great at locating 
lost balls!" 

But, when it comes to baseball, or foot- 
ball or the roller derby, Alice is right in 
there pitching— in the bleachers, that is. 
As a defense against Bill's great enthu- 
siasm for these sports, Alice took it upon 
herself to learn as much about the games 
as possible, and it's now hard to tell 
which is the greater fan. "Actually," 
continues Alice, "we do very little enter- 
taining any more. When we have a free 
evening, you can generally locate us at 
one of New York's stadiums, TV- viewing 
in our living room, or attending a theatre. 
Those are our three major mutual relaxa- 
tions. 

"As for the daytime hours, when I'm 
alone and not on a redecorating spree, I 
manage to keep busy pursuing my own 
pet interests . . . psychology, philosophy 
and singing. As a child and young girl, I 
sang quite a bit — mostly in my father's 
church. After graduation from high school, 
I won a scholarship to the MacPhail 
School of Music in Minneapolis, where I 
studied voice and dramatics. Actually, 
I came to New York with a musical-com- 
edy career in mind. However, I soon 
discovered that considerable more train- 
ing in the art of putting over a popular 
song was needed — I had been trained for 
concert work rather than musical comedy. 
But, before I could get around to further 
instruction, I found myself acting. 

"On only two programs have I ever 
used my singing voice — on the original 
Walter O'Keefe show, we used to have 
great fun doing satire on some of the 
better -known operas — such as 'Carmen' 
— and on the Stoopnagle and Bud show, 
I sang comedy songs. Since then, every- 
thing has been straight acting. However, 
I've never really given up my first love, 
musical comedy, and recently, at the 
suggestion of several professional friends, 
I picked up from where I had left off 
years ago. Whether or not I'll ever sing 
professionally is hard to say, but at least 
I'm enjoying my studies. 

"And whether or not Pam North would 
approve of a musical-comedy career is 
strictly problematical — but, you know, I 
have a distinct feeling she might be just 
the girl to do it. Maybe some day I'll 
give her the chance!" 



My Life Is Simply Perfect 



(Continued jrom page 33) 
herself and help her to be more like me, 
because I'm extremely happy even if I'm 
not wealthy). One son would be called 
Darnay and by now he'd be four, and 
then there would be little Toni, just two. 
But the main thing I guess I'd teach 
Evelyn is that, with all this crowding her 
life, she wouldn't have time on her hands 
— most of her unhappiness is a result of 
her not having enough to do. There just 
isn't time for trouble when you have the 
kind of days that the real me, Toni, has. 

After I breakfast with Bill and the 
children and take the youngsters across 
the park to pre-school, I spend most of 
the morning doing the million-and-one 
things every housewife does: Plan menus, 
make out marketing lists, order things we 
need from the department stores (I never 
have time to go shopping), take care of 
the laundry and dry-cleaning, clean out 
closets or bureau drawers as nobody else 
could possibly do it for me, and deal with 
correspondence, tradesmen and all the 
million-and-one things that go into build- 
ing a home. 

By two-thirty I'm ready for Evelyn 
Winters rehearsal, followed by the pro- 
gram at three-forty-five (EDT), five days 
a week. Now comes the real race with 
the clock! At four, I dash madly from the 
ABC studio on West 66th Street in Man- 
hattan, hurl myself into a cab for as fast 
a trip downtown to Radio City as possible, 
and rush into an NBC studio where I 
was due at four to rehearse for Just Plain 
Bill in which I play Bill's daughter, Nancy. 

Naturally, I wouldn't change places with 
Evelyn for anything, but I'll admit I'm 
often tempted to, in my thoughts, for it's 
sometimes hard to try to maintain a 
smoothly running home and a normal 
family life. In fact, I'm sure I couldn't 
succeed at all if it weren't for Bill. And 
to think that I might have missed out 
altogether in ever meeting Bill, let alone 
marrying him! But that's another story. 

To explain about that, I'd better go 
back a bit in history. I was born in Chi- 
cago, where my father and mother still 
live. Though my father is a doctor, all 
four of us children were infected with 
show business virus early in life — through 
Mother, who used to be in silent films. 
From the time I was eight I studied danc- 
ing, singing and acting at the Chicago 
Art Theatre, where my teacher was the 
wonderful Madame Lazareth who is still 
teaching at Hull House. There was never 
any question but that my sisters and 
brother and I had to be on the stage. 

I went to Northwestern University at 



night for one year, after I graduated from 
high school, rushing from class to dance 
in a night club. But, when I was nineteen, 
I decided it was Broadway for Toni, so I 
came to New York. While I was making 
the usual young-actress rounds of pro- 
ducers' offices, many of the other stage 
hopefuls I knew kept urging me to au- 
dition for radio shows. "It's a much 
steadier income, and you still have time 
free to look for stage work," my friend 
Wana Paul told me. 

I never had any desire to do radio, but 
Wana was so insistent that I finally did 
audition for a few advertising agencies 
and "package" firms — producers who are 
not connected with a radio station, but 
who develop a complete program, with 
cast and script, and sell it as a "package" 
to a station or sponsor. 

And then, of course, I got a job in a 
stage show. "So much for radio," I said 
as I left for the pre-Broadway opening 
in Philadelphia. The show was "Sadie 
Thompson," a musical based on the play 
"Rain," starring June Havoc and directed 
by Rouben Mamoulian, and I felt very 
happy to be singing and dancing in the 
chorus. It was slated to open November 
16, 1944, on Broadway, and all my fondest 
dreams were about to be realized. 

But I guess my guardian angel was 
watching over me. While we were in 
Philadelphia, I got a call to come back 
to New York and read for the leading 
role in a new radio serial to be produced 
by one of the "packagers" I had auditioned 
for. I got permission to skip rehearsal 
one afternoon, took the train to New York, 
and swept into the producer's office, 
where several other girls were waiting. 

"I've got to get back to my show in 
Philadelphia," I said, so they let me read 
first. When I was asked to wait and do a 
second reading, I could hardly conceal 
my impatience, and kept looking signifi- 
cantly at a Pennsylvania Railroad time- 
table. They listened to a couple of other 
girls, then let me read again and I dashed 
for my train. Almost before I got back 
to Philadelphia, I received a call to send 
my picture and credits to the producer by 
return mail, special-delivery. A week 
later, I read again and was offered the 
role of Evelyn Winters. 

I may not be the only girl in New York 
who made her Broadway debut and her 
radio debut within four days of each 
other, and I may not be the only actress 
who left her first Broadway show to con- 
centrate on radio acting, but I'll bet there 
aren't very many others around. With 
"Sadie Thompson" opening on the six- 



listen to 




HOLLYWOOD LOVE STORY 



A complete romantic drama presented 

on each program. Cal York, 

famed PHOTOPLAY Magazine reporter, 

digs into Hollywood's love 

life for these heart-palpitating 

stories. Also latest 

Hollywood news. 



Every Saturday morning, 1 1 :30 A.M. EDT, NBC 



teenth and The Strange Romance of 
Evelyn Winters starting on the twentieth 
of November, I found it impossible to do 
both, and Evelyn won. I've never been 
sorry. 

It was during the early days of Evelyn 
Winters that I met Bill. Bill had written 
a play and when the leading lady who 
was to read it didn't show up, I was asked 
to read the part. But for this coincidence, 
I might never have met him and six 
months later eloped with him to Elkhart, 
Maryland, where we were married in 
March, 1947. 

Now, thanks to Bill, my life is simply 
perfect. Bill is a free-lance writer of 
radio and television scripts, and does 
most of his work at home, so he's usually 
there when the children are around and 
can take care of any of the little emer- 
gencies that come up in all homes with 
small children. This relieves my mind a 
great deal and -makes it possible for me 
to concentrate on my work. As an extra 
added attraction, Bill is a wonderful 
cook, and fixes fabulous meals on the 
maid's night out and when we give din- 
ner parties. I guess we'd never be able 
to have our friends in, if it weren't for 
this talent of Bill's, and I appreciate the 
results of his hours in the kitchen as 
much as any guest. 

We both love the same things, so when 
we have an "evening out" together we 
never have a problem deciding what to 
do. We just head for a favorite restau- 
rant, usually one which specializes in 
something exotic, and then go to the 
theatre. (Now that we're married, we 
usually manage to get there before the 
curtain goes up!) We are both crazy 
about New York City, and wouldn't 
dream of living anywhere else. In fact, 
when we want to spend a weekend alone 
together, we don't take off for the country 
or a resort. We take a room in a Man- 
hattan hotel and just pretend we're out- 
of-towners on a vacation! 

Evenings when we're home together, 
we're quite the settled married couple. 
Sometimes Bill works through the even- 
ing on a script, and at other times he 
throws himself into one of the hobbies 
he's always going in for. Right now. it's 
painting and photography. I mend the 
children's clothes, or write letters, or 
sometimes indulge myself by going to 
bed and reading — next to the theatre, 
reading is my great enthusiasm. It's 
really a rare night when you see Mr. 
and Mrs. Elwood Hoffman stepping out 
on the town, because we love our hours 
at home so much. 

Our big dream, right now, is to buy a 
hous.e, right in the heart of Manhattan. 
I'd like for it to be like the house in which 
we have our apartment now — a lovely 
old brownstone with huge rooms, ' high 
ceilings, fireplaces, and conveniently near 
a park and a school for the children. This 
house, on Stuyvesant Square, was once 
the home of Tammany boss Murphy, and 
in its day was the height of elegance. We 
love our apartment, which occupies an 
entire floor overlooking the park, but it 
isn't really large enough for two busy 
people and two growing children. So we 
dream about "our" house, and when I 
have extra time I wander around gazing 
at the ones I'd like to own. 

Yes, I'm glad I'm Toni Darnay. I may 
not have an abundance of time, but I do 
have a super-abundance of happiness. It 
doesn't take time to be happy. It just 
takes Bill, and Darnay and Toni. Some- 
day I must tell Evelyn Winters. Then M 
maybe she'll find her way to happiness, 
too! 

71 



The Kind of Man You Marry 



(Continued from page 35) 
over the telephone — the girl had a young, 
attractive Naval Lieutenant on her hands 
for the evening and she was going to be 
tied up and wouldn't Jane be kind enough 
to take the young man off her hands? He 
was just up for the weekend from San 
Diego and really he was nice, and really 
it wouldn't involve anything except Jane's 
going out to dinner with him — 

What kind of a drip — Jane's thoughts 
ran parallel to her friend's chatter — would 
this be who was in town for Saturday 
night and didn't have a date? Especially 
if he's all she says he is. I really don't 
think I want to go but, on the other hand, 
maybe I should . . . she's done me favors 
so many times . . . including the last loan 
which I haven't paid back yet and. . . . 
Aloud Jane said, "All right, send him 
over tonight." 

As time for the date approached, Jane 
regarded herself in the mirror. Her pert, 
oval-shaped face was bright and shiny, 
and she hesitated over whether or not she 
should glamorize herself. She ran a comb 
through her short, poodle-cut blonde hair 
and straightened the line of her lipstick. 
She shrugged her shoulders and thought, 
This is my day of rest, and to heck with 
this young Lieutenant if he can't stand me 
as I am. 

At the sound of the doorbell, Jane 
opened the door with as pleasant a smile 
on her face as she could muster. But the 
smile quickly faded into a look of utter 
dismay — the tall, red -headed Lieutenant 
was obviously no drip — he was a dream! 
As Jane stood there awkwardly for a mo- 
ment, she took in his dress uniform, his 
neat and positively shining quality. And 
then she found herself hurriedly seating 
him in the room's most comfortable chair, 
trying to force a drink upon him, trying 
to get him to read a magazine while she 
went in and powdered her face and put 
on a dress that was newer than the last 
summer's model she was wearing. Taking 
a final look at herself before she faced 
the Lieutenant again, she found herself 
repeating his name, John Baker, nice 
nrm?. He'd said he was from where? 
Whittier, California — that pretty little 
town not twenty miles from where she 
lived. Golly, she thought, he's really some- 
thing! 

There's the little fact that Jane modest- 
ly overlooked — she's pretty something her- 
self . . . petite, curvy in just the right 
places, blonde, and blue-eyed . . . the 
Lieutenant was meeting an unusually at- 
tractive gal. 

But that Saturday night she was any- 
thing but the calm, poised actress she's 
supposed to be. Her pert, flippant per- 
sonality, just right for the characterization 
of Big Town's Lorelei, wasn't ringing quite 
true. She was too excited, for some strange 
reason. 

The evening started off well, in spite of 
the fact that Jane recommended a popular 
spot for dinner — "and the food was just 
awful." John was too polite to criticize. 
He was even greater than his build-up. 
Truth was, John was too smitten to care. 
For John and Jane dined, danced and 
talked. They had such fun, and Jane 
thought: Why, this is the first boy I've 
ever been with, whom I've felt like this 
about — we just agree on everything. Then, 
he said it! "Will you marry me?" 

R Oh, he's just kidding, thought Jane to 
herself, maybe it's a new line. But, if he 

M weren't. . . . Though Jane didn't show it, 

she was more than excited by the proposal. 

And, as they parted, Jane gave John her 

/ z 



phone number, then hurried upstairs to 
fall asleep and dream. The dream was all 
about a certain Lieutenant. 

The next morning came but John Baker 
didn't call. Nor the next day, nor the next. 
Jane felt crushed, depressed and angry 
in turn. So it was a line! Well, she was 
awfully glad she'd been smart enough to 
see through it all the time. After all, 
everyone had always said she should 
marry an older, sophisticated man — and 
maybe she should. What did this John 
Baker matter? She had her career to con- 
sider. She didn't have time for love now. 
She wasn't looking for it. She didn't ex- 
pect it. Then came a call from her angry 
girl friend. Why had Jane stood John up? 
Jane couldn't contain the wild joy her 
heart felt when she learned from her 
friend, on that following Wednesday, that 
John had tried and tried to call her. In 
her excitement, she had given him the 
wrong telephone number. Jane laughed 
as she learned that John thought she, 
too, was giving him the brush-off. Her 
laughter had a slightly hysterical quality 
to it. 

So the very next evening they met 
again. "Will you marry me?" he asked 
again. Jane looked at him for a long 
instant. Nothing had ever happened this 
fast before. She knew that he meant it. 
His eyes were just too honest. And she 
felt in her heart and soul it was right. 
She was relieved to say, this time, "Oh, 
yes, tomorrow." ("After all, I didn't want 
him to think I was too eager," she kid- 
dingly adds now, in recalling her re- 
action.) 

It was about three in the morning when 
Jane left John. She had made him solemn- 
ly promise he wouldn't tell a soul about 
their plans. Once home, however, she put 
in a hurried call to her own mother in 
nearby Long Beach. "Funny," recalled 
Jane, "Mom was so surprised she didn't 
sleep the rest of the night. And, at six 
o'clock the next morning, she was on my 
doorstep ringing the bell." 

Jane convinced her mother that he was 
wonderful! Of course it was sudden, but 
this was it. She just knew this was it! And 
so her mother agreed. Then Jane hurried 
down to Nancy's, a local dress store. "Now, 
they didn't even open until noon that day," 
she said, "but I pounded so hard on the 
big glass door that they had to let me in. 
I picked out a pretty gray gown and hat 
to match and hurried home to pack." 

When John — who hadn't told a soul — ar- 
rived at Jane's apartment, there sat his 
bride-to-be's mother, father, sister and 
the entire family of assorted relatives to 
greet him. Jane saw the surprise on his 
face. "Now, John," began Jane lamely, 
"I can explain — " 

But John only laughed and met the 
family. They were .charmed by his easy- 
going manner. Dad approved of his solid, 
down-to-earth approach and agreed that 
his plans of owning a potato ranch in the 
San Joaquin Valley sounded fine. Mom 
liked his tender, devoted attitude toward 
Jane. And the rest of the family thought 
him just great. John made .such a wonder- 
ful impression on the family that Jane 
felt more than ever that her instincts had 
been completely right. In a daze, Jane 
went through the next twelve hours and 
came to consciousness only when John 
turned to her and said, "You pick out our 
wedding spot, dear." They were on the 
main street of Las Vegas, and it seemed 
the millions of bright neon signs were 
turned on her. "Wedding chapel," blinked 
one. "Marryin' Sam," beckoned another. 
Jane saw one, away from the others, and 



pointed. "There," she said, unhesitatingly. 

The Wee Kirk of the Heather was a 
small, quiet chapel. What with the twenty- 
four-hour courtship, the sudden decision 
to marry, the hasty shopping, and the race 
to Las Vegas, it was a blessing to Jane to 
feel the quiet chapel walls around her. 
They were reassuring, and once again the 
feeling overcame her that everything was 
as it should be. 

The brief weekend that followed was 
wonderful but a blur. Jane can't even re- 
- member the name of the hotel where they 
stayed. John had to report to a Naval 
base in Oregon the very next Monday, 
and so Jane found herself back in Holly- 
wood, alone, until she had finished making 
the first of the Big Town television features 
and could join him. 

A few weeks later, they shared their 
first "home" alone for a whole week in 
San Diego.. "It was only a motel," laughs 
Jane, "but it had a kitchen and it was our 
honeymoon house." 

Because John was due to be shipped 
overseas at any moment, Jane wanted 
every minute with him she could have. 
They just loafed, laughed, shared fun, and 
became more convinced their love was a 
great and a wonderful thing. "We've never 
even argued," she confessed, "because we 
have nothing to argue about. Some people 
may think that quick marriages are no 
good — that problems will come up that 
can't be solved. Our only problem is that 
we haven't any problems!" 

Jane wanted John to see her perform as 
Lorelei and rented a television set espe- 
cially for the occasion. "You know," said 
Jane, mystified, "I don't think John 
wanted to see me. He dallied over dinner, 
talking more than he usually does, and 
seemed to do everything he could to de- 
lay the procedure." 

"What's the matter," I asked, "don't 
you want to see me?" 

"Of course," he hastily assured me. "But 
I've seen you. In a picture, not too long 
ago," he muttered. 

"But he couldn't remember the name of 
the picture," laughed Jane, "nor the story. 
So I made him sit through Big Town. 
After it was over, I turned and said, 
'Well—' " 

"John looked at me (kind of in relief, 
I think) and said, 'You were good!' I 
think he was surprised that I could act." 

Jane is eager to begin a real life with 
John, as Mrs. Baker. "I'm not used to the 
name — or even being married yet," she 
smiled. "When we were in the motel in 
San Diego, we were naturally registered 
as Mr. and Mrs. John Baker. Yet scripts 
for the TV show came by the bushel ad- 
dressed to Miss Jane Nigh. I had forgot- 
ten to tell the studio my married name. 

"I never knew it could be so much fun 
to be preoccupied with keeping house, 
shopping for dinner and stuff," she said, 
"but I must confess I run out of ideas 
for meals. My John says to plan my 
meals ahead, but how can I plan when 
I don't know what I'm going to have!" 

Today, Jane finds herself on her own 
little cloud. Floating along in a perfectly 
beautiful world. Imagine meeting — and 
marrying — a man whom you'd known less 
than twenty-four hours, and having it be 
so right! Yes, love for Jane came along 
when she least expected it. Who would 
have guessed romance was going to come 
in the guise of a blind date — and what 
kind of a man is it who doesn't have a 
date on Saturday night? 

"The kind you marry," says Jane. 



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Take A Number 



Ladies Fair 
11:25 News, Les 

Nichols 
Queen For A Day 



ABC 



Local Program 
Pauline Frederick 
8:55 John Conte 



Breakfast Club 



My True Story 
Whispering Streets 

Against the Storm 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 
12:15 



12:30 
12:45 



1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 



2:00 
2:15 
2:25 
2:30 
2:45 



3:00 
3:15 



3:30 
3:45 



4:00 
4:15 



4:30 
4:45 



5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 



News 

Kate Smith Show 



Luncheon with Lopez 



Merrill Mueller 
Dr. Paul 



Pickens Party 
Meredith Willson 

Live Like a 
Millionaire 



Life Can Be Beautiful 
Road of Life 

Pepper Young 
Right to Happiness 



Backstage Wife 
Stella Dallas 

Young Widder Brown 
Woman In My House 



Just Plain Bill 
Front Page Farrell 
Lorenzo Jones 
The Doctor's Wife 



Monday 



Curt Massey Time 
Capital Commentary 

with Baukhage 
12:25 News, Frank 

Singiser 
Faith in Our Time 



Cedric Foster 

Luncheon with Lopez 
1:55 News 



Dixieland Matinee 

News, Sam Hayes 
Say It With Music 



Mary Margaret 
McBride 

Daily Double 
2:35FamilyCirclewith 
Walter Kiernan 



Poole's Paradise 



Local Program 
4:25 News, Frank 

Singiser 
Mert's Record Ad- 
ventures 



Lone Journey 
When A Girl Marries 

Break the Bank 



Jack Berch 



Local Program 



CBS 



Renfro Valley 
Country Store 



News of America 
Barnyard Follies 
Joan Edwards Show 
In Town Today 



Arthur Godfrey Show 
with Robert Q. 
Lewis 



Paul Harvey, News 
Ted Malone 



Ladies Be Seated 



Mary Marlin 
Evelyn Winters 



Thy Neighbor's 

Voice 
Dean Cameron 
Manhattan 

Maharajah 



Big Jon and Sparky 
Mark Trail 

B-Bar-B Sings Fun Factory 1. 

5:50 News, Cecil 5:55 World Flight 

Brown Reporter 

1. Tom Corbett Space Cadet (T, Th) 



Evening Programs 



Grand Slam 
Rosemary 



Wendy Warren 
Aunt Jenny 

Helen Trent 

Our Gal Sunday 



Big Sister 
Ma Perkins 
Young Dr. Malone 
The Guiding Light 



Second Mrs. Burton 
Perry Mason 

This is Nora Drake 
The Brighter Day 



Hilltop House 
Art Linkletter's 
House Party 

Carl Smith Sings 
3:55 News 



Johnson Family 
The Chicagoans 

Treasury Bandstand 
4:55 News 



Barnyard Follies 

Hits and Misses 
This I Believe 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


Bob Warren 
6:05 Petite Concert 
Bill Stern 
Three Star Extra 


Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & the News 
You and the World 
Curt Massey 
Lowell Thomas 


7:00 
7:15 

7:30 
7:45 


Richard Harkness 
Echoes From the 

Tropics 
News of the World 
One Man's Family 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 

Gabriel Heatter 
Mutual Newsreel 


Taylor Grant, News 
Elmer Davis 

The Lone Ranger 


Robert Q.'s Wax- 
works 

Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


The Railroad Hour 
Voice of Firestone 


Summer Show 


Henry J. Taylor 
World Wide Flashes 


Suspense 
Talent Scouts 


9:00 
9:05 
9:30 
9:45 


Telephone Hour 
Band of America 


News, Bill Henry 
Crime Fighters 
War Front-Home 
Front 


Paul Whiteman Teen 
Club 


Romance 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:35 


America's Music 

Robert Montgomery 
Dangerous Assign- 
ment 


Frank Edwards 
1 Love A Mystery 
Bands for Bonds 


John Daly, News 
Dream Harbor 
Time For Defense 


Walk a Mile 
Rex Allen Show 



Tuesday 



Evening Programs 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


Bob Warren 
6:05 Petite Concert 
Bill Stern 
Three Star Extra 


Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & the News 
You and the World 
Curt Massey 
Lowell Thomas 


7:00 
7:15 

7:30 
7:45 


Richard Harkness 
Echoes from the 

Tropics 
News of the World 
One Man's Family 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 

Gabriel Heatter 
Mutual Newsreel 


Taylor Grant, News 
Elmer Davis 

Silver Eagle 


Robert Q.'s Wax- 
works 

Edward R. Murrow 


8 

8 
8 
8 


00 
15 
30 
45 


Scarlet Pimpernel 

Barrie Craig, 
Investigator 


Summer Show 


Newsstand Theatre 


People Are Funny 
Mr. & Mrs. North 


9:00 
9:05 
9:30 
9:45 


Life in Your Hands 
Summer Show 


News, Bill Henry 
Official Detective 
Mysterious Traveler 


America's Town 
Meeting of the Air 

E. D. Canahan, News 


The Line-Up 

Louella Parsons 
9:35 Pursuit 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:35 


What's My Line? 

Robert Montgomery 
Stan Kenton Concert 


Frank Edwards 
1 Love A Mystery 

Dance Bands 


John Daly, News 
United or Not 


Candidates & Issues 
Music 



Wednesday 



Evening Programs 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


Bob Warren 
Petite Concert 
Bill Stern 
Three Star Extra 


Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & the News 
You and the World 
Curt Massey 
Lowell Thomas 


7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


Richard Harkness 
The Playboys 
News of the World 
One Man's Family 


Fulton Lewis. Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
Mutual Newsreel 


Taylor Grant. News 
Elmer Davis 
Lone Ranger 


Robert Q.'s Wax- 
works 

Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


First Nighter 
Great Gildersleeve 


Summer Show 


Summer Show 
Top Guy 


Big Town with 

Walter Gre.ua 
Dr. Christian 


9:00 
9:05 
9:30 
9:45 


Groucho Marx. You 

Bet Your Life 
Summer Show 


News. Bill Henry 
Out of the Thunder 
Family Theatre 


Summer Show 
Crossfire 


Yours Truly. 

Johnny Dollar 
Summer Show 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 


Silent Men, Doug 

Fairbanks, Jr. 
Robert Montgomery 
10:35 Portrait of a City 


Frank Edwards 
1 Love A Mystery 
Dance Bands 


John Daly. News 
Dream Harbor 
Latin Quarter 
Orchestra 


Boxing Bouts 

News, Charles Col- 
lingwood 



Thursday 



Evening Programs 



6:00 


Lionel Ricau 


Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & the News 


6:15 


6:05 Petite Concert 






You and the World 


6:30 


Bill Stern 






Curt Massey 


6:45 


Three Star Extra 






Lowell Thomas 


7:00 Richard Harkness 


Fulton Lewis, Jr. 


Taylor Grant. News 


Robert Q.'s Wax- 


7:15 The Playboys 


Rukeyser Reports 


Elmer Davis 


works 


7:30 News of the World 


Gabriel Heatter 


Silver Eagle 




7:45 One Man's Family 


Mutual Newsreel 




Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 


Summer Show 


Summer Show 


Cafe Istanbul. 


FBI in Peace and 


8:15 






Marlene Dietrich 


War 


8:30 


Nightbeat 




Defense Attorney 


Hallmark Playhouse 


8:45 






with Mercedes 










McCambridge 




9:00 Dragnet 


News. Bill Henry 


Ted Mack's Original 


Mr. Chameleon 


9:05 




Rod & Gun Club 


Amateur Hour 


9:25 News 
Stars in the Air 


9:30 


Counter Spy 


Reporters' Roundup 




The Judge 


9:45 






Foreign Reporter 




10:00 


Ohio River Jamboree 


Frank Edwards 


John Daly. News 


Hollywood Sound- 


10:15 




1 Love A Mystery 


Club Can-Do 


Stage 


10:30 Robert Montgomery 


Dance Bands 




Presidential Profiles 


10:35 


Tin Pan Alley 









Friday 



Evening Programs 



6:00 


Lionel Ricau 


Local Programs 


ABC Reporter 


Jackson & the News 


6:15 6:05 Petite Concert 






Dwight Cooke 


6:30 Bill Stern 






Curt Massey 


6:45 


Three Star Extra 






Lowell Thomas 


7:00 


Richard Harkness 


Fulton Lewis. Jr. 


Taylor Grant, News 


Robert Q.'s Wax- 


7:15 


The Playboys 


Mr. Mystery 


Elmer Davis 


works 


7:30 


News of the World 


Gabriel Heatter 


Lone Ranger 




7:45 


One Man's Family 


Mutual Newsreel 




Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 


Roy Rogers 


Summer Show 


Summer Show 


Musicland, U.S.A.— 


8:15 








Earl Wrightson 


8:30 


Bob & Ray Show 




This Is Your F.B.I. 


Big Time with 


8:45 








Georgie Price 


9:00 


Mario Lanza Show 


News. Bill Henry 


Summer Show 


Doris Day Show 


9:05 




Magazine Theatre 






9:30 


Summer Show 


Armed Forces 


Summer Show 


Summer Show 


9:45 




Review 


9:55 News, Win Elliot 




10:00 


Bill Stern 


Frank Edwards 


John Daly. News 


Robert Trout, News 


10:15 




1 Love A Mystery 




10:05 Capitol Cloak - 


10:30 


Robert Montgomery 


Dance Bands 


Sports Page 


room 


10:35 


Pro and Con 









73 



74 



I 



nside Radio 



Saturday 



NBC 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



Morning Programs 



8:30 


Howdy Doody 


Local Program 


No School Today 


Renfro Valley 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Anybody Home 






News of America 
Garden Gate 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 

10:45 


Archie Andrews 

Mary Lee Taylor 
Show 


Local Program 

Bruce MacFarlane, 

News 
Helen Hall 


Space Patrol 


St. Louis Melodies 
Galen Drake 
Quiz Kids 


11:00 
11:15 

11:30 
11:45 


My Secret Story 

Hollywood Love 
Story 


Fun with Classics 
Adventure on Thun- 
der Hill 
U. S. Marine Band 


New Junior Junction 

At Ease, with P.F.C. 
Eddie Fisher 


News, Bill Shadel 
11:05 Let's Pretend 

Give and Take 



Aftf 

12:00 
12:15 
12:30 

12:45 


'rnoon Prog 

News 

Public Affairs 

U. S. Marine Band 


rams 

Man on the Farm 
Fifth Army Band 


101 Ranch Boys 
American Farmer 


Theatre of Today 

Stars Over Holly- 
wood 
12:55 Cedric Adams 


1:00 
1:15 

1:30 
1:45 


National Farm and 
Home Hour 

U. S. Coast Guard 
Cadets on Parade 


Music 

Dunn on Discs 


Navy Hour 
Vincent Lopez Show 


Grand Central 
1:25 It Happens 

Every Day 
City Hospital 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


Coffee in Washington 
Big City Serenade 


Georgia Crackers 


Front and Center 
Treasury Band 


Music With the Girls 
Make Way For Youth 


3:00 

3:15 

3:30 
3:45 


Down Homers 
U. S. Army Band 


Bandstand, U. S. A. 
3:25 News 
Sport Parade 


Pan American Union 

Lone Pine Moun- 
taineers 


Report From Over- 
seas 

Adventures in 
Science 

Farm News 

Correspondents' 
Scratch Pad 


4:00 

4:15 

4:30 
4:45 


Win, Place or Show 
Musicana 


Caribbean 
Crossroads 

Finnegan's Box 
Scores 

Hawaii Calls 


News 

International Jazz 
Club 


Stan Dougherty 
Presents 

Cross Section, U.S.A. 


5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


Mind Your Manners 

Author Speaks 
Key to Health 


Harmony Rangers 

Bands For Bonds 
Pee Wee Reese 


Roseland 

At Home With Work 
Club Time 


Music Festival 
Treasury Bandstand 



Evening Programs 



6:00 


News, Bob Warren 


Smiley Whitley 


Una Mae Carlisle 


News, Ed Morgan 


6:15 


H. V. Kaltenborn 




Bible Message 


U.N. On Record 


6:30 


Summer Concert — 


Pentagon Report 


Harry Wismer 


Sports Roundup 


6:45 


Hollywood Bowl 




Talking It Over 


Larry LeSueur, News 


7:00 




Al Heifer, Sports 


As We See It 




7:15 




Twin Views of the 
News 


Bert Andrews 


7:05 At the Chase 


7:30 


Case History 


Down You Go 


Dinner at the Green 


Gunsmoke 


7:45 


Friend of Faith 


7:55 Cecil Brown 


Room 




8:00 


Jane Ace, Disc 


20 Questions 


Saturday Night 


Broadway's My 


8:15 


Jockey 




Dancing Party 


Beat 


8:30 


Ralph Edwards Show 


Summer Show 




Tarzan 


8:45 










9:00 


Meet Your Match 






Gangbusters 


9:15 








9:25 Win Elliot 


9:30 


Grand Ole Opry 


Lombardo Land 






9:45 










10:00 


Summer Show 


Chicago Theatre of 


At the Shamrock 


Stars in the Air 


R 10:15 
K 10:30 




the Air— Summer- 






Chamber Music 


time Concerts 


Dance Music 




M 


Society of Lower 
Basin Street 









Sunday 



NBC 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



Morning Programs 

8:30 String Quartet 


Lyrically Speaking 


Renfro Valley Sun- 
day Gathering 


9:00 
9:15 

9:30 
9:45 


World News Roundup 
We Hold These 

Truths 
Carnival of Books 
Faith in Action 


Elder Michaux 
Back to God 


Milton Cross Album 
Voice of Prophecy 


Trinity Choir 
World News Roundup 

Organ Concert 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 


National Radio 

Pulpit 
Art of Living 
News, Peter Roberts 


Radio Bible Class 
Voice of Prophecy 


Message of Israel 
College Choir 


Church of the Air 


11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
11:45 

Aft* 

12:00 
12:15 

12:30 

12:45 


Faultless Starch Time 
Morning Serenade 
UN Is My Beat 
The Author Speaks 

'rnoon Prog 

Charis Siesta 
Latin American 

Music 
The Eternal Light 


William Hillman 
Health Quiz 
Reviewing Stand 

rams 

College Choirs 

News, Bill 

Cunningham 
Frank and Ernest 


Fine Arts Quartet 
Christian in Action 

Brunch Time 
Piano Playhouse 


Salt Lake Tabernacle 

Choir 
Bill Shadel, News 
11:35 Invitation to 

Learning 

People's Platform 

Howard K. Smith, 

News 
Bill Costello, News 


1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 


Critic at Large 
"Mike 95" 
Univ. of Chicago 
Roundtable 


Fred Van Deventer 
Health Quiz 
Lutheran Hour 
1:55 Gameof the Day* 


Herald of Truth 
National Vespers 


Invitation to Music- 
James Fassett 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


The Catholic Hour 
Hats in the Ring 


Top Tunes With 

Trendler 
Dixie Quartet 
Health Quiz 


Marines in Review 

Sammy Kaye 
Serenade 


The Symphonette 

On a Sunday After- 
noon—Eddie 
Gallaher 


3:00 
3:15 
3:30 
3:45 


Elmo Roper 
America's Music 
Bob Considine 
John Cameron 
Swayze, News 


Jimmy Carroll Sings 
Bandstand, U. S. A. 


This Week Around 

The World 
Billy Graham 




4:00 
4:15 
4:30 
4:45 


The Falcon with Les 

Damon 
Martin Kane with 

Lee Tracy 


Under Arrest 

Matthew Bell- 
Joseph Cotten 
4:55 Bobby Benson 


Old Fashioned 
Revival Hour 




5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


Hollywood Star 

Playhouse 
Whitehall 1212 


The Shadow 

True Detective 
Mysteries 


San Francisco 

Sketchbook 

Heart Strings 


King Arthur God- 
frey's Round Table 

World News, 
Robert Trout 

5:55 News, Larry 
LeSueur 



Evening Programs 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


Tales of Texas 

Rangers 
The Chase 


Sgt. Preston of the 

Yukon 
Nick Carter 
6:55 Cedric Foster 


George E. Sokolsky 
Don Gardner 
Here Comes The 
Band 


Summer Show 


7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


Best Plays 


Affairs of Peter 

Salem 
Little Symphonies 


Concert From Canada 
Great Adventure 


December Bride 
Doris Day Show 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


Meredith Willson's 

Music Room 
Summer Symphony 


Great Day Show 
Enchanted Hour 


Stop the Music 


Frank Fontaine Show 
Philip Morris 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Hats in the Ring 


Open Concert 
John J. Anthony 


Drew Pearson 
Meet Corliss Archer 

Three Suns Trio 


Meet Millie 
Inner Sanctum 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 


Meet the Press 
American Forum 

* Appr 


This Is Free Europe 
ox. time— Midwest & 


Paul Harvey 
Gloria Parker 
Bill Tusher in 
Hollywood 
Southern areas only. 


Robert Trout, News 
10:05 The People Act 
The Choraliers 



TV program highlights 

NEW YORK CITY AND SUBURBS AND NEW HAVEN CHANNEL 6 JULY 11— AUGUST 10 



Baseball on Television 



Before the game: 








Knothole 


Gang with Happy Feltc 


n 9 




■ Day with the Giants with Laraine Day 1 




Yankee Preview with Joe DiMag 


^io 11 


DATE 


TIME 


CAME CHANNEL 


Fri., July 11 


2:25 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Sat., July 12 


1:55 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Sun., July 13 


2:00 P.M. 


* Detroit vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Mon., July 14 


2:25 P.M. 


Detroit vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Tues., July 15 


8:25 P.M. 


Cleve. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Wed.-Thurs. 


2:25 P.M. 


Cleve. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


July 16-17 








Fri., July 18 


2:25 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Sat.-Sun., 


2:00 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


July 19-20 








Mon., July 21 


8:20 P.M. 


Brooklyn vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Tues., July 22 


8:20 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Giants 


11 & 6 




8:30 P.M. 


Cine. vs. Dodgers 


9 


Wed., July 23 


1:30 P.M. 


Cine. vs. Dodgers 


9 


Thurs., July 24 


1:20 P.M. 


St. Louis vs? Giants 


11 & 6 




1:30 P.M. 


Cine. vs. Dodgers 


9 


Fri., July 25 


1:20 P.M. 


Cine. vs. Giants 


11 & 6 




8:30 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Dodgers 


9 


Sat., July 26 


1:20 P.M. 


Cine. vs. Giants 


11 & 6 




1:30 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Dodgers 


9 


Sun., July 27 


1:50 P.M. 


*Cinc. vs. Giants 


11 & 6 




2:05 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Dodgers 


9 


Mon., July 28 


8:30 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Dodgers 


9 


Tues., July 29 


8:20 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Giants 


11 & 6 




8:30 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Dodgers 


9 


Wed., July 30 


1:30 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Dodgers 


9 


Thurs., July 31 


1:20 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Giants 


11 & 6 




1:30 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Dodgers 


9 


Fri., Aug. 1 


8:20 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Giants 


11 & 6 




8:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Dodgers 


9 


Sat., Aug. 2 


1:20 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Giants 


11 & 6 




1:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Dodgers 


9 


Sun., Aug. 3 


2:05 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Dodgers 


9 




2:20 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Giants 


11 & 6 


Tues., Aug. 5 


8:20 P.M. 


Brooklyn vs. Giants 


11 & 6 


Wed.-Thurs., 


1 :20 P.M. 


Brooklyn vs. Giants 


11 & 6 


Aug. 6-7 








Fri., Aug. 8 


8:20 P.M. 


Boston vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Sat., Aug. 9 


1:55 P.M. 


Boston vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Sun., Aug. 10 


2:00 P.M. 


Boston vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 



Monday through Friday 



7:00 A.M. Today • 4 & ti 

Garroway's wake-up edition, including news, special events and 

entertainment for two hours from Radio City. 

10:30 A.M. Arthur Godfrey Time • 2 

Fifteen minutes of Arthur's regular radio show on video. 

M0:4S A.M. Your Surprise Store • 2 & ti 

Funster Lew Parker, assisted by glamorous Jacqueline Susann, 

with stunts, brain-teasers and a swap session. 

11:15 A.M. Bride and Groom • 2 

Come to the wedding as John Nelson emcees, Phil Hanna sings. 

11:30 A.M. Strike It Rich • 2 

Heart-rending interviews by Warren Hull as worthy contestants 

strive to earn as much as $500 in cash. 

12:00 Noon The Egg and 1 • 2 

Sunny-side up entertainment in this daytime serial. 

12:00 Noon Huth Lyons' 50 Club • t & H 

Ruth with music and song and her own ingratiating talks. 

12:15 P.M. Love of Life • 2 & ti 

Betty McCay as Vanessa Dale, an advertising woman, and her 

sympathetic, understanding handling of others' problems. 

12:30 P.M. Seareh for Tomorrow • 2 & 6 

Daytime serial accenting trials and problems of an American 

family torn between conflicts of two generations. 



1 :30 P.M. Garry Moore Show • 2 & 6 

The irrepressible Mr. Moore with a full hour of variety. 

2:30 P.M. First Hundred Years • 2 

Jimmy Lydon and Anne Sargent as the struggling newlyweds. 

3:00 P.M. Big Payoff • 4 & ti 

Couples, with the husband on the spot, vie for prizes that begin 

with women's accessories and end with a trip to Paris. 

3:30 P.M. Mel Torme Show • 2 & 6 

While Bert Parks vacations, the "velvet fog" blows in. 

3:30 P.M. Johnny Bugun Show • 4 

The handsome Irish tenor and Barbara Logan in music and 

capers with a lot of fun participation bv the studio audience. 

4:00 P.M. Kate Smith Show • 4 & ti 

The summer show will feature the two Bills (Goodwin and 

Cullen I with Robin Chandler and Katey, herself, on film. 

5:00 P.M. Hawkins Falls • 4 

The laughs and tribulations of life in a typical small town. 

7:30 P.M. Those Two • 4 & 6 

Comic Pinky Lee and vocal-lovelv Martha Stewart in skits. 

7:30 P.M. Broadway TV theatre • 9 

Legitimate plays. ex-Broadway successes, presented full-length 

with live cast. New vehicle each week. 

7:45 P.M. News Caravan • 4 & 6 

A round-up of the day's news events with John Cameron 

Swayze. 



Monday P.M. 



»:GO P.M. Quiz Kids • 4 

Joe Kelly quizzes his erudite moppets from Chicago. 
tt:SO P.M. Godfrey's Talent Scouts • 2 

Vrthur may be on vacation but showcasing of talent goes on. 
tt:30 P.M. Concert Hour • 4 & ti 

Great music of all times, starring: July 14. Thomas L. Thomas, 

baritone: July 21, Mildred Miller, mezzo-soprano; July 28. 

Christopher Lvnch. tenor. Each in thirty-minute recitals. 

8:30 P.M. Washday Theatre • 7 

Forget the laundry with feature-length Hollvwood films. 

9:00 P.M. Lights Out • 4 

Hollow-voiced Frank Gallop with sleep-haunting tales. 

9:30 P.M. llobert Montgomery Presents • 4 

The big. hour dramatic show continues through the hot summer. 

I0.-00 P.M. Summer Theatre • 2 & ti 

Lighter offerings, as Studio One relaxes, with some repeats of 

winter plays. Betty Furness is your hostess for the hour. 



Tuesday 



IteOO P.M. Feature Film • 2 

H:00 P.M. Juvenile Jury • 4 & B 

Uncle Miltie gives over to Jack Barry and his panel of junior- 
sized experts who discuss the problems of their contemporaries. 
tt:30 P.M. Sport Quiz • 4 & ti 
Expert sport announcer. Bill Stern, is quizmaster. 
9:00 P.M. Boss Lady • 4 

A new dramatic series, filling in during the "dog days" until 
Fireside Theatre returns in cool, cool September. 
9:30 P.M. Circle Theatre • 4 
Excellently cast and produced original video plays. 
lO-.OO P.M. Banger • 2 

Tight, suspenseful drama in this weekly treat for whodunit fans. 
10:00 P.M. Original Amateur hour • 4 & ti 
Ted Mack, once Major Bowes' righthand man, continues in the 
great tradition with opportunity for amateurs of all ages. 
10:00 P.M. On Trial • 7 

Pro and con views of vital issues expressed by top government 
officials and congressmen with their distinguished counsel. 



75 



TV program highlights 



Wednesday 



0:00 P.M. Godfrey and His Friends • 2 & 6 

Substitute Frank Parker, as Godfrey goes a'fishin'. 
0:00 P.M. Heritage • 4 

This is Kate Smith's nighttime replacement: Heritage, a proud, 
beautiful musicale, originating from the nation's capital. 
0:00 P.M. Adventure Playhouse • 5 
DuMont's established weekly presentation of fine full-length 
film fare from Hollywood or London studios. 
0:00 P.M. Strike it Rich • 2 & 6 
Strong men cry as Warren Hull introduces needy contestants 
who vie for $500 in the quiz, and touch the heart of the nation. 
0:00 P.M. Kraft Theatre • 4 

Superb, hour-long plays. Mostly originals, cast in New York. 
9:00 P.M. Ellery Queen • 7 

Suave Lee Bowman acts the role of the adventuresome crimi- 
nologist with Florenz Ames cast as his father, Inspector Queen. 
9:30 P.M. The Web • 2 
Blood-curdling melodrama. 

10:00 P.M. International Boxing Club • 2 & G 
Boxing continues from outdoor arenas, when available, with 
possible supplementing by sport newsreels. 



Thursday 



0:00 P.M. You Bet Your Life • 4 & G 

Film returns of Marx madcaps. 

0:00 P.M. Hollywood Offbeat • 7 

Melvyn Douglas, as a private eye, solves Hollywood crime cases. 

0:30 P.M. Chance of a Lifetime • 7 & 6 

Dennis James, gives contestants the kiss of gold when they 

answer correctly on this well-known quiz show. 

9:00 P.M. Man Against Crime • 2 

Brawny actor Ralph Bellamy in his tireless crime-cracking. 

9.-00 P.M. Dragnet • 4 

Exciting, realistic crime drama. Alternate weeks Gangbusters, 

video version of radio series. 

9:00 P.M. Royal Playhouse • 5 

Popular feature films reissued for TV, in one hour length. 

10:30 P.M. Foreign Intrigue • 4 

Terrific suspense melodrama, filmed in Europe for video. 

10:39 P.M. Author Meets the Critics • 5 

Plenty of excitement as controversial books and their authors 

are put up for dissection. Quentin Reynolds as moderator. 



Friday 



7:30 P.M. Stu Era in • 7 

Stu and wife, June Collyer, present the funny side of domestic 

chaos. Sheila James and Ann Todd as their daughters. 

0:00 P.M. Arthur Murray Dancing Party • 2 & G 

The dancing master's gracious wife with a delightful variety 

show, replacing Mama for the summer duration. 

0:00 P.M. Curtain Call • 4 

Noted producer, Worthington Minor, who gained renown with 

Studio One, has moved to NBC and this is his first new show. 

0:30 P.M. Pantomime Quiz • 2 

Two Hollywood teams compete in a variation of charades. 

0:30 P.M. We, the People • 4 & 6 

As the political battle gets as hot as the weather, WTP turns 

its full attention to dramatic and entertaining campaign issues. 

9:00 P.M. Doorway to Danger • 4 & G 

Summer crime series while Big Story takes its usual hiatus. 

0:00 P.M. Down You Go • 5 

Dr. Bergen moderates on the Chicago scene. 

9:30 P.M. Our Miss Brooks • 2 

The wonderful and humorous Eve Arden turns off the heat and 

turns on the fun in a great video version of her radio show. 

9:30 P.M. Campbell Playhouse • 4 & 6 

Half-hour film shows with Hollywood actors take over for The 

Aldrich Family, gone to the mountains for a summer vacation. 

10:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Stars • 5 

Big hour of variety with big names. Comic Larry Storch, emcee. 



Saturday 



12:00 Noon Big Top • 2 & 6 

You supply the peanuts, Ringmaster Jack Sterling comes on 
with sensational circus variety in the big ring. 
.7:00 P.M. Italian Feature Film • 9 
From the great film studios of Italy: July 12, "Marco Visconti," 
starring Carlo Ninchi; July 19, "Bazaar of Ideas," Lilian Her- 
mann; July 26, "Risky Game," Antonio Candusio; August 2. 
"Song of the Continent," Angelo Musco; August 9, "A Sea of 
Troubles," Umberto Melnati. All films with English titles. 
7:30 P.M. Beat the Clock • 2 

Emcee Bud Collyer takes contestants over the hurdles as, they 
attempt parlour stunts to earn merchandise prizes. 
7:30 P.M. One Man's Familg • 4 & G 
You're a welcome guest at the Barbours until July 19 for the 
following Saturday, American Inventory takes over for the 
summer. 

0:00 P.M. Feature Film • 2 
0:00 P.M. All Star Revue • 4 
Headline comedians continue to rotate. 
0:00 P.M. All Around the Town • 2 
Husband-wife team, Mike Wallace and lovely Buff Cobb. 
9:00 P.M. Blind Date • 4 & G 
Femcee Arlene Francis acts as chaperone. 
9:30 P.M. Feature Film • 2 

9:30 P.M. Saturday Night Dance Party * 4 & G 
Big-name dance bands set up their bandstand in your living 
room. Jerry Lester emcees. 

10:30 P.M. Assignment Manhunt • 3 & 6 
Snooky Lanson and company take a breather while killers try 
to escape the hot breath of the pursuing investigator. 



Sunday 



11:45 A.M. Joe DiMaggio's Dugout • 4 

The great ex-star of the Yankees with big league guests. 
5:00 P.M. Super Circus • 7 (& G at 5:30 P.M.) 

Top-flight circus variety with Claude Kirchner, ringmaster. 

tf:30 P.M. It's News to Me • 2 

John Daly is the host. 

7:00 P.M. Royal Showcase • 4 & G 

Hollywood star comic, Jack Carson, is your host to a half-hour 

of variety with guest stars and Gordon Jenkins orchestra. 

7:30 P.M. Lucky Clues • 2 & G 

Mystery panel show filling in for the summer for Show Biz. 

7:30 P.M. Meet the Press • 4 

Dixie-tongued Martha Rountree moderates as a panel of news 

reporters fire questions at noted government personalities. 

7:30 P.M. Manhattan Playhouse • 5 

Movie time with full-length features from Hollywood. 

0:00 P.M. Toast of the Town • 2 & G 

Ed Sullivan presents the cream of international talent in his 

full hour of smash vaudeville, with the Toastettes and Ray 

Bloch. 

0:00 P.M. The Biy Payoff • 4 

The popular daytime show with Bess Myerson and Randy 

Merriman. 

0:00 P.M. Information Please • 2 (& G at 0:00 P.M.) 

The show, famous in radio and movie shorts, now on TV with 

headmaster Clifton Fadiman, plus the wit and brilliance of 

John Kiernan, Franklin P. Adams and guest panelists. 

9:00 P.M. Television Playhouse • 4 & G 

Remains open for the summer with usual excellent dramatic 

fare. 

0:30 P.M. Break the Bank • 2 

The quiz show, that in radio and TV has paid out hundreds of 

thousands in cash. Ten questions posed by Bud Collyer. 

10:30 P.M. What's My Line? • 2 

Regular panelists Kilgallen, Cerf, Francis and Block rotate 

their vacations as guests stand in. 

10:30 P.M. American Forum • 4 

Discussion of lively topical issues with Theodore Granik. 



76 



Traveling the Road 
of Life Together 

(Continued from page 36) 
thermometer professionally or find a 
pulse-beat, and never took the Hippo- 
cratic Oath, he did grow up to be a "doc- 
tor" — one of national fame, too. Today, 
Don MacLaughlin is Dr. Jim Brent to 
millions of Americans — the leading char- 
acter of NBC's popular daytime serial 
drama, The Road of Life. 

"I guess I did want to study medicine 
at one time," the tall, good-looking actor 
recalls. "But, I was very young and I 
don't think I had given much thought to 
anything else. I suppose, more than any- 
thing, I was swayed by our neighbors in 
Webster. You know how it is in small 
towns, people always seem to expect the 
doctor's son to become a doctor, too. I can 
remember some of the patients patting me 
on the head, when I'd open the office door, 
and saying, 'My, my, you're getting to be 
more like your father every day.' I sup- 
pose I might have followed his footsteps, 
but Dad passed away when I was only ten 
and I no longer lived under that influence. 

"When I tell people about my early 
background they are quick to say, 'Well, a 
doctor's son! It must be a snap, acting in 
a doctor's role.' I'm sure it has helped 
some, but T was so young then I didn't 
have much of a chance to learn a great 
deal. And, besides, my father was a real 
country doctor who spent the early days 
of his practice winding through the hills 
in horse and buggy, treating horses and 
cows, as well as people. The Dr. Brent in 
our radio drama is more of a specialist, 
of course, armed with the knowledge of 
modern medicine. 

"However, living in small towns practi- 
cally all of my life has been a big help. 
I think it has equipped me with a back- 
ground that enables me to interpret my 
role in The Road of Life. The town I 
live in — Darien, Connecticut — is not un- 
like Merrimac, the setting for our serial. 
The people are pretty much the same. 
Therefore, when I walk into the studio 
each day to do the show it's not like 
stepping out of one world into another, 
as is the case in some roles an actor must 
play. The people in our story are very 
usual. It's just the events that are unusual 
and, of course, a little melodramatic. 

"Then, too, I lead a rather normal life 
with my wife and three children, and I 
think this is a big influence, too. Very 
often, when I play a scene with a fictional 
character, I can parallel it with something 
that has happened at home. For instance, 
I have a daughter, Janet, who is ten — 
approximately the same age as Janie, my 
daughter in the radio play — and sometimes 
I find myself reading lines from the script 
that are just about the same things I 
would say at home. 

"One day we had a scene in the story 
in which Janie was trying to learn to play 
baseball to gain favor with her boy friend, 
and this struck home immediately. My 
little girl, Janet, is a female Peewee 
Reese. She'd rather play baseball than 
eat, and this is an affection we share to 
a certain degree. At any rate, in handling 
my part of the father discussing baseball 
with daughter that day, I think I under- 
stood perfectly just how such a scene 
would go, thanks to Janet." 

There are times, too, when a scene from 
the script will stick with Don and in- 
fluence his thinking after he leaves the 
studio. 

"Recently, my list of undone chores 
around the house had grown to the point 
where it exhausted me to even think about 



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77 



I it," he relates, rather sheepishly, "and 
I had just about reached the conclusion 
that I'd hire a man for a day or two and 
get everything cleaned up with one fell 
swoop. But I found my conscience be- 
traying me, for these were things a man 
should do around his own home. I toyed 
with the problem for a few more days. 

"Finally, one afternoon when I was at 
the microphone as Dr. Brent, I found my- 
self reading lines that said something like: 
'Every man should be able to take care 
of things around his home, fix things that 
need fixing, and make his presence felt.' 
Well, on the commuter train back to 
Darien after the show, these words ran 
through my mind. When I arrived home, 
I found myself almost unconsciously 
changing into my work clothes to tackle 
the chores. I have wondered since if my 
wife and the writers, Charles Gussman 
and John Young, weren't conspiring 
against me." 

Fortyish and ruggedly handsome, with 
blondish hair and blue eyes highlighting 
his features, Don is one of radio's most 
popular and successful actors. He is gen- 
erally known in the trade as "the actor 
with the typical American man's voice," 
although at one time he feared the same 
slight Midwestern twang, which now is 
his fortune, would block his acting career. 

"When I first tried to break into radio 
I was very conscious of the fact that I 
sounded like a Westerner, or Midwest- 
erner, and, frankly, it worried me," he 
tells. "Being in New York, I suppose I 
was more aware of it. But, I can say, 
happily, that it never really hurt me one 
bit. Of course, I never would be cast in 
a Shakespearean role. But, on the other 
hand, if I had trained at the Royal Acad- 
emy, I wouldn't expect to be playing my 
present type of part, either." 

Don, who has been headlining radio 
dramas for the past fifteen years, is in his 
fifth year in the Dr. Brent role. He has 
starred in some fourteen other major net- 
works' series, including Death Valley 
Days, Tennessee Jed and Counter-Spy. 
But, for all his long experience, he re- 
tains great enthusiasm for his work. 

Don makes the one-hour trip from 
Darien to the NBC studios in Radio City 
by train each working day, arriving at 
1:45 P. M. to start rehearsal. The cast 
runs through the script several times 
under the guidance of Director Walter 
Gorman, polishing up lines until the show 
is ready to go on the air at 3:15 P. M. 
After the broadcast, Don usually heads 
right back to Darien, unless he has an- 
other assignment at the studio. 

Once home, he initially hears a critique 
of the show from his attractive wife, Mary, 
who tunes in the broadcast on the car 
radio while she is picking up Janet and 
Britt, who is seven, at school. 

"Mary is a wonderful critic," Don ad- 
mits. "She has no professional theatre 
background and this enables her to speak 
as an average listener. I seek her approval 
on everything we do and her judgment 
has never been wrong. The youngsters 
hear the show, of course. But, since this 
is just minutes after they have been 
turned loose by their teachers, I'm afraid 
they're not too interested in Dr. Brent's 
daily problems." 

The MacLaughlins live in a picturesque 
white stucco house of early American 
vintage. A wavering shingle line gives it 
the effect of a thatched roof, and it is much 
like a large English cottage and stands 
apart from the Colonial-type houses so 
common throughout New England. 
. Actually the house has been converted 
from an old barn and this has brought 
M about a unique arrangement for the eight 
rooms. The living room once was the car- 
riage house and its ceiling is two stories 
78 B 



high, highlighted by massive cross beams 
eighteen inches square. It is bordered by 
a den and a step-down dining room, 
whose ceilings are of weathered wood 
from the sidings of the barn. The three 
bedrooms upstairs have been made from 
what formerly was the haymow. 

The MacLaughlin household is thorough- 
ly organized and all members of the clan 
have specific chores to perform to help 
Mary and the maid, Helen, who has been 
with the family ten years. Don, naturally, 
handles the heavier chores — when in the 
mood — helps with the gardening, and does 
his share to keep the velvet-like green 
lawn in shape. The latter is a project in 
which all participate, and such strength 
in numbers has eliminated the need for 
purchasing a power-driven mower. 

"The youngsters generally are a willing 
group," Don points out with unrestrained 
pride, "and we don't encounter much 
griping at all. Doug, who is thirteen, is 
very clever with his hands and has turned 
out some real fine models of old-time 
automobiles. For a while I thought we 
might have a musician on our hands. He 
learned to play the guitar rather well and 
lately he's been plucking the bass fiddle, 
but I don't think he's too deeply interested 
in music. He has a scientific mind — likes 
to build radios, experiment with chemist- 
ry and study astronomy, and claims he 
wants to go to M.I.T. 

"Janet, of course, just lives for baseball. 
We toss the ball around together quite a 
bit and she's a real hot-shot — can scoop up 
a ground ball almost as well as some big 
leaguers. Britt's a very good worker. He's 
the baby of the outfit, but he does his 
chores very diligently and takes a lot 
of pride in his work." 

The MacLaughlins are confirmed Brook- 
lyn Dodger fans — without a dissenting 
vote — and this probably explains Janet's 
rabid enthusiasm for the game. Don tries 
to get the family out to Brooklyn to see 
their heroes play as often as possible, but 
when this isn't accomplished they have 
the ball game tuned in on the radio or 
television set. Very often the TV receiver 
is set up so that all the clan can watch 
the game while continuing with lunch or 
dinner. 

Don changes hobbies just about as often 
as a woman switches her hair-do. 

"I was a red-hot camera bug along about 
the time Doug was born, but you can see 
how my interest has cooled just by look- 
ing at the family album. We have scads 



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of pictures of Doug at all ages and in all 
outfits, but you'll hardly find one of young 
Britt. I was pretty interested in photog- 
raphy for a while, though, even had a 
couple of pictures published. Then I 
switched over to the guitar, just about the 
same time Doug was learning. I came to 
the conclusion that it's the easiest in- 
strument to play — badly. Why, even Doug 
showed me up. 

"Lately I've been fooling around with 
oil painting and I find that very relaxing. 
I've done a self-portrait that isn't too bad. 
It's a good likeness of me, but the brush- 
work is pretty awful. I suppose I'll get 
tired of this, too, after a while. When you 
come right down to it, I guess acting is 
the only craft I've ever tried to improve." 

Until Don settled down for his long stay 
in radio acting, the list of jobs he had 
previously held looked more like a voca- 
tional guide. He was a timekeeper in a 
dial telephone company, an illustrator, de- 
signer of miniature golf courses, a butcher, 
magazine writer, booking agent, high- 
school English teacher and a seaman on 
a freighter. 

He was born in Webster and named 
William Donald MacLaughlin, but be- 
cause of his father's poor health the fam- 
ily moved frequently, seeking favorable 
climates. As a result, Don went to gram- 
mar school in Springdale, Arkansas, three 
different high schools in Cedar Rapids, 
Webster, and Thornburg, Iowa, and four 
colleges — Iowa Wesleyan and Arizona, 
Northwestern and Iowa Universities, re- 
ceiving his A.B. at the latter. 

He majored in English and dramatics 
at college, and it was during his sopho- 
more year that he was nipped by the 
acting bug. He appeared in some campus 
plays and, while he was at the University 
of Arizona, he had his radio debut over 
Station KVOA, in Tucson. He's probably 
the only man in show business who got 
his start in the role of a horse. Don had 
a small part in a radio play but it was cut 
out during rehearsal. He was re-assigned 
to help out the sound effects man and, 
as a result, his initial introduction to the 
airwaves was as a neighing horse. 

After his college days, Don got the 
wanderlust and took off for the Orient to 
visit some missionary relatives in Singa- 
pore. He worked his way over as a sea- 
man on the proverbial "slow boat to China" 
and, after spending six months there, re- 
turned to find a job in New York. 

His first radio audition, for a post of 
staff announcer on a local station, con- 
sisted of reading a newscast. When it was 
over, Don learned that he had actually 
been on the air all the time. He got the job, 
too. "That blessed experience," he tells, 
"kept me from ever developing mike 
fright." 

He did a hitch as road manager with 
Little Jack Little's band after that and 
later joined a radio stock company at 
WHN in New York, along with Kenny 
Delmar — Fred Allen's one-time Senator 
Claghorn. 

Don met another young out-of-towner 
in New York just about this time. She was 
Mary Prugh, who had* ambitions of be- 
coming a newspaperwoman. They were 
married the following year. 

Those were difficult years during the 
Depression. In Don's first full year in 
radio, he earned the staggering sum of 
$22.50 — which he received for two ap- 
pearances. However, in 1938, he landed his 
first big break — a one-year contract in 
San Francisco to do a role in the serial, 
Dangerous Road. Since then, he's been 
one of the busiest performers on the 
network. 

And, for all the bends and turns and 
ruts, Don MacLaughlin is pretty happy 
about his "road of life." 



Our Wedding Miracle 

(Continued from page 56) 
standing in front of a full moon in a 
glamorous evening gown. 

I was stunned, a little groggy on my 
feet, but not out cold. We began talking 
and I found that her personality sparkled 
as much as her eyes. I learned she was 
a couple of years behind me in school, 
that her name was Eileen Levine, she 
was nineteen and lived in Brooklyn. 

After that I found myself anticipating 
our dancing class. I combed my hair un- 
necessarily, hummed on the way to the 
gym and held my breath till I caught 
sight of her. She seemed to like me, 
Easter vacation was coming up, so I 
asked for a date. She accepted. 

That Sunday we had a lovely time. We 
went to a students' hangout to eat, talk 
and listen to the music. And I went home 
miserable. Why? Well, I discovered — not 
really to my surprise — that Eileen had 
several other boy friends. Furthermore, 
she spoke well of them. I sensed it was 
going to be a long, arduous battle. And 
it was. 

Instantly, everyone knew I was in love, 
my brother and sister and my parents. 
I remember my best friend asked me to 
double-date with him the following Sat- 
urday. 

"She's busy," I said. 

"Which she?" he asked. "What're you 
talking about?" 

"Eileen can't go." 

"Leo, you're sick," he said, then he 
paused. "No, you're in love." 

There was no doubt of it. I waited on 
Eileen before, between and after classes. 
We went for long walks and talks. She 
seemed just as pleased with me as I was 
with her. But, when it came to dates, I 
had to get in line and wait my turn with 
the competition. It didn't seem fair. 

"It's a promise I made to my parents," 
she explained. "I promised that I wouldn't 
go steady until I graduated." 

And she had two years to go. 

"You just want to have your cake and 
eat it," I would say when I felt real nasty. 
Other times I tried to explain how bad 
it made me feel that she dated other 
men when I loved her. Of course, I tried 
to understand her parents' reasoning, but 
nothing is reasonable when you're in love. 

Our first kiss — now there was an oc- 
casion. It also marked my first major 
encounter with her parents. (Note: All 
this, while authentic, is told in the spirit 
of fun, for I think Eileen's parents are 
wonderful.) Eileen and I had returned 
from a school play. Eileen's father was 
sitting in the living room reading a news- 
paper and he went on reading. Eileen, 
who likes classical music, put on some 
records. Symphonies usually bore me, 
but listening was an excuse for staying, 
so I didn't object. Eileen's father didn't 
budge for thirty minutes then he crossed 
his legs, turned the page and went on 
reading. Never before did I realize that 
a newspaper contained so much. Then I 
borrowed the sport section, figuring there 
would be that much less for him to read. 
Two hours later he gave up. Defeated 
and saturated with world events, he 
wearily went to bed. 

"It's late," Eileen said. 

"Don't I know it," I said. "But I'm 
going." 

At the door I stopped and waited for her 
to come close. 

"May I kiss you?" 

She nodded and I remember yet that 
her kiss was worth the two-hour wait. 
It was a real television-type kiss. I 
floated home but I wasn't up in the 
clouds for long. Although we saw each 




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79 



other regularly, week after week 1 got the 
same answer, "Sorry, but I can't go 
steady." 

I know Eileen's folks liked me as a 
person, even though they weren't en- 
thusiastic about having a steady suitor 
around. I suppose parents have more 
time to be critical when they have only 
one child. My folks met Eileen and took 
to her immediately. 

"I wish you would settle down, Leon. 
You should have a steady girl friend now, 
like that nice Eileen," was my mother's 
comment. 

She didn't know how hard I was trying. 

Then summer came and both of us 
worked as counsellors at camps. The 
camps, however, were 130 miles apart. To 
complete my anguish, one of my competi- 
tors worked within walking distance of 
Eileen. That summer I got to see Eileen 
only three times and each time I came 
away feeling, today it's me but tomorrow 
who? Eileen was strictly observing her 
parents' rules. 

That fall we picked up our romance in 
the same irregularly -regular manner. I 
even managed to make myself a constant 
Thursday night dinner guest at her house, 
but it was still "sorry, can't go steady." 
By January — that was 1951 — I was beyond 
being reasonable. I wasn't a knight on a 
white charger. I felt more like a tender- 
foot on a bucking bronco. 

On a Saturday night in that January, I 
went to a square dance. Eileen couldn't 
go with me. Not only was she going out 
with someone else but he was a blind date, 
arranged by her mother. I decided then 
that the bubble would break or be broken. 

The next evening, I met her with some 
carefully prepared sarcastic remarks but 
she had the first word and it was music 
to my ears. 

"Leo, I was sick last night." 

"Something you ate?" 

"No, it was just dreadful being wit'-i 
someone else." 

It was the first time she had said it out 
loud. 

"Well, what are you going to do about 
it?" I asked. 

"We're going steady," she said. 

"How about your parents?" 

And she told me. When she got home 
the night before, she went to her parents' 
room. They were both sleeping, but she 
woke her mother. 

"I had a miserable time tonight," Eileen 
said. 

"Go to sleep," her mother said, closing 
her eyes. 

"I've decided," she said. "I'm not going 
out with any other boys but Leo." 

"We'll talk about it in the morning," 
her mother mumbled. 

I couldn't understand why her mother 
had so much trouble getting up then. She 
always managed to stay awake when I 
brought Eileen home from a date. Prob- 
ably my courtship had been as strenuous 
for her as for me. That proved to be so, 
for in the morning, she readily agreed 
that Eileen and I could go steady. 

I gave Eileen an engagement ring that 
April, the anniversary of the day we met. 
I'll never forget her eyes when she saw 
it — no painting could have done justice 
to the happiness on her face. 

We tried to set our wedding date and I 
found our problems weren't quite over. 
Eileen had more school to complete. My 
salary as a schoolteacher was just about 
what you expect a teacher's pay to be and 
you can imagine how far it goes. We 
couldn't have a small wedding for there 
were too many relatives and friends in 
1 New York. A big wedding would be very 
m expensive. And so the talk dragged on 
for months. 

"Wouldn't it be wonderful," Eileen said 
80 



one day, "if we could put all of the money 
to be spent on a wedding and honeymoon 
into getting a good start." 

"You have only one wedding and one 
honeymoon," I said. "It should be some- 
thing to remember." 

"Well, we might make it a major at- 
traction and sell tickets," she joked, and 
then paused and mumbled, "Bride and 
Groom." 

"What?" I asked. 

"The television program," she said. "You 
know, they marry you and give you a 
honeymoon." 

We had both seen the show, always 
jealous that it was someone else getting 
married. So we wrote for an application, 
filled it out and then waited. In the 
meantime, plans and discussions for the 
wedding were as mixed up as ever. Who 
would be invited? Where would it be? 
When? How large? Then one day there 
was a phone call. The wonderful, lovely 
Harriet Snelling, whom we'll always cher- 
ish, called us. We had been accepted as a 
couple to be married in April. 

"You haven't changed your mind, have 
you?" she asked. 

"I'm speechless, that's all." 

Everything was settled. The date: April 
3, 1952. The place: CBS-TV studios. The 
guests: Thirty-five — and everyone else 
could watch on TV. 

Several weeks before the wedding, we 
met Harriet Snelling, who was to be our 
principal guide. She explained that Bride 
and Groom would furnish everything: 
Token wedding rings, formal suits for the 
groom and best man, and a lovely gown 
for Eileen. The program would also take 
care of our honeymoon, transportation and 
five days at a resort hotel. 

"I've got seventeen days' leave from 
school," I said. "I'd like to go to Florida 
and then we could travel around a bit 
afterwards." 

"I'm not sure we can manage that," 
Harriet said. A week later she phoned 
and asked, "How about Palm Springs in 
California?" 

I just kind of babbled into the phone. 

"I guess that means yes?" Harriet 
laughed. 

"You bet." 

A few days before the wedding we went 



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to Manhattan again. Harriet took Eileen 
into a room. The door closed and I read 
the poster: "It may be love he's admit- 
ting or a gown she's a'fitting, so do not 
disturb." 

It was a gown, not me, and I observed 
the unwritten rule that the groom doesn't 
see his bride's dress until the wedding. 
And it was something worth waiting for. 
The dress was antique-ivory satin and 
lace with a full train, and the veil was 
fingertip. She carried a corsage of pink 
carnations pinned to a Bible. Eileen 
looked so lovely I could have cried. 

We got to the studio early enough to 
rehearse twice, just as we would have 
rehearsed in church. Phil Hanna, John 
Nelson and everyone else was so consid- 
erate. Of course, they gave me the usual 
kidding: "Not too late to change your 
mind, Leo." John Nelson had no idea of 
just how I had worked to get that far! 
But, believe me or not, I was the least 
nervous. I remember Eileen, waiting for 
the official ceremony with the Bible held 
against her. She was breathing so hard, 
she told me, that she was afraid the book 
would pop right out of her hands. And 
then the director's hand was raised . . . 
pointed at us . ■ ^id we were about to 
be married! 

Show me the man who remembers all 
the details of his wedding and I won't 
believe he's real. I don't remember. But 
everything went smoothly. Then the wed- 
ding was over and Eileen and I were 
kissing. That brought me back to life. 

But it was still just the start. After the 
reception, we were driven to the airport — 
with pounds of rice — and then literally 
and figuratively were in the clouds flying 
west to the fabulous Del Tahquitz Hotel 
in the resort town of celebrities, Palm 
Springs, California. We saw more movie 
stars there than you could find in any 
one column of Louella Parsons. 

We had read a brochure describing the 
hotel and everything lived up to our ex- 
pectations: The swimming pool, the din- 
ing room, our beautiful two-and-a-half- 
room suite that two bellboys led us to. 
Flowers in the room from the manager. 
We lived in luxury. We had snacks in 
the patio by the pool in our swim suits; 
we ate delicious meals. We took long 
walks at night and it couldn't have been 
more romantic, for even the street lights 
were hidden in palm trees. 

When our five days were up, we took 
the few hundred dollars I had brought 
along, hardly touched as yet, to finish the 
seventeen days of make-believe. I rented 
a car and we began a tour that, I suppose, 
is every Easterner's dream. 

We drove down the golden coast to 
Mexico and, on our way back, visited 
San Francisco and Los Angeles. We just 
didn't worry about anything, not even 
money. When we boarded the airplane in 
Burbank for our trip home via the North 
Star Caribbean Airline, I had only twenty- 
four cents in my pocket — just a penny 
short of what was required to tip the 
porter in New York. Even he didn't com- 
plain about being short-changed. 

We came back to an apartment we're 
subletting until our own is available in 
Little Neck, Long Island. We've already 
received additional gifts from the Bride 
and Groom program: Queen Bess silver 
and Carole Stupell china service for 
twelve people. Then we are getting some 
bedroom furniture and a Westinghouse 
television set. 

I can't say that the Bride and Groom 
show made me the happiest man in the 
world, for it was Eileen who did that. 
But Bride and Groom made our wedding 
and honeymoon the most eventful and 
happiest occasions in our lives. We hope 
our children will be as lucky. 



Julius La Rosa 

(Continued from page 53) 
American boy with a pleasant voice and 
make a star out of him. Julius, who's any- 
thing but conceited, blesses Godfrey sev- 
eral times a day, and pinches himself to 
make sure it's all true, in-between times. 
"I got six suits," he says wonderingly. "I 
used to get a new suit every year, for 
Easter. Now — six suits." 

The story of Julius La Rosa begins in 
Brooklyn. He was born there on January 
2, 1930. His father's name is Salvatore, 
his mother's name is Lucy, his sister's 
name is Sadie. Today, Sadie's married 
and has an eight-month-old daughter — 
but Julius fondly recalls that he and she 
nearly tore each other to pieces growing 
up. "Typical brother and sister," he says. 

Salvatore La Rosa was in the radio- 
servicing business, but little Julius was 
never as interested in radio tubes as in 
| what came out of them. He was practi- 
I cally the original Sinatra fan, went to hear 
Frankie at the Paramount, listened to his 
records incessantly while in high school. 
A real Sinatra fan. 

His father would talk sometimes about 
the future. His father was a realist. "The 
radio business isn't bad, Julie — " 

But Julie couldn't get with the idea. He 

had a sneaking suspicion about himself. 

Every time he watched Sinatra, he was 

putting himself up there on the stage and 

- liking the feeling. 

At Grover Cleveland High School, he 
passed for a fair student the first two years. 
"Then," he says, "I started noticing girls." 

The main girl he noticed was named 
Marion Kennedy, and he and she used to 
go to Eisenbarth's after school and drink 
sodas and talk about life. 

Around about this time, Julius' friend, 
Joe Sangiorgio, joined the High School 
Senior Chorus. Julius used to notice Joe 
was getting time off from classes for re- 
hearsals. 

"Some racket," Julius said. 

"Why don't you join?" Joe said. 

And there was Julius, wondering why 
he hadn't thought of that himself. He 
joined, and eventually made the All-City 
chorus of 300 voices. He went in as a 
second tenor, and came out as a first bass. 

Julius sang with dance bands at school, 
and also entered several amateur con- 
tests. "I lost," he says sweetly. 

Eventually he came out of high school, 
a bewildered young man. His father had 
a store by now and Julius tried working 
in it, but it wasn't any good. 

He went to work in an office. It was a 
pneumatic tool company, and he was 
what they call a "ditto boy." You stood 
at a machine like a mimeograph, and you 
pressed copies of invoices, smack, smack, 
smack, all day long, until you felt like 
your arm was falling off. Thirty -five a 
week was the pay. Two months of ditto- 
ing, and Julius decided to quit. He went 
back to tell the office manager — secretly 
known as Fatty — the news. Fatty was 
enraged. "You can't quit," he said, in a 
switch on the old gag. "You're fired." 

Julius went home and hung around. 
The family was very tolerant, but they 
wanted him to make up his mind. "Would 
you like to go to college?" his mother 
said. 

"No." 

"Get a job then." 

"But there's nothing I like doing except 
singing." 

Finally, Julius decided the Navy might 
be for him. The Paramount Theatre didn't 
seem to be hiring unknown Brooklyn boys 
as crooners, and Salvatore La Rosa had 
always talked about what a good life the 




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81 



Navy was. (He served during World War 
II.) "I wish I could go back," Salvatore 
would say occasionally, to tease his wife. 
"I've been to all the islands — Staten Island, 
Rhode Island — " 

The islands business is an old family 
gag. Actually, Salvatore has never been 
overseas. He was due to sail, when he 
broke his leg on Treasure Island (off 
San Francisco) and got left behind. 

"Japs I wasn't afraid of," he often 
boasts to his children. "It's just I wouldn't 
have liked to pick up any of those tropi- 
cal bugs." 

His children privately think that's a lot 
of baloney, but they listen indulgently. 

Salvatore La Rosa's induction into the 
Navy had imposed a hardship on his wife. 
The kids were thirteen and fifteen (Sadie's 
the older one) and still in school. "So," 
Julius says, "Mama went to work as an 
operator on women's coats." 

Ironically, two weeks after the Navy 
took Salvatore, the law was changed, so 
that men in his circumstances wouldn't 
have to go. 

Anyhow, Julius decided he'd try the 
Navy, too. At this point, it was November 
of 1947, and since he wasn't eighteen, he 
needed the signature of a parent. His 
mother wouldn't sign. His father would. 
"If nothing else, it'll make a man of you." 

Our "man" got to boot camp in Great 
Lakes, Illinois, homesick and miserable. 
It was his first time away from the family, 
and he even missed Sadie and the battles. 

From Great Lakes, he went into the 
air branch of the Navy — "I decided to 
make Dad happy and learn electronics" 
— and attended a school in Memphis. 
After Memphis, he was transferred to an 
attack squadron on the East Coast as an 
air crewman (a radar operator) , which 
he claims was his biggest thrill in the 
world. Later, he was transferred again, 
this time to the USS Wright (an aircraft 
carrier) as a member of the ship's com- 
pany. By then he was doing aviation 
radio mechanics. This was in June, 1949. 

Julius hadn't stopped singing, though. 
"No matter where you go in the Navy," 
he says, "there's always somebody play- 
ing a piano or guitar — there's always 
someone who can accompany you." 

Julius had a short leave from the 
Wright, and the Korean war broke out 
right in the middle of it. A telegram 
arrived at the La Rosa house. "Get back," 
it said in essence. All the La Rosas were 
alarmed. "They had me shot, killed, 
buried," he says. And then, grinning, "I 
did, too." 



Actually, the Wright was just speeding 
up its orders so it could go down to Pen- 
sacola and relieve another carrier. The 
duty of the Wright's crew, once it got to 
Pensacola, was to train naval cadets. 

The ship had been there a couple of 
months when the crew got the news that 
Arthur Godfrey was coming down to be 
given his Navy wings. (Godfrey's been 
a member of the reserve for years, and is 
a wonderful flier.) 

Two and two made four. Julius was 
known around Pensacola as "the kid from 
the Wright who sings." His pal, Gene 
Montalbano, an ex-neighbor from Brook- 
lyn, also on the Wright, said, "Wouldn't 
it be terrific if Godfrey could hear Julius 
sing?" And a lot of other people were 
thinking the same thing. 

It was just like in the movies. Julius' 
shipmates wrote and asked Godfrey if 
he'd listen to Julius sing at the enlisted 
men's club, and Godfrey wrote back, 
"Yes." Nobody could believe it. 

On September 14, 1950, at about eight 
o'clock, after Godfrey'd played and en- 
tertained the boys, he suddenly said, 
"Okay, where's this kid, La Rosa, I've 
been hearing about?" 

The next thing Julius knew, he was on 
leave in New York, and guest-starring 
on the Godfrey radio show. Godfrey 
offered him a suite of rooms at the Hotel 
Lexington, but Julius said thanks, he'd 
go home to Brooklyn. 

Right after this, he found out he was 
being transferred to the U.S. Navy Band 
in Washington, D.C. This move, he rever- 
ently refers to as "the greatest." 

Before he left New York, Godfrey said, 
"When you get discharged, come see me." 

With these words ringing in his ears, 
Julius went off to the Navy Band. At 
first, the other musicians terrified him — 
"They were all virtuosos, and I'm a pop 
vocalist" — but he ended up thinking they 
were the most wonderful gang in the 
world. 

He spent a year in the Band, touring 
the southeastern United States and -lov- 
ing every minute of it. 

The time in Washington, he preferred to 
the time away from it, however. This was 
for a very simple reason. He fell in love. 
In Washington, he met "the most wonder- 
ful girl in the world." 

It happened one night, when a couple 
of friends took him to a night club, and 
asked him to get up and sing a couple of 
songs. He did. After he was finished, 
this girl — her name was Bobbie — came 
over. "I'd like to tell you that you sing 



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82 



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very nicely," she said. Something like 
that, very ordinary. 

He sang "Embraceable You" right at 
her. Bobbie had a date, and he — the date 
— was getting mad. 

"But I had taken two looks at her," 
Julius says and, thus emboldened, he' 
went over to Bobbie's table and thanked 
her. 

"I never did anything like that in my 
life," he reflects now. "Go to a strange 
girl's table, and ask for her phone num- 
ber." 

He asked, she gave it to him, and they 
started going out together, Julius and his 
5' 4" blonde. "She was beautiful," he'says, 
"inside, outside, sideways." 

He wrote to his folks, but they thought 
it was just another crush. It wasn't. It 
was serious. "I wanted to marry her," he 
says today. "I wish I had." 

Bobbie broke things up. She thought 
marriage wouldn't be good for Julius' 
career, and they argued the thing back 
and forth, and she finally married an en- 
sign she'd known before — an Academy 
man. 

Julius can be very honest about it. 
"She was going out with Tom before she 
met me," he says. "All I did was make 
things tough for her, present a problem. 
She's happy and expecting a child. I 
keep in touch with them. Her husband 
goes to school in Pensacola (he's a Naval 
air cadet). Pensacola . . . talk about 
irony. . . ." 

Julius was supposed to be discharged 
in 1950, but because of the Korean war 
he was "frozen" for a year. 

He got out on a Friday — November 9, 
1951. On November 12, the following 
Monday, he was in Arthur Godfrey's 
office. 

"I'm discharged," he told the secretary. 

"He'll call you in a couple of days," the 
secretary said. 

There wasn't any point in hanging 
around. Julius went home to Brooklyn, 
and sweated out the phone call. 

Three days later, it came. On November 
19, he went up and signed his contract, 
and started as a member of the Little 
Godfreys. 

"I have never," he says, "been so happy 
in all my life." 

He means it, too. People who know him 
from one of the Godfrey programs ask 
when he'll be on other shows or when 
he'll do some recordings. To all of them, 
he says only, "That's up to Mr. Godfrey. 
He knows when I'll be ready." 

He's got implicit faith in Godfrey, and 
believes he's being trained the right way 
— slowly. "I'm still a gawky guy," he 
says. "There's nothing professional about 
me." 

You may not agree that there's nothing 
professional about Julius, but you've got 
to agree that there's nothing phony. The 
big head he hasn't got, or the star com- 
plex. He's a simple — in the best sense of 
the word — person, and a straightforward 
one. 

Last Christmas, for instance, he felt 
he had a problem. He was worried about 
Godfrey. "What in good grief," he said, 
"can a guy like me give a guy like that 
who's got everything?" 

Then he solved his own problem in his 
own way. He went into Godfrey's office, 
stretched his hand across Godfrey's desk 
and said, with his heart in his eyes, "I 
want to wish you a Merry Christmas." 

Godfrey stood up. "Thank you, Julius," 
he said. "This is the nicest thing you could 
have done." 

"He's the greatest," Julius will tell you 
about Godfrey. And you have a sneaking 
suspicion that Godfrey might return the 
compliment if anybody should happen to 
ask him. 



Johnnie Ray 

(Continued from page 43) 
order to be tall enough for a good peek. 
He was a fat, pink baby. Cute. But I was 
a little disappointed because he didn't get 
up and do anything. He just stayed there 
and slept. 

"If I could have looked ahead a few 
years, I'd have been glad to let him lie 
there quietly for, even as a small child, 
John seemed never to have any fear and 
he was always on the go. At the age of 
four, he'd climb around the rafters in 
the barn where the least misstep . . . and 
no more Johnnie! He was nine, I think, 
when he swam the Willamette and nearly 
gave me and my parents heart failure. 
He was a fine swimmer, and is now, but 
the Willamette from bank to bank is a 
long way. And there was the day we 
nearly lost him in the flood waters of a 
swollen creek. Dad dived in, swam out 
to him, managed to get Johnnie back to 
shore But it was a nightmare. 

"John was a very lovable child and 
people have responded to his personality 
all his life. He has warmth and com- 
munication and he extends it to animals, 
too. At the farm and later, when we lived 
in town, he used to bring home animals 
of all descriptions; mangy cats, scroungy 
dogs that no one else would have around. 
John dragged them home, petted them, 
fed them, loved them. There never was 
such a boy for animals. As soon as he can 
get around to it, he's going to buy a 
farm where, he says, T can have a million 
of 'em!' " 

As small children on the farm, Elma 
and John, inseparable, did all the normal 
things. They climbed trees, picked spring 
flowers, built great castles out of prune 
crates. "One of the most beautiful and 
peaceful memories we share," John said, 
"is sitting squarely in the middle of the 
road through the apple orchard, our bare 
feet in the tangled grass, the sun warm 
on our backs, just talking, just dreaming. 
A great treat, too, was to ride on the 
back of the tractor with Dad, coming home 
the color of earth and sun." 

On the farm it was by no means all play 
and no work for the two children. They 
had their chores, same as all the kids on 
the neighboring farms. 

"I used to milk the cows, feed, the 
chickens," Johnnie said, "and, in season, 
pick apples and walnuts, which were our 
main crops. During summer vacations, 
Elma and I earned money by picking 
cherries, prunes, berries for other farm- 
ers. Also, hops — and to this day, picking 
hops remains," Johnnie wrinkled his nose, 
"a thorn in my memory. It was the one 
thing my folks made me do that I didn't 
want to do, and I'm afraid I couldn't take 
it. I'd crawl into a sack and play possum. 
I'd play sick. I'd get lost. 

"In school, too, I was a typical Huckle- 
berry Finn. Any excuse I could dream up 
for ditching school, I used. I bet I had 
more 'earaches' and 'sore throats' than all 
the boys in the state of Oregon put to- 
gether. They were remarkable ailments, 
too. They would never last past 9:30 A.M. 
School bored me. I couldn't and wouldn't 
understand it. I'd look out at the trees 
and fields and couldn't see the sense in 
being kept in a schoolroom. Shut in. Any- 
thing I hate, it's to be shut in." 

In spite of his avowed claustrophobia in 
the classroom, school had its compensation 
for reluctant scholar Ray. He was in de- 
mand as a singer. "I sang at the meetings 
of the Girls' Athletic Association. They'd 
have assembly and I'd go in and sing for 
all those girls!" 

And in the seventh grade, when he was 
twelve, Johnnie fell in love. Unfortunate- 



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83 



ly, all he remembers of his first crush is 
only that her name was Jane Crieder, 
and that he wrote for her one of his first 
songs. The title was "My Heart Beats for 
You" and the first lines went, he thinks, 
something like this: "When I look at you, 
I thrill through and through, what else, 
what else can I do?" Jane, as the object 
of Johnnie's heart, was replaced in the 
eighth grade by Rosalie Johnson and, 
when he was fifteen and in his sophomore 
year, one Orlanda Ratslaff upped Johnnie's 
heartbeats. 

"Since Orlanda Ratslaff," Johnnie 
laughed, "nothing. Just dates, that's all. 
Never a girl I was in love with until 
Marilyn Morrison came along. And then it 
was Marilyn and no more dates, for 
Marilyn is, I can truthfully say, my first 
and my only true love." 

Of the songs, however, there have been 
many more, some 155 in all. Inspiration was 
not confined to the lady love of the moment, 
for songs come to Johnnie in many ways — 
traveling on a bus in California one night 
(he was too broke to travel any other 
way), a young girl seated next to him 
asked, "What do you do?" 

Johnnie looked out at the Sierra Madres 
bathed in moonlight. "I write songs," he 
said. The song he wrote that night was 
"Mountains in the Moonlight." Again it 
may be a face glimpsed in a crowd, a 
painting, something said to him — a song 
is born and the lyrics and music take 
shape. 

As a youngster, Johnnie, AWOL from 
regular school, never had to be "made" to 
go to Sunday school. 

"I am not fanatically religious," Johnnie 
said. "I am deeply religious. I was brought 
up that way. Yet nobody can 'teach' you 
God. Or find Him for you. You've got to 
find Him for yourself. I did. Often, after 
Sunday school, I would go for long walks 
by myself. I liked to take long walks in 
order to think, perhaps just to dream. 
And I used to have little private conver- 
sations with God. I still have them, 
whether on buses, in trains, or in the 
wings of the theatres I play. That is 
simply the kind of religion I have." 

In spite of the fact that Johnnie is the 
demonstrative type, as a child he was 
something of a lone wolf. He liked games, 
but with most of the boys he knew he had 
little in common. With one exception — 
Bill Blackley. 

"No one, except Marilyn, the woman 
to whom I've opened my whole heart, has 
ever before heard me talk about Bill 
Blackley, a boy I grew up with, the best 
buddy a guy ever had. I just idolized that 
boy, who was two years older than I — old 



enough for me to look up to as a big 
brother. I did look up to him, too. 

"From the time I was six and he was 
eight, Bill and I were pals. We used to 
roller skate in Dallas. Love roller skating. 
Used to go to the movies. Sometimes 
we'd go camping out, too. Just hunt and 
talk. Bill was a good sport. He'd never 
shoot a deer when it was standing still. 
Or a rabbit, either. 'Every living thing,' 
he'd say, 'must have a chance.' Thanks to 
Bill, I learned sportsmanship. The clean 
kind. 

"He used to apply this principle to 
humans, too. And for that I got slapped 
around a bit before I learned. One day, 
as we were coming out of school, the guy 
on Safety Patrol told me not to cross the 
street just yet. I got very snooty with him. 
I told him off. Bill was about six feet 
behind me. Next thing I knew, I felt his 
hand on my arm, spinning me around, 
hard. He slapped me down! 'If I ever 
catch you acting like this again,' he said, 
'I'll fix you. That guy's doing his job.' 

"I liked him all the better for it. I knew 
I was wrong, anyway. That's something 
you can't kid yourself about — when you're 
wrong, you know it! 

"Once Bill came to my defense. It was 
a hot Saturday afternoon and all the kids 
were in the Park, fooling around, swim- 
ming in the creek. I was talking, I re- 
member, to Orlanda Ratslaff, my crush 
that summer — oh, it was a wild thing! — 
when a guy named Sumner and another 
one named Hitt decided to beat me up. 
I was fourteen or fifteen at the time. They 
were older and bigger boys and they 
began to knock the dickens out of me. 
Sumner shoved my front tooth right 
through my lip. I still have the scar. He 
knocked my hearing aid off. My ear 
started bleeding. Then Bill moved in and 
you never saw two fellows get what they 
had coming to them so fast — they must 
have scars to this day, as I have. 

"Bill took me to the crick, washed off 
my ear, my lip. If people are on your side, 
I remember thinking, they love you, they'll 
protect you. It's the kind of thing you 
never forget. I've never forgotten be- 
cause, through Bill, I learned to love 
people outside of my own family, which 
has a lot to do with the fact that I'm the 
happiest guy in life. People love me and 
I love people — and now, I'm in love. 

"The last time I saw Bill was in 1942, 
just before we left Dallas. He was killed 
in World War II— Lieutenant Bill Black- 
ley." There was a moment's pause, then 
Johnnie said: 

"Much as I love my family, much as 
they mean to me, Bill was the greatest 



R 

M 

84 




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influence on my life. Basically, I learned 
my philosophy, my way around from him. 
Because I knew my success would make 
him happy, I've worked for him and for 
the memory of him. 'John, some day 
I'm going to be proud of you,' that's what 
he'd say. That, I hope, is what he is say- 
ing now. 

"When I love somebody very much, 
like my family, like Marilyn, like Bill, 
the mere thought of something happen- 
ing to them breaks me all up. If anything 
should happen, for instance, to my wife. 
I often think, I couldn't live! Yet, I would 
live. Bill taught me that, too. For I found 
out at last in the realization that Bill, a 
clean kid with no bad habits, went right 
back to God, where he came from. This 
being so, I couldn't wish to have him back 
with me." 

Yes, packed into Johnnie's young life 
is sorrow, understanding, tragedy, love. 
Johnnie was twelve when he lost his 
hearing. 

"Some Boy Scouts were tossing me up 
in a blanket," he said. "The blanket tore 
and I fell. The blow collapsed the Eu- 
stachian tubes. It took six months for me 
to realize I was deaf, then the doctors 
traced the cause of it. Nothing, so far as 
we know now, can be done about it, but 
it is nothing to sorrow about, anyway." 

The accident which robbed Johnnie of 
his hearing didn't seem to bother him, as 
a child, any more than it does now. 

"It made the rest of the family heart- 
sick," Elma said, "but John only turned 
the radio up louder! I don't think he 
realized that he couldn't hear until the 
folks bought him his first hearing aid. 
The night he got it, it rained and he was 
in bed. I remember him calling out to us. 
sounding very thrilled, T can hear the 
rain on the roof!' This simple sentence, 
which seemed to come out almost grate- 
fully, brought tears to all our eyes, but 
we never let John know. He wasn't 
treated as though he were handicapped, 
and I don't believe he ever felt labeled 
as such. The kids at school were very 
interested in the hearing aid and he'd let 
them try it out. 

"Shortly after he got his hearing aid, 
Johnnie discovered it had its advantages. 
I had a date. We were just home from the 
movie and I had poured us a bottle of pop. 
My date and I sat down to talk, when we 
heard a strange, ringing sound which we 
thought, at first, was the radio misbehav- 
ing. But the radio was off and, anyway, 
the strange sound seemed to come from 
behind an open door. Even now, after 
eleven years, I laugh and laugh when I 
remember the expression on John's face 
when we peeked behind the door and 
found him eavesdropping on our conver- 
sation, with the hearing aid turned up! 

"I am sure that John never felt his 
lack of hearing put him apart from others. 
And he was grimly determined it would 
not make any difference in his already 
well-formed ambitions. He knew he was 
going to be a star some day. He's always 
had great trust in God and much faith in 
the power of prayer. For a good many 
years, John struggled hard for recognition 
and a bare existence in the West. But 
that is the way of success and never has 
his faith faltered. That is the way my 
parents brought him up and it is a very 
sincere Johnnie Ray tribute. Is it so 
wrong for Johnnie to give a lot of credit, 
and openly, to the Supreme Being? John- 
nie Ray is not so egotistical, you may be 
sure, as to think that he did it alone." 

(Next month the concluding half of 
Johnnie's life story will be published in 
Radio-TV Mirror. In it Johnnie tells the 
inside story of his love and marriage to 
Marilyn Morrison and the behind-the- 
scenes episodes which led to his success.) 



Heartbreak Child 



(Continued from page 63) 
him. Looking back over his young life, I 
remembered the time when I opened my 
apartment door in New York to find his 
forlorn little figure, tense with fear and 
antagonism, waiting anxiously to see if he 
could find shelter with me. Hearing and 
seeing what he wasn't supposed to, and not 
comprehending what he did hear and see, 
were at the root of the fear-ridden trip he 
had just made to me from Barrowsville. 
Beanie had a fear, common to many 
children — the fear of being an unwanted 
child whose mother consequently doesn't 
love him. The basis for this fear was very 
real in Beanie's mind, for he had heard 
Charlie, his father, and Meg, his mother, 
quarreling about the way he was being 
brought up. Charlie was blaming Beanie's 
faults on Meg, forgetting in the heat of 
anger that, as Beanie's father, he was as 
responsible as Meg. Meg, lashing back 
at Charlie in unbridled emotion, had 
screamed that she had never wanted a 
child anyway. 

In the white heat of temper Meg had, 
with her own lips, voiced the fears which 
Beanie secretly harbored. No wonder he 
had taken his mother at her word (words 
which she really didn't mean) and had 
come running to me for comfort! 

While Meg was on her way to get 
Beanie. I tried to make Beanie see that 
he was not the cause of the discord be- 
tween his parents. I discovered that he 
heard them arguing frequently, often 
mentioning his name, and he had begun 
to believe he must be doing something 
very wrong which made them both un- 
happy and angry. 

Then, hard on the heels of this experi- 
ence, Beanie found himself the object of 
scorn both at home and at the school, 
through no fault of his own. Meg be- 
came the defendant in a murder trial 
because of an indiscreet meeting with 
attractive Miles Pardee when Charlie was 
away. Meg had witnessed the killing of 
Pardee. Because she was the last person 
to see him alive she was accused, tried 
and convicted on circumstantial evidence. 
The fact of her complete exoneration and 
legal acquittal later could not erase alto- 
gether the wounds of the whole tragedy — 
the scars of which Beanie will probably 
always carry on his soul. 

In my ignorance and innocence I 
thought the best place for Beanie would 
be with my father and mother. What I 
didn't know, and probably wouldn't have 
admitted it I had thought about it, was 
that my father does not approve of Meg. 
To Dad, a human being is either all good 
or wholly bad and he could only see bad 
in his daughter Meg. To Beanie, he trans- 
ferred all his pent-up anger at the situ- 
ation Meg now found herself in. It was 
the same situation I had seen so many 
times in so many homes where the child 
is left defenseless because one of the par- 
ents takes out anger, really felt toward 
the partner, on the child. 

At school, indignities were heaped upon 
a child who already, at home, had almost 
more than any little human should be 
asked to take. The other children, hear- 
ing scraps of conversations about the sen- 
sational Dales through their parents, be- 
gan to taunt Beanie, ridicule him. Beanie 
struck back the only way he knew — with 
his fists. With all the strength of an 
eight-year-old, Beanie fought the bullies 
who had taunted him the most. He had 
to defend his mother for, in attacking her, 
they were also attacking him. 

At this point, what Beanie needed from 
his grandfather was understanding. What 
he got was punishment for having torn 



his clothes and dirtied his face. Dad in 
his stern and righteous code of ethics had 
no patience, no tolerance for wrong-doing 
and he felt it was right for his grandson 
to bear the burden of Meg's mistakes 
and, if bearing up under his classmates' 
taunts was part of that burden, then so 
be it. 

All of this, coming to a head, was what 
was speeding me on my way from New 
York to Barrowsville. The school princi- 
pal had thought it might be a good thing 
to remove Beanie from the school for his 
own sake. Dad was willing for him to 
leave, too. I think everyone concerned 
felt that if Beanie were put in another 
school, far, far away from the scandal of 
the past few months, he would automati- 
cally be all right. In my heart of hearts, I 
could not feel this was so. To me, one of 
life's principles is that, if you fight through 
and win, you will be a better person for 
having stood your ground. 

When I arrived at Dad's home and saw 
the drawn, haunted look upon Beanie's 
face, I almost weakened. For a few min- 
utes I felt the cruelty foisted upon Beanie 
was something he should not be asked to 
take, but then I talked to him. Beanie 
told me that, until this time, this school 
had been the one place where he had 
been happy, and that among the children 
he had some friends whom he liked a lot. 
Knowing this, I explained how I felt about 
his standing his ground and fighting it 
out, not necessarily with his fists, but with 
his whole spirit. Dad and the principal at 
last agreed to try, for Beanie's sake, once 
more. 

I almost regretted interfering within a 
week One of the boys taunted Beanie 
by drawing a picture on the ground with 
his pocket knife, showing a woman shoot- 
ing a man. Beanie knew the boy meant 
his mother and Miles Pardee. With cool- 
ness which would have done justice to an 
older man, Beanie took the knife from 
the boy and threw it away. That night 
the boy and his father came to my dad 
and said Beanie had tried to kill the boy 
by threatening him with the knife. It 
was at this point, I was proven right. For 
once Dcd stood firmly on Beanie's side. 
Unceremoniously, he put the boy and his 
father out of the house. 

In that moment, Dad and Beanie had 
learned their first lesson in living to- 
gether. My father had learned simply to 
trust Beanie. Beanie had learned that, in- 
stead of running away as he had once 
run to me in New York, he had the power 
within him to stand up for what is right 
and solve his problem. 

I wish I could say that Beanie's diffi- 
culties were over. But isn't the process 
of growing up actually the meeting of 
difficulties and overcoming them in ever 
more efficient ways? We Dales seem 
born to get ourselves out of one dilemma 
and into another — especially my sister 
Meg, who in this case also happens to be 
Beanie's mother. I only know that Beanie 
will never lack for love and understand- 
ing and it will come from his mother 
ultimately. Every child needs at least 
one person who stands solid as a rock to 
protect him and give him the unwavering 
love and comfort he must have. It should 
be his mother, and eventually Beanie 
will find that it will be. 

In the meantime, I shall do everything 
in my power to establish a fine relation- 
ship between Beanie and Meg. It's a job 
I'm proud to accept. I have always known 
that Beanie is not a problem child — only 
a child with a problem — which is always 
a heartbreak child. 



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85 



Paul Dixon — Home Town Boy 



(Continued jrom page 49) 
home for the weekend?" 

For Marge, the lure of a visit to her 
family's farm topped anything the city 
had to offer. She broke the date and, by 
the time they returned to Des Moines, they 
had agreed to go steady. 

Paul says he ate hamburgers for six 
months to buy her the pin-point diamond 
Marge has never permitted him to replace 
with a more sizeable stone, then displays 
the gold-mounted intaglio he wears. "You 
could have knocked me over with a feather 
when I discovered Marge had been saving 
just as hard as I had. I never expected her 
to give me an engagement ring, too." 

The fifty-fifty partnership which began 
with the exchange of rings continued after 
their marriage. When Paul set his sights 
on Chicago, Marge said, "What have we 
got to lose?" They loaded all their posses- 
sions into a rickety car and took off. 

Paul was right in saying Chicago held 
opportunity. Network soap operas carried 
sizeable fees but Paul couldn't catch even 
a bubble. Paying room rent and buying 
meals took cash, not hopes. Marge went 
to work in Marshall Field's basement, 
while Paul made audition after audition. 

Program directors were unimpressed. His 
style wasn't right. They didn't like his 
voice. They had a man already in mind. 

Brad Eidman, then manager of the Dro- 
vers' Journal thousand-watt sundowner, 
was the first to give him a chance on the 
air. Says Eidman, "He showed up for a 
competitive audition. In a group of ten, 
Paul was easily the winner. He didn't give 
the call letters as though he were making 
a Presidential pronouncement. His voice 
was fresh. He talked to a farm audience, 
not down to them." 

Hired at a scale which was far from 
magnificent, he got a new man's 6: 00 A.M. 
shift of market reports, station breaks, pro- 
gram introductions. It was not the policy 
of WAAF to build stars and, besides, Bob 
Hawk and Eddie Case were then on staff 
and overshadowed all other announcers. 
Dixon plodded along. 

For ambitious Paul, such plodding was 
like walking through quicksand. The 
strain told on both Dixons. Paul acquired 
so severe a sinus condition that the Army 
rejected him as asthmatic; Marge, although 
they wanted a baby, never became preg- 
nant. Frustration piled on frustration. 

Whether network directors realized it or 
not, public taste was changing. People 
were tired of hearing stylized voices utter 
every word with the same hollow formal- 
ity. When Paul finally talked Eidman into 
letting him disc-jockey a morning show, 
it caught on. 

When he was able to report to Marge, 
"I got a fan letter!" the two celebrated. 
Says Paul, "We really lived it up. We 
walked over to Helsing's vaudeville lounge 
and spent a couple of bucks and a couple 
of hours watching a trio which panto- 
mimed records." 

What Mr. Dixon himself was doing about 
records began to attract notice. Mail in- 
creased, and song pluggers told him he 
definitely influenced sales. 

That gave Paul an idea. To Marge he 
confided, "If I could only get a lot of my 
listeners together in one place, it would 
show people what I can do. Do you sup- 
pose I dare rent a ballroom and stage a 
Paul Dixon Night?" 

Paul Dixon Night, in the opinion of most 
people, was a huge success. Crowds packed 
in, celebrities turned up, yet — when the 
m Dixons got home, Paul seemed deflated. 

After wifely coaxing, he admitted what 
was wrong. "Not a single radio editor 
86 



showed." Marge gave him a puzzled look. 

Paul told her then. His real objective 
had been to get newspaper notice. "I just 
have to make some dent in the big stations. 
I've got to get on network. The way things 
are going, we'd have been better off stay- 
ing in Iowa. At least we would have lived 
better." 

Marge glanced around the tiny apart- 
ment. Some of the furniture had come 
with the place. The rest they had shopped 
for in the bargain stores on South Halstead. 
They had made it a home, and they weren't 
asking for an estate in Winnetka, but there 
was no denying that the grass, trees and 
open spaces they both missed so acutely 
were expensive luxuries in Chicago. 

But this was no time to remind Paul of 
it. Arm around his shoulders, she assured 
him, "Some day we'll have it. We'll have 
a house with a back yard and everything — 
and, when we do, don't let me hear you 
gripe about cutting the grass." 

A large local advertiser got interested 
in buying his WAAF program. The ad- 
vertiser also had a total cf eight shows on 
Chicago stations and a habit of assigning 
a personal announcer to all of them. Some 
men who had held the assignment went on 
to fabulous jobs. But negotiations were 
hot one week, cold the next. 

In the midst of this war of nerves, Paul 
took an early news show one morning, 
when the regular newsman failed to show 
up, and as a result got a telephone call. 
Reporting it to Marge, he said, "Some jerk 
— from Cincinnati, I guess — says he wants 
me to come down there to do news." 

Marge raised her eyebrows. "Well?" 

"I told him," said Paul, "that at WAAF 
they consider me the world's worst news- 
caster." Then his real reason welled up. 
"Besides, it's the sticks. Get lost in Cin- 
cinnati and I'll never get a crack at the 
net." 

A chance show, an unimpressive phone 
call, a "jerk from Cincinnati" — that was 
Paul's and Marge's first knowledge of the 
man who was to change their lives. 

By the next evening, the man had a 
name. Paul told her, "I'll be darned if that 
guy didn't show up and take me to lunch. 
He's Morton Watters, he's manager at 
WCPO, and I couldn't help liking him." 

Dynamic, hard-driving Watters liked 
Paul even better in person than he had on 
the air. He liked his ambition, his enthusi- 
asm, the way his voice stayed on a person- 
to-person basis, and he also liked the 
young man's wholesome good looks. For 
Watters — even in 1944, when television was 
hobbled — had plans and Paul fit into them. 
He made an offer and, when Paul rejected 
it, invited him to come down to Cincinnati 
to have a look, at least. 

Paul, on arrival, found a little station, 
far from "first" and not even "second" in 
rating. But he also found a radio-conscious 
town where competition between stations 
was as stimulating as a shot of adrenalin. 
Everyone was in there pitching. And 
WCPO, because it measured assets more 
in terms of Watters' ingenuity than in 
charts of field coverage, was pitching 
hardest of all. 

He also found a city of homes and trees 
and hills, a river town old in tradition, 
rich in legend, metropolitan, suave, sophis- 
ticated. If this was "the sticks," it was the 
sticks with glamour. 

Paul admitted he liked it, but he con- 
tinued to say "No." Watters talked some 
more and, before he left, it turned to 
"Maybe." 

Watters sensed his advantage and 
pressed it. He gave the long-rejected Paul 
the thrill of being wanted, and made an 
offer he could not afford to turn down. 



But, in the end, the balance was turned 
not by money alone but because of Marge. 

No one knew better than Paul that 
Marge, for all her willingness to go to 
work to help earn the living, was at heart 
a home girl. Alone he might continue to 
wait for the breaks, but the gamble wasn't 
fair to Marge. He weighed his dream of 
fame against the kind of home he would 
be able to afford in Cincinnati, and the 
home won. 

Yet, when they had shipped their furni- 
ture and started down the road, Paul found 
every mile of the windswept road doubled 
by doubt. Ironically, two days before he 
was due to leave, the big advertiser had 
decided he wanted Dixon. Only Paul's 
sense of honor held him to his agreement 
with Watters. 

Yet he couldn't help wondering. For all 
his endeavor to do so, was he being fair to 
Marge? Was he doing the right thing? 

Noticing his tension, Marge broke it by 
saying, "They're going to love you in Cin- 
cinnati." 

It was a gag old as show business, but 
she made it sound like a promise. 

The promise, however, took time to come 
true. Paul pitched and Watters promoted, 
but Cincinnati remained indifferent until 
the day a disaster brought remote crews 
from many stations rushing to the scene 
where a building had collapsed. 

A man was trapped in the debris. Other 
announcers reported it with voice-of-doom 
heroics. Paul, still feeling he was the 
world's worst newscaster, crawled into the 
tunnel cleared by rescue workers and 
talked to the man. He was quiet, consid- 
erate, human. It turned out to be a vital, 
vivid reporting which people still talk 
about, but Paul wasn't trying to be dra- 
matic. "I didn't want Marge to worry," he 
recalls. 

After that, Cincinnati darned well knew 
Dixon was in town, and Watters, seizing 
the opportunity, turned him into a local 
ever-broadcasting Godfrey. 

Watters says, "Trying to figure things 
out in terms of what people wanted to 
hear, I decided Paul was the kind of per- 
son listeners would like to have come visit 
them a couple hours, so we tried it." 

He applied the same formula to televi- 
sion, when their station opened. He as- 
signed a time spot and told Paul to fill it 
Just as he was entering the studio to talk 
about records, Mort had another hunch 
Dottie Mack, the pretty brunette model 
who had come to the station as reception- 
ist, was standing near. "Go on in with 
him, Dottie," Watters directed. 

Paul and Dottie worked well together, 
and the third member of the team also 
joined up by accident. Wanda Lewis, the 
artist who painted sets, was walking 
through the studio when Paul called out, 
"Hi. Wanda, draw me a record." 

Wanda, too startled to do anything but 
follow directions, picked up a sketch pad 
and obliged. Later, Paul remembered the 
pantomimists he used to watch in Chicago 
and hit on the idea of synchronizing lip 
movements to the words of a song when 
depicting a scene. 

The frustration which had been piling 
up in Chicago was broken. The Dixons 
began to feel they had found their place 
in the world, and it had an effect on their 
personal lives. Marge became pregnant 
and, when Pamela was born, all their love 
flowed joyfully toward the child. 

Marge says, "We wanted everything for 
Pam, and everything started with a house. 
I think Paul wouldn't have cared how 
much of our future we mortgaged to buy 
it, but I held out for one which wouldn't 



I be too expensive and which would not 
I have to be rebuilt to suit us." 

They found it in the Mount Lookout 
section, a red-brick and white-clapboard 
structure built into the hill in a pleasant, 
moderately prosperous neighborhood. One 
third of the first floor forms the long living 
room, the remaining area is divided between 
dining room, kitchen, hallway and down- 
stairs bedroom. Upstairs there is the 
master bedroom and the children's room. 
Pam, now three, shares it with her brother 
Greg, who is going on two. 

Paul gets a kick out of telling how the 
living room was done over. "Among the 
things we moved down from Chicago," he 
says, "was a davenport we'd bought orig- 
inally down on South Halstead. Every time 
I'd mention replacing it, Marge would 
either suggest we buy another bond or 
remind me there was time enough to re- 
decorate when the kids were beyond the 
sock-everything stage. 

"I patched and repaired and worked over 
that beat-up old wreck until just before 
Christmas, when I decided I'd had enough. 
I told Marge to get her coat— we were 
going out to buy a new davenport." 

They went to a store where the decorator 
was a friend of theirs. When Marge fell 
in love with an ultra-modern curved sofa. 
he objected "You can't buy that," he told 
the Dixons. "You haven't a thing in that 
room which will go with it." 

Marge looked at Paul and Paul looked 
at Marge. Says Paul, "That was it. We 
ended up with new carpet, new drapes, 
new desk, the works. It's going to take a 
while before we get it looking lived-in." 

Judging by the Dixons' genius for adapt- 
ing things to their needs, the living-in 
process should be accomplished this fall. 
Right now, they're too busy having a good 
time in the big back yard. While the chil- 
dren run and play, the elders entertain 



Paul's idea of hospitality is to invite a 
whole gang over for a steak fry at their 
outdoor grill. Steaks are his responsibility, 
whether they happen outdoors or indoors. 
Marge gets the rest of the meal ready, then 
he takes over. 

Their home definitely is the center of 
Paul's universe as well as Marge's. He'd 
rather mow the lawn than play golf and, 
regardless of how busy he is at the studio, 
he's always conscious of what Marge and 
the kids are doing. 

It's ritual with him to telephone Pam 
the minute he finishes a show, and the 
days when she comes down to appear on 
his local programs he's as excited as she is. 
She's the darling of the crew, and Len 
Goorian, who functions both as an occa- 
sional dancer and chief dreamer-upper of 
gimmicks, says she has turned complete 
ham now that she has a fan club composed 
of two other little girls. 

Such intimacy, to viewers, is part of the 
charm of the uninhibited Dixon broadcasts, 
but to Paul himself it has become an in- 
tegrated way of life, one too vital to be 
jeopardized by any big-city offers. To 
talent hunters, he has said, "Where else 
could I have all this?" and to his friend, 
Mort Watters, he stated— when those offers 
arrived frequently— "Draw up a contract. 
I'm staying." 

Watters, ever the man to get a kick out 
of accomplishing the impossible, took a 
wider view. "Why not try to get the net- 
work to pick up from here?" 

In these days, when big telecasting con- 
centrates more and more in New York and 
Hollywood, that took some doing, but they 
managed a test and ratings showed the 
viewers were on their side. 

The young man who once gave up his 
hopes of network fame — for the sake of 
Marge and the family they hoped to have 
—now has home, family and network, too. 




Singer Perry Como presents the grand prize, a solid gold pen 
and pencil set, to sixteen-year-old William Shield, who won the 
Doodling Contest based on Perry's recording of "Noodlin' Rag." 
His entry was sent to disc jockey Alix Blake, WABY, Albany. 



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One Big Happy Family 



(Continued from page 31) 
They seem to be sincerely and truly fond 
of one another. A columnist in New York, 
who attended one of their shows and then 
went on to breakfast with them all, ob- 
served: 'You know, Don, these people 
seem to get along together off the air as 
well as they do on the show. Is this the 
McCoy?" Don solemnly assured him that, 
on the level, it really was. 

The gang is always ready to laugh with 
each other, too. For instance, something 
funny happened to Fran and Patsy Lee at 
one of the hotels on the tour — perhaps it 
was in Washington. It was very early in 
the morning and they had just gotten up. 
They were still in their nighties, about to 
bathe and dress, when the door was opened 
with a passkey and in walked a man 
loaded down with tools and hammers, 
saying: "Is there something wrong with 
your plumbing?" 

Never a dull moment. In Baltimore, a 
midnight fire at the Hippodrome Theatre 
burned up all the show's equipment. 
Everything was set up on the stage for 
next morning's broadcast when, some- 
how, a footlight got overheated, setting 
one of the curtains on fire, and every- 
thing went up in flames in a matter of 
minutes. The program always carries all 
its own engineering equipment — when on 
tour — microphones, cables, speakers, and 
the rest. It all burned, so they had a real 
problem on their hands, and not much 
time to do something about it. 

Informed of the fire after midnight, 
Cliff Petersen and Jimmy Daugherty 
both scurried around Baltimore in the wee 
hours and, luckily, were able to borrow 
emergency engineering equipment from 
local stations. Jimmy spent the rest of the 
night setting it up in the theatre across 
the street. 

The piano had burned, too, so there was 
the big problem of finding another one at 
three in the morning, and also finding a 
truck and driver to get it to the new 
theatre. But, as long as there is a tele- 
phone, Cliff and Jimmy can't be stopped. 
The piano was there in the morning. So 
was an audience of some 3,500 people, 
and — in spite of all the confusion — every- 
one felt it was just about the best Break- 
fast Club performance of the whole trip. 

One thing nobody had thought about, in 
all the excitement, was the show's musical 
library. When travelling, conductor Eddie 
Ballantine usually separates all the mu- 
sic and arranges the different parts for 
the musicians the night before in what- 
ever theatre or studio will be used for 
the broadcast. That way, his musical re- 
hearsal can start right on time in the 
morning. Local musicians are hired in each 
town, and naturally they're not familiar 
with the show's scores. The library con- 
tains about seventy-five different arrange- 
ments — all the themes and marches, plus 
commercial songs and jingles. If anything 
happened to these, it would take weeks 
and weeks to replace them. 

Well, early the next morning, while 
everyone was working frantically at last- 
minute adjustments, in came Maestro Bal- 
lantine, loaded down with all the music. 
For the first time, in all the years of 
Breakfast Club tours, Eddie had taken 
the complete library to his hotel room the 
night before. 

"Don't ask me to explain why I did it," 
he said, "because I honestly don't know. 
Maybe it was some kind of hunch or 
premonition. I've never been one to be- 
lieve much in that, but last night some- 
thing just told me to keep the music with 
me. And I did." To which everyone 






present added a fervent, though silent, 
prayer of thanks. 

Breakfast Clubbers always try to help 
each other, whenever one of them has 
any trouble, and a good example took 
place on their first evening in New York. 
Jimmy Daugherty got an urgent call from 
Chicago that his wife was desperately ill 
in the hospital. Mrs. Daugherty had been | 
expecting a baby and everyone had been 
anxious, because she had suffered mis- 
carriages in the past. Unfortunately, the 
same thing happened again, and the doctor 
phoned Jimmy to come home at once. 

The whole troupe pitched right in to ! 
help in every way they could. Sam and 
Johnny got him an airline reservation, 
packed for him, and took him to the air- 
port. Kay paged Jimmy there and spoke 
to him on the phone, just before his plane 
left, to try to cheer him up. Next morn- 
ing, at "Prayer Time" on the show, the 
entire cast's thoughts were with Mrs. 
Daugherty. Their prayers were answered 
and Jimmy's wife recovered. 

One of the nicest things that happened 
on the Eastern trip, everyone agreed, was 2 
seeing Jimmie Darou, the number- one 
Breakfast Club fan. Back in 1933, he was 
one of the top jockeys in the turf world 
but was tragically injured in a race, re- r ; 
suiting in complete paralysis of his legs. 
Starting a four-year stay in the hospital, 
he began to listen to the show and never 
missed a program from then on. 

In 1949, Jimmie suffered tuberculosis— 
a terrible set-back for someone already so 
sorely troubled. His wife, Gertrude, who 
nursed him through the original accident, 
helped him to run his gas station in 
Montreal when he was taken ill again. 
The station had been presented to him 
years ago, after a big benefit the Montreal 
sportswriters ran for Jimmie, and he has 
made a wonderful business success of it. 

He's now able to get about in a wheel- 
chair, so the Darous came down to New 
York to visit the Breakfast Club. It was 
a grand reunion, because through thej 
years Jimmie has kept up a running cor- 
respondence with Don and all the othei 
members. He has also become a pen pal 
of hundreds of other listeners, some of 
them crippled and ill, like himself. He 
once wrote Don that the show had done 
so much to give him courage and thai 
"Memory Time" and "Inspiration Time' 
had been almost like a religion to him i 
his fight for recovery. 

Last big event of the tour was saying 
goodbye to Patsy Lee, who sang on hei 
last broadcast with the troupe in New 
York — then left for her home town, Oak-, 
land, California, to marry her sweetheart 
Rick Lifvendahl, of the United States | 
Naval Intelligence. The night before hei,; 
departure, the McNeills gave a little party 
for her in their hotel suite. Just the "one- 
big happy family" was there, and thej 
had a marvelous time. 

Sam, Johnny and the fellows had gotter •[ 
all sorts of gag presents for Patsy, every 
thing from a can opener to a rolling pins 
and the whole cast gave her a lovely 
silver platter, with everybody's signature 
engraved around the border. Patsy waJ 
really thrilled! She had still another grea 
surprise the next morning, after her las 1 , 
song. The show's appliance sponsor pre-t 
sented her with a complete kitchen as 4 
wedding gift, and it will be installed in 
her new apartment in California. 

Yes, taking a trip with the Breakfas 
Club gang is like traveling with a family 
Some good, some exciting, some sad, somi It 
tragic things happen — but then, isn't tha 
the way life is for any big happy family' 



Every Day's a Brighter Day 



(Continued from page 44) 
in reading with me. Also because — why 
not be honest about it? — he is dark and 
tall. . . . 

"And then I got the part and I went to 
rehearsal and — it really happened just 
like that. To me and, presumably, to Joe, 
too, for after rehearsal he followed me 
down the hall and asked me if I'd have 
Sinner with him that night. And I said, 
'Of course.' Just as if I'd known that this 
was going to happen to me and, when it 
did, why question it? 

"We had dinner that night at the Fa- 
mous Kitchen, but what we talked about, 
what we ate, how long we stayed, I 
haven't the faintest notion. It was real 
love, like when you are sixteen years 
old. I repeat — you think it won't happen 
to you this way, but it does, it can, it did. 
"We didn't tell each other that night, 
though. I do remember that. Not in words, 
that is. . . ." 

"She looked at me in a kind of way," 
Joe laughed, "and I looked at her in a 
kind of way. When a girl and a man look 
at each other in 'that kind of way,' words 
aren't necessary." 

"Forward of me, wasn't it?" Margaret's 
gentle laugh was embarrassed, "strange of 
me to be like that. Born in Salt Lake City, 
Utah, brought up in the Mormon faith, 
as I was, I come of a very Victorian 
family, to which boldness in a look toward 
a man you'd met just twice would be 
among the unthinkable things! 

"Except that we, of course, were not 
strangers. The instant we met, across a 
mike in a broadcasting studio, we were a 
long way from being strangers. Opposites, 
yes — we have quite different backgrounds. 
Mine, as I've said, a Victorian home in 
Utah; Joe, whose parents were born in 
Italy, from Greenwich Village, New York." 
"There was something about her," Joe 
said, seeming to be thinking out loud. "For 
me, she summed up honesty and a frank 
kind of acceptance of a person as he is. 
She had the freshness of country air. She 
was and is unworldly and unspoiled." 

"To me, on the other hand," Margaret 
said, "Joe expressed the artistic world. He 
was worldly. He was free. By which I 
mean that he was uninhibited in a way 
that I, brought up as I'd been, was not. 
He was sophisticated. He had know-how. 
Above all, he was strong." 

Opposites they are in more ways than 
the background and the geography. Phys- 
ically and in personality, they are total 
"unlikes." Margaret has wide-set and 
beautiful forget-me-not blue eyes. She has 
tawny hair, a fair skin, a tiny waist, a 
gentle mouth. Joe is dark of hair and 
eyes and skin, tall, slender, his features 
forceful. Margaret's voice and manner are 
soft, relaxed, as feminine as if of another 
age. Joe is dynamic, restless, intense and 
intensely masculine. Temperamentally, too, 
they are poles apart — Margaret being 
reticent, withdrawn, tending to keep 
things inside; Joe, the complete reverse. 
"The meeting of East and West," Mar- 
garet summed up, and added: "After that 
first meeting, that first dinner date, Joe 
and I had dinner together every night. 
We worked together on the show every 
Sunday We were never apart when it 
was possible for us to be together. Yet we 
decided to wait a year before we married. 
We wanted to be — we were determined 
to be — very adult. We were resolved to 
be sure that we were sure, if you know 
what I mean. I think the fact that it hit 
us so suddenly made us wary, made us 
fear. This was too sudden!" 

It is difficult, Margaret and Joe ex- 
plained, for humans to accept out-of-this- 



world, too-beautiful things. It is difficult, 
and sometimes dangerous, to believe in 
miracles. 

"But with every day of waiting, and in 
every way," Margaret said, "Joe endeared 
himself to me more and more. As an in- 
stance, I got into a Broadway play, 'For 
Heaven's Sake, Mother,' which starred 
Nancy Carroll. We opened in Philadelphia. 
At that time, Brighter Day was on in the 
morning, which meant that I had to do the 
show, then grab a cab for Penn Station, 
make the trip to Philadelphia, play that 
evening, then back again, getting in at 
three in the morning . . . and every morn- 
ing, Joe met me. Sometimes in Penn 
Station. More often, he'd take the train 
to Trenton and meet me there. I'd be so 
tired and it was so wonderful of him to 
be there." 

Margaret and Joe met (that heart-on 
collision of a first meeting) in May of 
1949. The following December, Joe went 
to Florida to make a picture, "Slattery's 
Hurricane," and they talked about mar- 
riage by mail! "Sort of generally, im- 
personally," she said, "yet not too im- 
personally, for, when he came back from 
Florida, he very quickly proposed. Since 
he was leaving almost immediately for 
Hollywood, the proposal sort of slid in," 
Margaret laughed, "between trains. Actu- 
ally, though, we did have four days to- 
gether during which Joe gave me my ring 
and said 'Some time in June,' and I gave 
him a Christmas (four days before Christ- 
mas) in my room at the Hotel Royalton. 
I had a tree for him, and presents. I don't 
think I hung up his sock that year — but 
I've hung it up every year since, not to 
mention washing it and darning it!" 

On May 23, 1950, Margaret and Joe 
were married in Margaret's home in Salt 
Lake City. An afternoon wedding, with 
Margaret in white linen dress and cap, 
and the family there, and childhood friends. 
And, after the marriage, a four-day hon- 
eymoon in Bryce and Zion Canyons, stay- 
ing at camps and lodges, then back to 
New York to begin this exciting marriage. 
Exciting because— although different in 
looks, personality and temperament — they 
discovered that where life-and-how-to- 
live-it is concerned, they think alike and 
feel alike and are alike. With their talents, 
their many interests, enthusiasms (the 
greatest of these being Christopher Court- 
ney DeSantis, soon to be one year old), 
and with the work of their hands, they 
live life more fully than any two people 
that could be named. 

Their apartment on upper Madison Ave- 
nue in New York, which they found before 
they were married, has been literally 
taken apart and put together again by 
the imaginations, and by the elbow-grease, 
of Signor and Signora DeSantis. 

"We scraped all the floors and all the 
furniture ourselves," Margaret said. "We 
refinished practically every piece of fur- 
niture, including the piano, which was 
an old black veneer and is now the soft 
satiny mahogany Nature intended it to be. 
We painted the whole place ourselves. We 
worked out a color scheme which is really 
rather nice, we think — four shades of 
green, ranging from jade to light olive to 
darker olive to deep dark green. I made 
all the putty-colored draperies in the 
living room. And I recovered, re-uphol- 
stered all the furniture. Together we 
chose the dusty-pink rug. Joe built the 
bookcases, built the bar, the cabinet for 
the radio-phonograph and — when the baby 
came and Joe had to move his tools out of 
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wooden bases. All the sculpture in the 
place is Joe's." 

They have many talents, these two — 
not • the least of which is their acting, as 
most radio listeners know. Margaret is, of 
course, Liz Dennis in the Brighter Day 
series, and for quite a while, during a 
recent episode, Joe was heard as Nathan 
Eldridge, Liz's "admirer." ("On radio," 
Joe laughed, "I was definitely 'the other 
man' in my wife's life!") 

Radio is now, as it has been since she 
played her first CBS role in Joe Powers 
of Oakville, the most important commit- 
ment in Margaret's professional life. Yet 
when she first came to New York, fresh 
out of the University of Utah, she was 
auditioned for and won a membership 
in the Chekhov Theatre, with which she 
toured for eighteen months, learning about 
acting — in the great tradition — from the 
famous Michael Chekhov, who directed 
the company. Later, she did summer stock, 
was understudy in the Theatre Guild's 
road company of "Papa Is All," and ap- 
peared on Broadway. 

Joe, in addition to radio-by-the-yard 
(he's been on just about every crime 
series on, and over, the networks), has 
also been in more than twenty Broadway 
plays. At the time of this conversation, he 
had just finished a run in "Golden Boy" 
on Broadway. He's done a number of 
movies, the most recent being "Man With 
A Cloak," "Deadline USA" and "The 
Titan," narrated by Frederic March, for 
which Joe did eight off-stage voices. 

Margaret attends a class in modern 
dancing, and one of Joe's big hobbies is 
photography. "The bathroom," laughed 
Margaret, "becomes the dark-room." And 
there is Joe's sculpting, which is, Mar- 
garet says pridefully, "more, a great deal 
more, than a hobby." 

Joe describes his sculpture as: "A sort 
of semi-abstract." For his work he uses 
ebony, long-leaf yellow pine, mahogany, 
maple, a great deal of teak. "I work in 
stone, too," he said, "in Belgian black 
marble and similar materials. I've given 
up the idea of trying to earn a living with 
sculpture," Joe added, rather resignedly. 
"It's far too chancy. If it were not, I'd 
prefer to be a sculptor, rather than an 
actor." 

"If sculpture provided a consistent liv- 
ing, however modest, that's all we'd need," 
Margaret said, "for Joe and I live very 
simply. I do my own cooking and my 
own — " 

"Speaking of Margaret's cooking re- 
minds me," Joe interrupted with a real 
loud laugh, "of the dish she cooked for 
me — my favorite dish, chili con came — 
soon after we were married. She went to 
the greatest pains to get all the required 
ingredients and when, man-like, I made a 
suggestion — namely, that a dash more chili 
would be an improvement — the suggestion 
was received with what can only be de- 
scribed as a pained silence. However, she 
went to the kitchen to fetch the chili, only 
to discover that there was no chili in the 
house nor had there been while she was 
preparing the dish. She'd been using curry. 
As far as chili con curry is concerned, it 
was a wonderful dish!" Joe laughed again, 
fit to kill. 

Said Margaret, wrinkling her pretty 
nose at her convulsed mate, "I learned my 
lesson. Now Mr. DeSantis does the intri- 
cate dishes — his specialties being a mar- 
velous Italian spaghetti and Hungarian 
stew. But, as I was saying when so 
amusingly interrupted, I do my own — er 
— cooking and my own housework. I have 
a nurse for the baby, but only because 
my work necessitates it. At that, I take a 
great deal of the care of Chris myself, for 
Joe has a very strong feeling, which I 
share, that a mother should take care of 



her child. We spend our money on books 
and theatre-going and materials for Joe's 
sculpture and my painting. And on our 
car. And on little side trips, day trips 
to Connecticut and Long Island, where we 
camp out on friends. Most of our free 
evenings we spend at home, just talking — 
for we're talkers. We sit and talk and talk, 
always planning things, plans for travel, 
plans for theatre buildings, plans for the 
house in the country we hope to have one 
day when what Joe calls 'our state of 
free-lance flux' settles down into a more 
predictable pattern. 

"We talk about Christopher and how we 
want him to grow up, as a child should 
grow up, without too many fears, without 
too many restrictions. His whole life is 
within him, we feel, and he must live his 
life his way. 

"I had a very good start with the baby, 
by the way," Margaret said, "for I took 
a number of courses while carrying him." 
(Can you beat it? Can you possibly beat I 
this girl for energy, for enterprise, for 
living it up to the happy hilt?!) "One of 
them was at the Maternity Consultation 
Service on York Avenue, where I learned 
all about bathing him, feeding him, minor 
ailments, layette-planning, and how little 
you really need — four sheets, for instance, 
four towels and nothing fancy, unless by 
way of gifts. 

"Best of all, I think, we used the room- 
ing-in plan at the hospital. The rooming- 
in plan, which I recommend with all my 
heart, simply means that the baby is 
kept in the room with his mother from 
birth (except when there are visitors), 
instead of in the nursery. The theory is 
that the baby, forcibly separated from 
the mother at birth, is affected by the '• 
separation, is frightened, lonely. As proof 
of this, the babies in the nursery cry a 
great deal; babies 'rooming' with their 
mothers very little, if at all. Chris cried 
not at all and, for my part, when I brought 
him home, I knew how to handle him, 
was used to him, wasn't afraid. The plan 
contributes a great deal, I believe, to 
giving the baby a sense of security, of 
being safe, of being loved. . . ." 



At this very moment, as if on cue, enter 
young Christopher, who is the living 
image, in minature, of his father . . . 
dark curly hair, brown eyes . . . friendly, 
active, husky and happy young Chris- 
topher, who seems to sense, as babies do, 
that he has come to a happy home with 
love in it, and to spare. 

And so he has. With life in it, too, and 
to spare. . . . 

In the hallway of the DeSantis apart- 
ment, there is a bulletin board (an in-j 
genious device dreamed up by Margaret 
and Joe) to which is thumbtacked what 
appear to be, at first glance, bits and 
pieces of paper, menus, theatre programs, 
grocery lists and the like. And so they 
are — reminders, Margaret explained to me, 
of things to be done, things they want to 
do. There was, for instance, the program 
of a Martha Graham recital. "We did 
catch that," said Joe. There was a pro- 
gram of films to be seen at the Museum 
of Modern Art. "None of which," sighed 
Margaret, "we've had time to see." There 
were recipes Margaret — or Joe — is going 
to try some day. There were lists of things 
Joe is going to do: "Springs in couch, 
tie up . . . Fix card table so it won't fall 
. . . Put away picture frames stacked in 
the hall . . . Send clothes to the Salvation 
Army." There was a lovely little water 
color of Margaret's, a Georgian bedroom, 
inscribed: "To be framed." There were 
telephone numbers and book titles and 
the names of friends. . . . Memos, these, 
of an exciting marriage, of a rich, full 
and varied life. 



If Ilou Must Leave Home 



(Continued from page 67) 
my dreams — for the rest of my life. That's 
why I left home. 

When I was a child, my dad, who comes 
from a long line of ministers and doctors, 
says that I acted out my prayers for the 
angels. Be that as it may, I wanted to 
act in anything for anyone. And so it 
wasn't just stubbornness which made me 
say no to college and a comfortable ex- 
istence at home. It was an inner drive 
which made me certain that, once I'd 
tried my wings, I would succeed. Sell- 
ing wax from door to door — my first job 
when I left my comfortable home — wasn't 
exactly what I'd had in mind but, when 
you're young and fired with faith in 
yourself and your ability, even selling 
from door to door has a purpose. This 
gave me time to make the rounds of the 
agencies and — to my family's amazement 
and my own — I wrote home, a few weeks 
after I left, with the news that I'd been 
cast for a nice part in a Chicago play en- 
titled "The Copperhead," with Ian Keith. 
Through this, I learned one thing every 
girl should know when she goes out on 
her own. Make friends with the people 
with whom you work. Hazel Haslam, the 
star of the play, was a woman, much older 
than myself, but a woman who perhaps 
helped me more than any other. I con- 
sidered her almost a "second mother," 
for she was the woman to whom I could 
confide my hopes, my dreams, my fears, 
and from whom I could get sound guid- 
ance and advice in my daily living. 

During the run of the play I quit selling 
wax, but not being one to put my eggs 
all in one basket, as it were, I auditioned 
for radio. And I became a saleswoman of 
the airwaves, the voice of the commercials. 
When the play closed, I still had a fairly 
steady income, and then fate intervened 
again and I was offered a chance to un- 
derstudy the role of Violet in the Chicago 
company of "My Sister Eileen." One 
beautiful matinee, I "went on" and the 
play's writers saw me and suggested that 
I continue in the road-show company of 
the play. I was in seventh heaven, but 
my parents were definitely not! 

It was one thing to be near them in 
Chicago, where they could keep their 
very comforting parental hand in, but 
quite another to go traipsing about the 
country in a theatrical company. The 
second lesson I learned from leaving 
home came hard, but I think it's one 
which every girl should know about. 
After my parents' first strenuous objec- 
tions, I knew that mere words were not 
going to be enough to prove to them that 
I would be all right away from home. I 
finally decided that, although their ob- 
jections were all valid, I might possibly 
overcome them by showing them the 
company I would be keeping — let them 
in on the people who made up my world, 
so they would better understand that 
world. There is always a common meet- 
ing-ground if you only search long 
enough. Sure enough, when my parents 
met charming Marcy Wescott, who was 
to be our leading lady, and she had prom- 
ised that she would share her room with 
me, look after me, comfort me, my par- 
ents were delighted— if I wouk! just go 
for a while. I kept them posted by letter 
as the happy months sped by, and it was 
a year before I finally returned home. 

I think I really grew up during that 
year. Perhaps some girls have a tendency 
to throw off the traces and run wild, so 
to speak, but I found that I was too happy, 



too busy to have any such desires. Marcy, 
Gretchen Davidson and myself always 
shared living quarters, for— although I've 
been a bachelor girl for many years now 
—I've learned that sharing living with a 
girl friend or my sister or another actress 
is more fun than living alone. 

As I look back on those early years of 
being away from home, I know that any 
young girl can maintain the respect of 
her fellow workers, and more important, 
her own self-respect, with just a small 
amount of work at it. For a few wild 
moments, I've often seen a girl throw 
away a lifetime of happiness. You have 
to live with yourself for a great many 
years, so why jeopardize those years for 
a momentary fling? I think if you build 
a solid building the foundation must be 
strong. I know my wonderful home life 
and early training are responsible for 
that attitude, for many is the time I've 
felt a sense of great gratitude toward my 
parents for their help in "building my 
building." 

Personal freedom must always be ac- 
companied by personal responsibilities, 
otherwise the freedom is a noose with 
which to hang yourself. In the "My Sister 
Eileen" company, I made the staggering 
sum of seventy-five dollars a week— and I 
saved every penny I could, for I was 
determined that, while I was free to 
spend the money as I wished, if I was to 
succeed, I must have a nest egg which 
would see me through the lean months 
which might follow. After the play, I 
moved to New York and, with the savings 
I'd accumulated, I was able to live com- 
fortably while I tried out for a daytime 
radio drama. I landed the job and found 
I had a steady role and a steady income. 
Two years later, I was offered a contract 
m Hollywood and, from then on, motion 
picture work and radio work have kept 
me busy. 

My sister, who is a medical technician, 
and I have established a home in the 
apartment we share together. Here we 
have a Monday-through-Friday maid who 
does all the heavy work during the week, 
leaving the house free for our care on 
weekends. We've made the curtains, pur- 
chased the furniture ourselves. When 
we're not busy with our work, our cooking 
or our entertaining, we embroider— an 
old-fashioned occupation which we in- 
clude in our wide range of interests. I 
know it keeps hands busy, and there's 
an old saying which goes with that one. 

My mother and dad moved to Los An- 
geles last Christmas, partly because I 
could so seldom get to Joliet. My parents 
are still my best friends and, when I look 
around at the relationships between my 
friends and their parents, I'm eternally 
grateful that my breaking away from 
home was accomplished in such a way 
that there has never been any ill feeling 
between us. 

During the period when I was only in 
Joliet for fifteen-minute intervals, in- 
between plane flights from New York to 
Hollywood, my whole family dashed down 
to say hello and wave goodbye. My 
brother's little boy saw me on these rare 
occasions and about the third time it hap- 
pened he asked, "Aunt Audrey, do you 
live in the sky?" 

Sometimes I feel as if I really do. I 
love being Millie of Jackson Heights, I 
love the villainous-heroine parts I get in 
the movies, I love the life I lead with its 
freedom and its responsibilities. Using a 
little good sense, I know any girl can 
build a happy, wonderful life. 



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(Continued from page 68) 
husband and wife should take vacations 
together, contrary to some people's ideas. 
Buff: That's because on a vacation you 
usually have more laughs and more fun 
than the rest of the year, so why not 
share it? It happens that Mike and I 
spend almost twenty-four hours a day 
together, because of our work. But, some- 
how, being together on a vacation puts 
us on even better terms, because on a 
vacation we get away from our problems 
and we're both more relaxed and at peace 
with the world. 

Mike: We think that a girl who isn't 
married should try to find another con- 
genial girl to go with, unless she is going 
to visit people or go to a place where she 
has friends. For her, too, fun shared is 
fun doubled, and there are always some 
places she might not care about going to 
alone, when on a trip. 

Buff: But, if you're a couple and you 
team up with another couple, it can be a 
very good idea for each to take their 
own car— if it's a motor trip— and have 
separate cabins or hotel reservations, and 
then spend the rest of the time together. 
That way, you're free part of the trip 
and they're free, too. 

Mike: We have learned a few things 
about packing. We think each person 
should have his own bag or bags. We try 
to take only one each, and what Buffie 
calls a "spill-over bag," which we use 
jointly— the one which ends up holding 
all the soiled laundry. 

Buff: The girl's vanity case should 
hold the man's things, too, but she should 
pack it. And she should figure ahead 
what kind of clothes she will need, and 
get the ones that will make her feel and 
look the most comfortable. If they dress 
certain nights, she has to prepare for that 
Summer versions of the short cocktail 
dress, or evening tops with separate 
skirts which can be teamed with daytime 
blouses, too, will take care of that. The 
more separates she has, the more changes 
she can make without crowding her suit- 
case. Two sets of accessories should be 
enough, like patent leather bag, shoes 
and perhaps a wide and a narrow belt, 
and maybe a light brown or a beige set 
which will go with any color. One hand- 
bag ought to be big enough to double as 
a beach bag, if you're planning any swim- 
ming. 

Mike: As for the man, all he needs is 
enough sports clothes to be comfortable. 
Even if he doesn't get a chance to wear 
them much at home, he ought to splurge 
a little when he's buying for a vacation. 
Buff: Let's not forget food. 
Mike: We think that, if you eat in a 
definite routine at home, you shouldn't 
on a vacation. Sometimes, Buff and I eat 
at least five meals a day when we're away, 
a thing we'd never do ordinarily. 

Buff: We just stuff! And we eat the 
special dishes that belong to each locality 
we visit. Lobster and clams in New 
England. Cracked crab and abalone in 
San Francisco. In Cuba, soup made of 
those big meaty beans, chock-filled with 
rice and swimming with big chunks of 
those wonderfully sweet Spanish onions. 
We serve that sometimes as a Sunday- 
night supper dish and our friends are 
crazy about it. I collect recipes wherever 
we go, the way other people collect sou- 
venirs. 

Mike: You keep on remembering where 

you first ate a certain dish and it makes 

you re-live the pleasures of the vacation. 

Buff: If you take a vacation on a 

limited budget — and who doesn't? — I think 



it's fun to plan for one bang-up time. In 
New York or some other big city, it might 
be dinner at one of the famous night clubs. 
Or a row of hit shows, night after night. 
Or extravagance in taking cabs wherever 
you go. 

Mike: I heartily disagree with the idea 
of a night-club spree, if you've got any 
budget at all to be considered. I suggest 
going to the bar of some famous place at 
cocktail time. You don't have to drink 
anything but lemonade or a Coke, and 
you can gape at just as many famous 
people without blowing the whole bank- 
roll. Unless, of course, dining there is 
the one thing you would rather do than 
anything else. Better get a good idea of 
what it will cost you before you get in- 
volved. 

Buff: I say amen to that, too. And, 
you, know some people have very satis- 
factory vacations right at home. But it 
is pretty difficult unless you have simply 
tremendous will-power. Enough will- 
power to say that you won't do anything 
you don't want to do, and not any longer 
than you do want to do it. 
Mike: Sounds a little involved, Buffie. 
Buff: You know very well what I mean. 
The only thing is that, this way, you 
could lose your friends — to say nothing 
of your wife — if you asserted your inde- 
pendence too definitely. Of course, if a 
husband likes to fish, his wife could en- 
courage him to go off fishing for the day. 
Mike: Oh, yeah? I can just see a wife 
letting her husband go fishing alone when 
he's on vacation and she's just dying to 
go places with him. 

Buff: As a matter of fact, I really 
think both men and women want to get 
away and meet new people and see dif- 
ferent things, especially if they live in 
small places or don't get out as much as 
they would like. They want to eat in 
restaurants and maybe go to more movies. 
They want to stop in for snacks when 
they see cute little places and not have 
to worry about spoiling their regular 
meals, because meals can be any time 
they feel like eating. 

Mike: We think the whole idea of a 
vacation is to change your point of view 
a little. Read a different newspaper, lis- 
ten to what other people are talking about, 
see the things that pass you by the rest 
of the year. Even a ferry ride can be a 
big treat, if you've never taken one before. 
Buff: Look at the little magazines you 
can get at hotel desks, which tell you what 
to see in the city you're visiting. Or watch 
the newspapers for news of special events, 
like art exhibitions, fairs, festivals, bus 
and boat trips. 

Mike: All the places are interesting 
when they're new to you, if you have any 
tourist blood at all. 

Buff: Actually, my idea of a really 
good two weeks is to live it up the first 
week, do everything wonderful you have 
planned, then go some place and just sit 
and soak up all the sun you can, so you 
come back looking fine and feeling rested. 
Only, you should have one last big even- 
ing. 

Mike: Oh, sure, and ruin the whole va- 
cation by coming home as tired as when 
you left. 

Buff: It won't be the same kind of tired 
feeling. You will have all that good 
change of scene and pace to carry you 
over until the next vacation. You know 
very well, Mike, that's what always hap- 
pens to us. We come home tired, but 
happy. Vacation is nothing that a good 
night's sleep in your own bed can't cure! 



A Present for Michael 



(Continued jrom page 8) 
into my last month, I really did forget 
completely, from time to time. It no 
longer mattered. There were more urgent 
things, more exciting things, to think 
about than that old wound. And Bill 
perked up correspondingly. I suppose 
several weeks went by without a single 
quarrel. We didn't even argue when he 
told me, one Thursday at breakfast, that 
he had to fly to San Francisco on business 
over the weekend. 

"Short notice, Bill," I said. "Is it some- 
thing important?" 

"Well, sure, or I wouldn't leave you 
alone right now. Um — I'll tell you about 
it when it's settled. I hate to go, Bert. 
Did the doctor really say it might be any 
time now?" 

I smiled at his troubled face. "Really, 
I couldn't feel better. And if anything 
happens — even if I feel lonesome — I'll just 
call somebody to come over. Your sister 
Meta, maybe." 

"Well . . ." Bill said uncertainly. "Be 
sure you call Meta, honey." He kissed me 
quickly and hurried off. 

Such concern, I thought as I went about 
the morning routine. Such fatherly, hus- 
bandly concern. It was nice, though. 
Everything was nice, these days. The way 
the little house — and not so little, either, I 
thought proudly — shone and gleamed. All 
at once I began to laugh, realizing that 
I'd been talking busily out loud for the 
past five minutes. I would call Meta, I 
decided. Calm as you might be in the last 
few days, I guess you are never as calm 
as you think. I could use Meta's lovely 
face across the table, and her wonderful 
figure as an inspiration to get busy on my 
own the minute the baby was born. 

As it turned out, it was lucky I did call 
her, for the very next morning I woke up 
feeling queer, and by afternoon, sitting in 
the living room watching the desk clock, 
we decided it was time to call the doctor 
and get me to the Selby Flats Hospital. 
The next thing, I was fully awake and 
Meta was leaning over me, whispering, 
"Bert? Bert! It's the most wonderful 
boy!" 

Dimly I answered her smile, but I wasn't 
satisfied. The father, I thought hazily, 
ought to be the one. . . . Then, behind 
Meta, I did see Bill, his eyes blazing with 
joy as he pushed her aside. But, even as 
I met his kiss, the small dissatisfaction 
remained. He should have been there all 
along. His should have been the first face 
I saw. Falling slowly, softly into sleep, 
the thought came with me. No matter 
what, Bill shouldn't have left me alone. 

I woke up to a sunshiny new world, a 
room full of flowers, and an indescribable 
feeling of calm, but eager, expectancy. I 
remembered the dissatisfaction, but I no 
longer felt it. Who cared? What mat- 
tered was that the baby was fine— the 
recollections of the last few hours were 
creeping back now and I remembered 
the doctor's voice in the delivery room, 
making a satisfied comment to the nurse! 

A perfect baby. Relief and gratitude 
flooded over me as, a little later, the nurse 
brought him in for feeding. In about 
twenty minutes, the nurse came back, 
took the sleeping baby, and left me a 
folded morning paper in his place. I was 
too drowsy to do more than glance at the 
front page. But after lunch I suddenly 
felt restless. How quickly one's strength 
came back! It was a miracle, really, the 
whole complex business. . . . 

I sighed, fidgeted, and took up the 
paper. From habit I turned to the theatri- 
cal page, and followed with mild interest 



the activities I felt I ought to keep up 
with for Bill's sake. The television and 
radio news. I glanced down the column 
and was about to turn the page when my 
eye picked up the name of Bill's agency. 
And then I read the paragraph in which 
it appeared . . . and gasped, and read it 
again, and then sat, stunned and numb, 
while my mind took it in. Instinct forced 
me to breathe deeply, to relax. But long 
after my heart slowed down and my face 
lost its furious warmth, my thoughts went 
clicking along in a tight, angry rhythm. 
So that was it. So that was why he went 
to San Francisco — why he couldn't be 
here when his son was born. Once again 
she was dividing him from us. . . . 

I took some trouble to be in good shape 
by the time Bill came in. I spent quite a 
time with a mirror and some make-up, 
because I'd learned long ago that a woman 
had to go into battle looking her best if 
she hoped to win. And this, I foresaw, was 
going to be quite a battle. 

Nothing could have been more disarm- 
ing than Bill's dazed happiness, or the 
armful of magazines and candy and 
flowers he spilled lavishly on the bed. He 
kissed me, and then stood back and shook 
his head. 

"Gosh, it's a funny feeling. Isn't it 9 
They let me look at him, through the 
nursery window. I saw him— he's real. 
Bert, honestly, can you believe it?" 

"Well, yes," I said. I folded my hands 
on the sheet. "I had him, remember? 
That makes it easier, when you've been 
right there with the event, as it were. 
Oh, thanks, for the flowers and candy and 
things." 

"Don't thank me, Bert. Don't thank 
me for anything. There's nothing I—" he 
hesitated. "Sounds corny. But oh, Bert, 
do you feel the way I do, that everything 
is different as of now? We're different 
We'll be better. Stronger. Smarter, too! 
I feel as if I could get hold of the moon, 
if it would do you and the baby any good 
to have it. We're going to have every- 
thing, Bert, and do everything and be 
everything . . just for him." 

I let him take my hand. For a minute I 
was really joined with him. He did love 
us. We were his family. No other feeling 
could ever be quite like that. Bill was 
ours.^ This other thing was outside, it 
didn't matter. But my hand stiffened of 
itself, and I drew it away. It did matter. 
I said quietly, "This is really your big 
weekend, isn't it? Two important 
events. . . ." 

"Two?" He frowned, and then he stif- 
fened, too. "I get it. You've seen the 
paper, I take it? You know. I was going 
to tell you, Bert, just as soon as I— but I 
couldn't find the right words. I had a 
feeling it would be hard to get you to 
understand." 

"But _ why?" I didn't feel angry, I 
wouldn't let myself. But my voice took 
on an edge that even I could hear, and it 
pleased me to see Bill wincing under it. 
"Why hard? Just because your agency 
has sold a program to an important spon- 
sor? Just because it was you who sold 
it, who— gave birth to it, one might say? 
Just because it happens to be called The 
Woman Gloria, and happens to star a 
singer you thought you were in love with 
a few months ago? But it's nothing, Bill. 
Nothing at all. It hardly matters in the 
least that your own wife was so deluded 
she thought that woman was out of your 
life completely. Just explain it to me, 
I'll understand. I'll understand it was 
more important to go to San Francisco to 
sell this woman's show than to stay here 
when your baby was being born — to say 




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nothing of your having anything to do 
with her at all, which I haven't words to 
say anything about. . . ." 

Bill held his head. "Oh, brother," he 
said. "Here we go again." 

I felt almost sorry for him. It was a 
hard spot to get out of. What could he 
say? The plain fact was that all the time 
I'd been foolishly congratulating myself 
on how well things were going, he'd been 
seeing that woman, working with her, 
planning this show and making her career 
an important part of his own . . . and I'd 
thought she was out of his life forever. 
The bitterness I'd believed dead came 
rushing back and engulfed me. I could 
feel it, all the old humiliation and horror. 

And all the time Bill talked. ... It was 
business. Nothing but business. Gloria 
was a good singer, she had a special qual- 
ity, he'd suddenly thought of her when 
the client started looking for something 
new. . . . The agency was aglow because 
it looked as if Bill had something big. . . . 

"It could mean a vice-presidency for 
me, Bert. You'd like that? What differ- 
ence does it make how I get it, if I swear 
it's only business?" 

"Why did it have to be you who de- 
veloped the show?" I said. He explained 
all over again that it had just happened, 
that Gloria's husband, a theatrical agent 
named Sid Harper, had talked to him 
about the possibility of doing something 
on TV just at the right time . . . that Sid 
was really responsible for building the 
show. 

"But they wouldn't have gotten the 
chance except for you." 

"But it's a chance for me, too. If the 
show goes over, and the client seems to 
be crazy about it, well, it could mean 
really big things for me. I couldn't kick 
that kind of chance in the face," Bill 
argued. "Bert, believe me, as far as I'm 
concerned she and the show are a prop- 
erty, a — a piece of merchandise." 

There was a long silence in the hospital 
room, as I lay back, pretending to be ex- 
hausted but really very busy behind my 
closed eyelids. I did believe him; if I 
didn't, I'd be screaming my head off and 
talking divorce, baby or no baby. So— 
why not give in, quit arguing? Things 
had been so nice, just these few weeks 
past, when we'd been friends — in my 
stupid innocence. Let us be friends again; 
why fight? I didn't feel friendly; I 
couldn't. 

That slow rebirth of tenderness, of 
reaching toward Bill as it had been in the 
early days of our marriage, that was 
nipped in the bud. But what was the use 
of fighting and yelling? Somehow, sooner 
or later, I'd figure out a way to get that 
woman and her program out of my life . . . 
somehow. But, in the meantime, I couldn't 
afford to waste energy in arguments. 

It was a truce. Warily at first, and then 
with slow relief, Bill saw that I wasn't 
going to rant and rave. It made all our 
dealings much pleasanter, of course, and 
my days at the hospital went by in 
dreamy, more or less contented preoccu- 
pation. There were only two flurries . . . 
one when I insisted on calling the baby 
Michael . . . the other when I asked for 
a television set in the room. Bill realized 
I wanted it to see just one show. But he 
had it set up, and I watched The Woman 
Gloria a couple of times. Program time 
coincided with one of Michael's feedings, 
so it got scant attention after my first 
look at it. I got a queer flash of satisfac- 
tion the evening Bill came in and saw 
Gloria yapping away on the screen, with 
me so busy with Michael I wasn't even 
glancing at her. "Glad you came in— you 
can turn that thing off," I said casually. 
"You don't want to see it? I mean — " 



Bill blushed, and snapped off the set 
quickly. 

I smiled secretly over Michael's dark 
fuzzy head. "When you've seen it once, 
you've seen it, haven't you? There's 
nothing earth-shaking to watch for. Be- 
sides, I can't bother with anything else 
when Michael's around." 

"Bert . " Bill hesitated. "Look, are 
you sure about the name? I mean — I'd 
sort of counted on his being Bill, Jr. 
Maybe Michael could be his middle name 
if you like it so much." It was a plea, 
but I didn't let him see I knew. I had 
made up my mind. 

"No. I gave it plenty of thought Bill 
The night you were in San Francisco it 
sort of came to me." I almost believed it 
myself, it was such a just punishment for 
his not being with me when he should 
have been. "Michael, that's what I kept 
thinking that night. I had no one to tall; 
it over with, so. . . ." 

Bill flushed. "Punishing me, Bert, for 
something you agreed at the time I 
couldn't avoid? That's kind of petty, isn't 
it?" 

"You don't think I'd be petty about a 
thing as important as our child's name, the 
one he's going to carry for the rest of hi? 
life?" I glanced away from Bill's accus- 
ing eyes. They were saying altogether 
too clearly: Come off it, Bert, you knoir 
what you're doing. You know you're get- 
ting back at me, and it is petty, it is mean 
The day I was allowed to leave the 
hospital came at last. I was terribly eager 
to get Michael into his own room and 
start making him at home there. Bill told 
me to call the office as soon as I knew 
exactly what time we'd be ready to leave 
and he'd come pick us up, and Meta 
assured me she'd have everything ready 
Bill and his secretary were both away 
from their desks when I called. Nurse 
Holt got us ready so early that there was 
nothing for me to do but hang around, a 
superfluous graduate mother, on that busy 
floor. Besides, there was the timing — I 
had to get home for Michael's next feed- 
ing or we'd be held up for hours. Any- 
way, there was plenty of reason for me 
just to get dressed, get the desk down- 
stairs to call me a cab, and simply take 
Michael home myself. Plenty of good, 
honest reasons . . . except that, when Bill 
came storming into the house, later that 
afternoon, and I saw the glare of incredu- 
lous fury he gave me, I felt a stab of 
satisfaction that told me plainer than words 
what my real reason had been. A touch 
of shame went with it, when I realized 
how hurt Bill was . . . but I was being 
hurt all along, wasn't I, as long as that pro- 
gram was flaunted at me every evening? 
"Sh — you'll wake Mike," I whispered 
"Wake Mike! I'll tear the place down," 
Bill said, but caught himself in the act of 
slamming the door and closed it quietly 
"Where is he? Can I go up? Bert, I just 
don't get you. How could you — never 
mind, I want to see my son first." 

He was up there so long I almost went 
after him, but I decided to wait and give 
him time to calm down. He strode in 
after a while and made himself a drink 
without offering me one, and only after 
he had done away with half of it did he 
trust himself to speak. 

"Of all the rotten tricks, Bert. J 
wouldn't have thought it even of you." He 
spoke quietly, but the glass was shaking 
in his hand. Again I felt a vague shame, 
but my own sense of what was right 
stiffened me. 

"It wasn't a trick, if you mean my com- 
ing home alone — " 

"You knew what it meant to me. You 
know how I've been waiting all week 
long, planning just how it would be- 
how I'd roll out the red carpet, how I'd 



go with trumpets and drums to escort my 
family home. My family." Bitterness 
edged his voice. "How could you cheat 
me like this? It'll never come again, this 
one moment — and now I haven't had it. 
I haven't brought my son home." 

"Well, I did call, Bill. But you weren't 
there, and it was getting sort of late, and 
really can you tell me what point there 
was in my hanging around — " 

"Don't give me that, it makes me sick," 
Bill flung at me. "Excuses, double-talk, 
treating me like a fifth wheel. What goes 
on, anyway? And let me tell you an- 
other thing. I don't like this stuff about 
sh-sh, you'll wake the baby. If you think 
I'm going to put myself on a schedule and 
wait around to see my son as if I were 
one of the peasants getting his annual 
chance to see the squire, you're crazy. By 
golly he's my son, and he's going to be 
part of my life and I'm going to be a darn 
great big part of his, and if you think — •" 

"What have you got to complain about, 
Bill Bauer? After all, all I've got is this 
house and my baby to keep my life ex- 
citing. Aren't you being a little bit selfish 
to want to cut me out? After all, you've 
got plenty of important things to keep 
busy with. All your work at the agency, 
all those big deals with television shows 
and important clients. . . ." 

There was a pause. Bill stared down 
into his glass, finished it off, and slapped 
it down on a table. Silently I picked it 
up and polished away with my handker- 
chief the damp ring it left. After a while 
he said very quietly, "So that's it. I was 
fooling myself all along. I knew it. You 
were never big enough to mean what you 
said — " 

"What I said? What did I say?" I chal- 
lenged him. "Did I ever say I could just 
put it out of my mind, all this stuff with 
that woman? Do you think any woman 
could? You're not that dumb, Bill, not 
even you. How would you feel if there 
were some man who'd wanted to marry 
me, and I still kept him hanging 
around? . . ." 

"Let's not go into it, Bert, huh?" The 
anger had quieted. Bill seemed more 
thoughtful now than anything else. He 
was turning something over in his mind. 
Into the silence, Meta's voice came from 
the kitchen, saying, unemotionally, "Din- 
ner is served, if anyone cares." 

Everything considered, it was a pleasant 
dinner in the end. Bill's effort to put aside 
his anger was so evident that I felt it 
would be smart of me to meet him half- 
way. There was Meta to consider, too; 
she was hardly a stranger, but still you 
don't want a third party in on all your 
quarrels. And then, anyway, there was 
Michael. His tiny presence sleeping away 
upstairs made everything else trivial. 
Both Bill and I relaxed, as the evening 
went on, in making plans for him, in won- 
dering what he'd be like, in sneaking up 
to peer in at him, marveling. I felt so 
good when we went to bed that I hand- 
somely offered to let Bill give him a nick- 
name, since he disliked the name Michael. 

"It's not that I dislike it, it's just that I 
wanted — oh well, never mind that. Let's 
see. What did that nurse use to call him? 
Butch. I like that pretty well." 

Butch. If that wasn't just like a man. 
Still ... it was a small concession. I'd 
keep calling him Michael, and Bill could 
have Butch for his own. 

Yes, things settled down. For the next 
few days, apart from Bill's rather frown- 
ing thoughtfulness, the Bauer house was 
everything a new infant's home ought to 
be, complete with doting aunt in the shape 
of Meta. . . . But I knew Bill was as con- 
scious as I that there was an open question 
still unsettled. I didn't know, yet, what 



I could do about it, but while that show 
went on, and while Bill was such a big 
factor in it, I just couldn't relax and act 
happy about everything. 

One afternoon Bill came home early, 
went up to look at Michael — he always 
called it "playing with Butch," though, of 
course, the baby was too young to be 
played with, really — and came down again 
with an expression of such obvious de- 
termination that I simply stopped pre- 
paring dinner and said, "Well, come on, 
let's have it. I can see there's some- 
thing on your mind." 

Bill cleared his throat. "I don't like to 
bring it up, but one of us has to — " 

"If it's about Gloria — pardon me, I mean 
The Woman Gloria, as on television — 
don't spare my feelings, Bill. You don't 
think it's far from my mind whether or 
not I talk about it, I hope." 

"That's just it," Bill said. He opened 
the icebox, peered into it, and closed it 
again without getting interested in any of 
its contents. "I had to do something, Bert. 
The strain was just getting too much for 
me. So I— well, I've been working some- 
thing out at the office and I think I've put 
it over. It looks pretty set that Gloria's 
program may go network very shortly." 

I eyed him. "Well? Do you want me 
to write her a letter of congratulation?" 

He flushed. "Please, Bert. I'm trying 
to explain that I've done something for 
you, to make you more — more — well, any- 
way, the point is, if it does, it'll probably 
mean everyone on the show goes to New 
York, and the show will come from there." 

"Oh, Bill!" I turned away, to hide the 
sudden quivering of my lips. I suppose 
it was the measure of how far apart we'd 
come that I wouldn't let my husband see 
me crying, but something stiff and un- 
yielding inside me kept me from showing 
him any softness. "That would be fine 
with me." I said. I added firmly, "It'll 
be best for everyone. You'll see — es- 
pecially for you." 

"It makes no difference to me if it comes 
from New Zealand," Bill snapped. "Only 
I can't go on the way we've been, Bert. 
You're all tied up with Butch, never any 
time for me — sleeping in his room on that 
cot—" 

"It's because I don't want to disturb you 
when I get up to feed him at night, I told 
you that." 

"And I don't believe you. Why, even 
Meta's more part of this family than I 
am. Do you realize that? Anytime I 
sneak in to see my son I get dirty looks 
from the two of you as if I were going 
in to cast an evil spell — " He stopped, 
drew a deep breath, and went on, "Enough 
of that. I get the message. Things aren't 
going to be right around here until I shed 
this TV show. So okay. Bert. . . ." He 
came over and forced me to look at him. 
"Do you see now that I'll do — anything 
I can to keep everything right for us? 
Do you believe me?" 

With Bill's serious blue eyes so close, 
and his thin, worried face almost touch- 
ing mine, I couldn't remain cold. I put 
my hand against his cheek, and the 
warmth of the gesture startled both of us. 
To me it was like an electric shock, for 
even as I touched his face it came to me 
how dreadfully long it had been since I 
had shown Bill any tenderness, or allowed 
him to be sweet to me. And yet I loved 
him; I still loved him, and I didn't really 
want to make him as unhappy as he'd 
been. . . I slipped my arms round his 
neck and kissed him. Bill and I were 
coming so dangerously close to having 
nothing, together ... it mustn't go that 
far. 

He rubbed his cheek against mine, and 
sighed. "Oh, Bert. Let's try to be happy. 
We have so much." 



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95 



"If that show goes to New York, every- 
thing will be all right. I know it, Bill. I 
promise it." 

There was a short silence. Bill bit his 
lip, and feeling the movement against my 
forehead, I stood back. "The only thing 
is . . ." he began. I stiffened, and held my 
breath. "The thing is, Bert, I've got my- 
self into sort of a hole. Remember, I sold 
the show. I've been with it from the be- 
ginning, nursing it along. It's building 
up a swell rating, otherwise the client 
wouldn't be considering this network 
deal, and they feel — Andrews feels, and 
the client, too — well, I might have to go 
with it." 

The moment of tenderness was ripped 
away. The tightness around my heart, 
which had just begun slowly and tenta- 
tively to ease, all at once became a great 
wall of steel armor. I moved quite away 
and pulled my thoughts together. After 
a time I said, "My home is here. And the 
baby's. It'll be quite a day before you get 
me to move away from Los Angeles. And 
that was quite a production you handed 
me. The program coming from New York 
for my sake. Only one small detail — we 
go with it. Where's the deal, Bill? Does 
it make any difference where you hang 
around that woman, whether it's here or 
in another city? What — " 

"Oh, shut up and listen. In the first 
place, I talked myself into this spot on 
account of you, because I was half crazy 
with worrying about trying to separate 
myself from the show and this seemed 
like the best way. I didn't know Andrews 
and the client thought I was so indispen- 
sable to it. I just talked myself into a 
great big hole, and the reason I'm telling 
you is that there's still hope, a little hope, 
I may be able to get out of it, only — well, 
there's a chance I might not. There's a 
chance we just might have to go with it, 
for a while." 

"I am not moving to New York. I am 
not disrupting my whole life for that 
woman, and that's flat." 

"How about for my career?" Bill asked 
morosely. "How about if it means my 
job, Bert? You'd be the last one to give 
up a nice fat job, unless I miss my guess. 
You'd be the last one to want me out on 
my ear, the way you used to be at me all 
the time because I wasn't getting ahead 
fast enough." 

I looked at him, silently. He nodded. 
"That's what it might come to, Bert. An- 
drews practically laid it on the line. He 
can't see it any other way than for me to 
go along with the show." 

For once, I kept my mouth shut. There 
was little point in making childish accusa- 
tions against Bill's good faith, when I 
could see that he was quite sincere. An- 
drews the mighty, Andrews, Bill's boss, 
had spoken, and I was perfectly aware 
that the pronouncement had come as 
shockingly to Bill as it had to me. Con- 
fusion and fear took over. What would 
happen? It was unthinkable that Bill 
should give up his job — that wonderful 
job which had made a new man of him 
and which was providing so comfortably 
for me and Michael. Equally unthinkable 
for us to move away from this town 
where we'd both grown up — where our 
roots and families were, where Michael 
must surely go to school. . . . For once, I 
held my tongue. All I said, very quietly, 
was, "Please do your best, Bill. Make it 
work out the right way." 

I had time during the next couple of 
days for lots of thinking. Even, a little, 
for remorse. If I hadn't shown Bill so 
plainly that I resented his contact with 
Gloria, he might not have worked him- 
m self into this dead-end alley ... if I had 
managed to concentrate on all that was 
happy and promising and good in our 
96 



lives (and surely we did have a lot!) in- 
stead of holding so vengefully to my re- 
membered bitterness and my outworn 
jealousy of that woman. . . . Almost 
timidly, I gauged Bill's temper when he 
came in each night, afraid to ask for news. 
His tension and strain were obvious; in 
the office the situation must be building 
up to a crucial decision. Then on Thurs- 
day he told me he had to go up to San 
Francisco over the weekend, and I knew 
the test had come. He was probably go- 
ing to see the client and try to sell them 
another arrangement for the program — 
try to convince them, perhaps, that an- 
other man from the agency would be just 
as good. It was a sleepless weekend for 
me, uneasy with anxious fears and inde- 
cisive arguments against myself. Sunday 
night, unable to rest, I sat at the window 
in Michael's room, for once unaware of 
his light even breathing. The crisp white 
curtain moved against my warm face 
and I thought unexpectedly of Bill, and 
for the first time in months found myself 
wishing I could help him somehow. If I 
was so anxious, how must he feel? I'll 
be so good to him, I thought, if things 
work out. So different. . . . 

He got in late Monday and called me 
from the airport on his way to the office 
to say he'd be home as soon as he could. 
I kept on hoping . . . but somehow I knew, 
from the carefully neutral way he spoke, 
that it was no good. And when he came 
home in the early evening, tired and quiet 
and closer to hopeless-looking than he'd 
been in months, I knew my apprehension 
was justified. 

"I'd better tell you right away, it's no 
use, Bert. The whole trip was wasted," 
he said, throwing himself into his chair 
and gazing up at me. 

"I figured that was why you went to 
San Francisco— to talk to them about New 
York." 

He shrugged. "Might have saved my- 
self the agony. They hit the ceiling when 
I suggested sending another man along 
with the show. But I talked to Andrews 
again today, Bert, and if you're willing 
there might be one way." He said it so 
unemotionally that at first I didn't realize 
there was hope. Then I jumped. 

"Well, what? If he'll let you get off the 
hook any way — " 

"Don't get your hopes up. Mine aren't." 
He looked at me measuringly. "I said — if 
you're willing. The deal is for me to take 
the show — go with Gloria and Sid to New 
York— and stay just long enough to break 
in somebody else to take over at that end." 

A bitter taste came into my throat. 
"But," I said. "And where does that leave 
me? There you'll be, three thousand miles 
away, with that woman — " 

"And her husband," Bill said, but with- 
out energy. He really didn't expect me 
to yield. I paused, looking at him. But 



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what did he expect? Was he ready to 
give up his job? 

As though my thought telegraphed itself 
to him, he got up, his face flushing dan- 
gerously. "Confound it, I won't be squeezed 
like this," he muttered. "Between you 
and Andy and the almighty client I can't 
call my life my own. Listen to me, Bert. 
What would be so terrible if I did go for 
a month? Is it a tragedy? A month, Bert." 

"Plenty can happen in a month. Es- 
pecially if a woman makes up her mind 
to it." 

"Gloria is married. She and Sid are 
crazy about each other. I'm an old friend. 
I'm interested in her career. Can't you 
get that, without trimmings, through your 
stubborn head?" 

A funny thing was going on inside me. 
I knew Bill was working himself up to 
one last battle; I knew he was prepared 
to have me jeer at him, to take up that 
"old friend" and make something of it, 
to bring up the past, to accuse . . . and 
the words were so familiar that they were 
ready at my lips. But at the same time, 
much deeper down, another feeling stirred 
and strengthened. I did believe him. I 
really did. Why not let go, why not let 
the bitterness and fear dissolve as it 
wanted to in the new warmth of my re- 
lationship with Bill — the relationship that 
might still be saved, still be nursed along 
until we had something good and warm 
and strong again? It would be such a 
relief to relax, to let tenderness and trust 
take over for a change. . . . 

"Bill," I said tremulously, "could you — 
could you promise me that ..." I stopped, 
not knowing how to put it. 

Bill stared at me. Slowly, he came closer 
and searched my eyes. "Bert," he said. 
"Oh, Bert. Don't you know that I am 
different now, not the way I was a year 
ago? Don't you know that I value what 
we have here, our home and Michael, and 
each other, more than anything in the 
world? I can promise you. I feel I could 
promise anything in the world if you were 
prepared to believe my promise. I'd be 
able to do anything, if you weren't con- 
stantly fighting me. Nothing tempts me, 
honey, except maybe the desire to hurt 
you because you're hurting me. If you 
trusted me, Bert, I could go to New York 
and do exactly what I've said — stay a 
month, train a man, come back as fast as 
I possibly could." 

Yes ... I knew what that was, when he 
spoke of the desire to hurt because you'd 
been hurt. I'd been hurt . . . but it was 
over. It was so wearily long ago. I 
thought of the night before when I'd 
wanted to help Bill, when I'd remem- 
bered tenderness and kindness and longed 
for them again. I drew a deep, shaky 
breath. 

"It's all right, Bill," I said. "I think 
everything's all right. You can give me 
the promise." I put my hands on his 
shoulders. "On your terms. Just as you 
said. You go. Butch and I will be here 
when you get back. Even — " I smiled up 
at him. "Even if it's, for instance, six 
weeks, maybe." 

"Bert. . ." Bill's voice was unsteady, 
too. "It's been so long since you've talked 
to me like that. Since you've given me 
a chance. ... I do promise, honey. With 
everything I've got." 

I kissed him, and I didn't say anything. 
But inwardly I, too, was making a 
promise. I would stop keeping it alive, 
this old dead business between my hus- 
band and another woman. I would let 
it lie in peace. I would let trust and 
faith and tenderness push aside the bitter 
memories. It would be like getting a 
present of happiness . . . for Bill, for my- 
self. But mostly for Michael . . . for 
Butch, for our baby. 



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RADIO-TV MIRROR 

Contents 



VOL. 38, NO. 4 



Keystone Edition 



Ann Daggett Higginbotham, Editor Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Editorial Staff: Teresa Buxton, Betty Freedman, Helen Bolstad (Chicago) 

Art Staff: Frances Maly, Joan Clarke 



Fred R. Sammis, Editor-in-Chief 



people on the air 



What's New from Coast to Coast by Jill Warren 6 

Rehearsal Time for Fall Hair-Do's by Harriet Segman 8 

What's Spinning? by Chris Wilson 10 

Spark Up Reducing Meals .-. by Victor H. Lindlahr 14 

Robert Q. Lewis — Eligible Bachelor by Gloria Dulchin 29 

Honeymoon Happiness (Jo Stafford and Paul Weston) 

by Maxine Arnold 32 

I Never Lost the Dream (The Big Pay-Off) by Joan Lobel 34 

The Secret of a Good Life (Jane Pickens) by Martin Cohen 36 

Johnnie Ray's Life Story by Gladys Hall 38 

City Hospital — The Miracle of Love 40 

When the Right Man Comes Along (Doris Day) by Pauline Swanson 42 

Successful Romeo (Jack Barry) by Jack Mahon 54 

The Romance of Helen Trent — Whispering Secrets 56 

My Astonishing Husband (Mel Torme)..... by Candy Toxton Torme 62 

Two Happy People (Mr. and Mrs. Les Tremayne)....by Alice Reinheart 64 
Who's Who in Radio-TV (Larry Robinson — Gerrianne Raphael — 

Gale Gordon — Gloria Gordon) 66 

Bob Poole — Paradise Found by Marie Haller 68 

RTVM Reader Bonus: I Was Too Love Starved 

(The Second Mrs. Burton) by Elizabeth Miller Mason 90 



features in full color 



I Was Nobody's "Dream Girl" by Janette Davis 44 

The Guiding Light of Love (Jone Allison) by Diane Scott 46 

Our Gal Sunday 50 

Reed Hadley — Hero to His Family by Betty Mills 52 

your local station 

E-I-EE-I-0 (WPIX) 12 

Listen Ladies (WEED : 16 

Journey at Dawn (WPEN) 19 

D.C. Cowboy ( WTOP-TV) 26 

inside radio and TV 

Information Booth 4 

Daytime Diary 20 

Inside Radio (program listings) 75 

TV Program Highlights 77 

Cover portrait of Janette Davis by Geoffrey Morris 



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Information 

Ask your questions — 



About Joan 



l), 



Editc 



I like Joan Alexander on radio and TV. 
Could you give me some • information 
about her, where she was born, etc? 

E._ L., Sherman Oaks, Calif. 

Joan Alexander, heard as Althea on. 
The Brighter Day, was born in St. Paul. 
Minnesota. Her father died when she was 
a baby, and Joan's mother took her to 
the family home in Butte, Montana. Six 
years later she came — with her mother 
and step-father — to New York, where she 
attended parochial schools in Brooklyn 
and Brentwood, Long Island. Ever since 
she was a child, Joan wanted to be an 
actress, but her family did everything to 
discourage her. Even though she suc- 
ceeded in getting a part in a Broadway 
play when she was seventeen, her step- 
father persuaded her to go to Europe for 
a year to forget the theatre. But across 
the Atlantic, no matter how hard she 
tried. Joan could not escape the lure of 
seeing pbays and meeting theatre folk. 
She returned to New York more deter- 
mined than ever before. Soon after her 
return, Joan decided to try her luck in 
Hollywood, but a serious auto accident 
marred her hopes. It was the friendship 
of actress Madeleine Carroll that saw her 
through, and gave her new hope. In radio. 
Joan had her hopes realized and forged 
a new career for herself. Married to a 
surgeon, Joan has one daughter, Jane, 
aged five. 

Theme Songs 

Dear Editor: 

Will you please give me the name and 
the composer of the theme song of FBI 
in Peace and War? I know it is a Russian 
classical n\arch. 

N. D., New Orleans, La. 

You are correct, the theme is a march 
by the noted Russian composer, Prokofi- 
eff, from his opera "Love of Three Or- 




Joan Alexander 



Booth 



we'll try to find the answers 



Dear Editor: 

What is the theme music for the TV 
program, Mama? 

C. R., Red Hook, New York. 

The Mama theme is "Sarabande." from 
the Holberg Suite of Grieg. 

Frankie's A Producer 

Dear Editor: 

Could you tell me if Elliott Lewis, who 
takes the part of Frankie Remley on the 
Phil Harris — Alice Faye show, is the 
same Elliott Lewis who produces Sus- 
pense on the radio? 

I. H., West Medford, Mass. 

Yes, Elliott the producer and Elliott the 
actor are the same versatile guy. Lewis 
also writes many of the original scripts 
used on the Suspense program. He is 
married to Cathy Lewis — Jane, on My 
Friend Irma. 

Big Sister's Husband 

Dear Editor: 

Is the woman who plays Big Sister 
married? 

E. S„ Big Indian, New York. 

Grace Matthews, star of Big Sister, is 
married to Court Benson. Mr. Benson has 
acted in the program's cast as an elderly 
friend of the family. 

The Bensons have one child, a daughter. 
Andrea, aged four. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— If there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
Radio-TV Mirror, 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y. We'll answer, if we can, 
provided your question is of general in- 
terest. Ansivers will appear in this column 
— but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter, and specify whether your question 
concerns radio or TV. 




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Talking to a full-size photo of John Derek, this 
Ralph Edwards Show contestant sees it come to life! 




Frances Shore's no relation to Dinah Shore, but 
she "stands in" for her while TV lights are tested. 




Stuart Erwin and wife June Collyer sign 
in at Dr. Christian's "birthday" party. 



red Allen will soon be back in television, 
"and in a big way. He's all set to do a brand- 
new show early this fall called Two For The 
Money, and believe it or not, it's a comedy 
quiz. Allen, you may remember, definitely 
stated his dislike for audience - participation 
entertainment a few years back when Stop The 
Music outrated his Sunday night program, 
with his program going off the air shortly 
thereafter. Fred's television set-up will find 
him interviewing contestants a la Groucho 
Marx, with the emphasis on laughs, of course, 
and his wife Portland Hoffa will be among 
those present. Two For The Money will be 
a half -hour show on both NBC and NBC -TV— 
probably a "simulcast" (radio and TV versions 
broadcast simultaneously) . 

When the Jack Benny troupe returns to the 
airlanes soon, Phil Harris and his band Will 
not be in the cast. After a long-time associa- 
tion, Phil and Benny severed relations, though 
on a friendly basis, and Harris and his wife, 
Alice Faye, signed a new deal with NBC. Bob 
Crosby and his orchestra have been tabbed 
for the Harris spot, with Bob promised plenty 
of ribbing from Benny. Crosby's contract per- 




Florida family: Martha Raye, with her 
husband, Nick Condos, daughter Melodye. 



Big celebration for Dr. Christian: Jean Hersholt 
greets Eva Gabor and her mother, Mme. Jolie Gabor. 



mits him to do other shows, so he'll still be 
heard on his Club 15 program on CBS. 

Remember The Life of Riley and William 
Bendix' wonderful characterization as Riley? 
This series, which was so popular at one time, 
is coming back on the air in a few weeks, 
both on television and radio, with Bendix once 
again starred in his original role. The program 
will broadcast from Hollywood so Bendix can 
fill his movie commitments. 

Comedian Jerry Lester and NBC, who were 
about to have legal bouts over Lester's con- 
tract — which was giving him a salary, but no 
work — settled their differences with the tele- 
vision program, Saturday Night Dance Party. 
Lester is featured, along with a different name 
band each week and variety acts and soloists. 
Though only set for the summer, to occupy 
part of the time used by the vacationing Show 
of Shows, there is a chance Jerry will get a 
permanent spot of his own if he proves popular 
with viewers. 

Walter Winchell, who has been off the air 
because of doctors' orders, returns soon with 
his news flashes and rapid-fire chatter. His 
program may be (Continued on page 24) 




Keeping fit for Your Hit Parade: Dorothy Collins 
and Sue Bennett study dancing with Tony Charmoli. 




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Rehearsal time for FALL 




Lovely Anne Sargent, TV star of The 
First Hundred Years, starts early to 
coach her topknot for a starring role 



* 



First things you notice about Anne 
Sargent are her sparkling green 
eyes, infectious laugh and smooth, 
shiny, dark brown hair. While items 
one and two may be chalked up to 
blessings gratefully received, Anne 
can take a very personal bow in the 
crowning-glory department. 

Personal life has cast her in the 
same role she played in the CBS-TV 
daytime serial, The First Hundred 
Years — that of a slightly new and very 
busy bride. But, in spite of her heavy 
schedule, hair care stands high on her 
cannot-do-without list. Especially 
after a summer of fun in the sun, sand 
and sea. 

If your sun-summered topknot is 



decidedly not the thing of beauty 
you're looking forward to under a new 
fall bonnet, why not steal a march 
on the weatherman now and break 
into Anne's routine along with her? 

Brunettes, especially, take note. 
Because summer-sun bleaching can 
badly damage your tresses without 
your knowing it. The sun doesn't 
lighten your hair as it does .your 
blonde sisters'. Blissful ignorance of 
its true condition might mean dull, 
brittle hair at just the time you want 
to try a new hair-do and home per- 
manent. 

First step in Anne's hair condition- 
ing system is to reach for a hair 
brush — medium stiff, with natural 




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HAIR-DO'S 



bristles. Using long, sweeping strokes, 
she brushes her hair up and away 
from her head, then smoothes it into 
place with extra polishing strokes. 

Brushing stimulates the oil glands 
and spreads the oil evenly through 
your hair. Think of it as the exercise 
you give your hair. And don't be 
stingy with your strokes. The tradi- 
tional 100-strokes-a-day is minimum 
for Anne. 

You needn't fear that frequent 
washing will make your dry hair 
brittle or hard to manage. Anne 
shampoos as often as necessary to 
keep her hair scrupulously clean, 
making sure, of course, that she uses 
a mild shampoo — lotion, cream, castile 
or special dry-hair preparation. And 
making extra sure to rinse, rinse, 
rinse like mad until every speck of 
dirt and lather has been whisked 
away. 

The wind-up is a luxurious cream 
rinse that leaves her hair silky soft 
and easy to manage. She dissolves 
a tablespoon of rinse in a cup of warm 
water and works it thoroughly into 
her hair with her hands. Then rinses 
lightly with clear water. 

If your hair has reached the S.O.S. 
stage of dryness here's a sure-fire 
treatment to coax it quickly back to 
normal: Measure out hair rinse in 
the proportion stated above and work 
it thoroughly into your hair. Now 
apply a steaming towel to your head, 
turban-wise, and allow it to cool. Use 
two more steaming towels, then rinse 
your hair in warm, not cool, water. 
We think you'll be amazed at the 
immediate improvement in the texture 
of your hair. 

If, like Anne, you're planning on a 
new fall hair-do, get professional help 
with the cutting and shaping. But 
don't hesitate to give yourself a home 
permanent. Even on sun-bleached 
hair you can achieve a soft, natural 
curl with the permanents especially 
designed for very gentle action. 

For a finishing touch, spray your 
head lightly with a non-sticky prepa- 
ration that will control your hair like 
an invisible net. (If you haven't yet 
tried this, you're in for an exciting 
discovery. It's the secret of that 
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— has a new disc out which should be on your "must-get" list. 




WHAT'S 



Music's "ideal marriage" went on the 
rocks, when, after only three weeks, 
beautiful Roberta Peters announced 
that she would seek a parting of the ways 
from Robert Merrill. Fans of the two couldn't 
have been more disappointed for, ever since 
the announcement of their engagement on 
TV's Toast of the Town when the two ap- 
peared there together, excitement had 
mounted. Thousands jammed the streets at 
New York's Park Avenue Synagogue where 
the marriage ceremony was performed. Per- 
sonalities aside, however, no criticism can be 
given of the "Cavalcade of Musical Comedy" 
which Merrill has just recorded with Rise 
Stevens for Victor. We particularly liked 
"If I Loved You," from the musical comedy 
"Carousel," which is in the album. Mr. Mer- 
rill's marriage may have hit a sour note, but 
his voice hasn't. 

Archie Levington, husband of radio and 
TV's Fran Allison, had a little tough sledding 
for a few days when "Junco Partner" was 
barred from the disc jockeys' airings. Ban- 
ning of the tune was brought about when it 
was supposed that the Junco title referred 
to the use of narcotics. Since Junco merely 
means "worthless man" in Cajun, the tune 
was reinstated to the airwaves. By now, 
practically everyone is intrigued with the 
Richard Hayes Mercury recording of the 
song. 

The record business has been singing the 
blues in many directions, with record sales 
off this year — everything from television to 
the weather is blamed! However, a hit is 
still a hit and, right now, Doris Day is fair- 
haired for more than the reason that she's 
a blonde. Her "A Guy Is A Guy" is being 
followed by "When I Fall In Love," the 
theme melody from RKO's picture, "One 
Minute to Zero." We liked it — maybe be- 
cause the man who wrote the lyrics to "Body 
and Soul," Eddie Heyman, did a superb job 
on these. The other side is "Take Me In 
Your Arms," vintage 1932. 

Funny how show people are always sup- 
posed to kick people when they are down but 
— like so many other truisms — it just is not 
so. When Frank Sinatra came into New 
York at the Paramount, all the disc jockeys 
in the New York area put on a campaign to 
get people to the theatre. Now the whole 
deejay trade is behind his "Luna Rossa" 
(Blushing Moon), which is backed by "Ten- 
nessee Newsboy." Like the newsboy in the 
latter song, who has to sell his papers to buy 
some jelly beans, Frank had to make a big 
comeback to keep his former wife, Nancy, 
and the kids in jelly beans — and his present 
wife Ava Gardner in the style to which she 
has become accustomed. Show people are 



10 




G? 




By CHRIS WILSON 



helping. More power to all concerned! 

P.F.C. Vic Damone, Mercury's recording 
artist, is now on report to First Army Com- 
mand at Fort Jay, New York. He's recorded 
an official song for the U. S. Women's Air 
Force, a marching song written by Jules 
Styne and Adolf Conden at the request of 
Anna Rosenberg, Asst. Secretary of Defense. 
Mercury is releasing and promoting it, with 
all monies going to the United States Air 
Force. 

Four unreleased Duke Ellington sides 
which were recorded way back in 1945, after 
Ellington's now-famous jazz concerts at 
Carnegie Hall, are just coming out on the 
Victor label. The four parts comprise a 
composition entitled "The Perfume Suite." 

We've come to like Les Paul and wife Mary 
Ford's work more and more, and their latest, 
"I'm Confessin' " and "Carioca," is real-fun 
listening. Perhaps the touching torch qual- 
ity of Mary comes through even more when 
you realize that behind the success of these 
two there is a real heartbreak yarn. Les ex- 
perimented for eleven years, studying elec- 
tronics, building special guitars until he 
finally could play an entire orchestra of 
guitars — all handled by Les Paul. His feet 
were on the threshold of success, when, 
shortly after his first recording of "Lover" 
and "Brazil," he was injured in an Oklahoma 
auto accident. For two years he couldn't 
play his beloved guitar. Finally, through 
sheer will power, he overcame his handicap. 
Then he married Mary Ford. Together they 
played little night clubs, sang in out-of-the- 
way places. When they'd come home from 
work, they'd get out their home-recording 
outfit and go to work perfecting their instru- 
mental numbers and vocals. Then came 
"How High the Moon," and they began their 
phenomenal rise to popularity, selling over 
six million records last year. A little of that 
heartbreak and soul must have crept into 
music that is responded to by so many! 

Odds 'n' Ends: 

Eddie Fisher and Perry Como have gotten 
together to do "Watermelon Weather" and 
"Maybe" — "WW" is by Hoagy Carmichael. 
The double platter of "Mad About the Boy" 
and "I Can't Face the Music," sung by Dinah 
Washington, has the "George" kids in our 
neighborhood wearing out our turntable. 
Rudy Vallee has them giggling but liking the 
songs, "The Beer That I Left Behind Me" and 
"Bubbles In My Beer." They sip Cokes and 
pop their bubble gum and can't understand 
why this should remind anyone of the 
"Maine Stein Song," obviously a million 
years old. Al Martino's "Take My Heart" 



had them spinning more than ever when 
they finally saw a picture of him. "Why," 
shrieked one little monster, "he's the 
man who was on Arthur Godfrey's Tal- 
ent Scouts. He was good!" Yes, he was 
good — he was Godfrey's guest for seven 
weeks. Right now Martino's in Holly- 
wood and, if the monster's reaction was 
any indication, should be in the movies. 
He's married and has one son, which 
didn't seem to dull the monster's en- 
thusiastic response to his recording one 
whit. 

Take Your Choice: 

"Lovely To Look At" from MGM has 
been recorded in album form by three 
different companies. You can get MGM's 
sound-track version, a Gordon MacRae- 
Lucille Norman version by Capitol Rec- 
ords under the original title of "Ro- 
berta," or Columbia's presentation of the 
score sung by a cast headed by Joan 
Roberts and Jack Cassidy. We just liked 
listening to the old Jerome Kern's music 
so much we didn't stop to judge one 
against the other. (Cont'd on page 13) 



Barbara Ruick — MGM recorder guesting with deejay Alex Cooper — is 
the daughter of actress Lurene Tuttle and her ex-husband, Mel Ruick. 




11 



Doral's Performer, Ted's prize Guernsey bull is worth $25,000. 




WPIX's Ted Steele relaxes in the den. 



Ee-i-Ee-i-0 



w, 



ith a baa-baa here — actually, one-hundred-and-fifty sheep 
provide quite a few baas — on Ted Steele's four-hundred-acre farm 
in New Hope, Pennsylvania. Ted and his wife Doris are two 
Broadway folks who< decided to carry the traditional city-slicker 
dream one step further. They really bought that pi-overbial farm in 
the country. What's more, they really work on it. As Ted says, 
"I'm no checkbook farmer." 

Doris and Ted had a farm in mind ever since they were married 
in 1940. She was then a busy advertising account executive, and 
Ted was getting his start with NBC. At one time, it looked as 
though the Steeles were trying to corner the money market, what 
with their Chesterfield Supper Club going strong on one network, 
Mr. and Mrs. Music on WMCA, and Ted's WPIX stint. But now 
Doris is a homebody, and Ted is content with his Monday through 
Friday WPIX-TV show. You can't keep either of them on 
Broadway — since they've been down on the farm. 





12 



Ted and Doris on the path leading to Celebrity Farm, their 400-acre dream come true. 



? 



What's Spinning? 



Single Records You Should Get: 

If you own 10, you're "George" in our 
neighborhood: 8, your collection's going; 
6, bubble gum and pop may satisfy your 
stomach but won't add a thing to the 
popularity of your phonograph. 

1. "I'm Yours," Eddie Fisher on Vic- 
tor, or- — if you prefer combos — 
Four Aces for Decca. 

2. "I'm Confessin' " and "Carioca," 
with Les Paul and Mary Ford for 
Capitol. Even the older genera- 
tion will listen to this. 

3. "Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart," 
sung by Vera Lynn for London. Al- 
ready a Continental favorite. 
Champ Butler has recorded it for 
Columbia, too. 

4. "I'm Sorry," by Bobby Wayne for 
Mercury. We're sorry for you if 
you haven't bought it. 

5. "Plinlc, Plank, Plunk"— take your 
pick of Three Suns for Victor, 
Owen Bradley for Coral, Leroy 
Anderson for Decca. 

6. "Lover," with Peggy Lee and 
George Jenkins for Decca. 

7. "Cling To Me," a lovely melody 
by Jane Froman on a Capitol disc. 
Her courage was so high, and her 
voice is so good. 

8. "High Noon," from the Stanley 
Kramer Western film by the same 
name, with Frankie Laine for Co- 
lumbia records. "Rock of Gibral- 
tar's" on the other side and it's 
cute, as you full well know. 

9. "Break the Bonds That Bind Me" 
and, other side, "More or Less" — 
with Tony Bavaar and Hugo Win- 
terhalter's Orchestra. For Victor. 

10. "Half As Much," with Rosemary 
Clooney for Columbia. You know 
Clooney and you'll like her "half 
as much" again on this record. 




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THESE DIET TIPS CAN 
TEMPT THE APPETITE— 

WITHOUT ADDING WEIGHT 



By VICTOR H. LINDLAHR 



<^* ( oor Eloise, don't you feel sorry 
for her?" a friend remarks. 
"She's dieting, eating all those dull 
foods. Eloise must be perfectly mis- 
erable." 

Eloise is not feeling sorry for her- 
self — unless she enjoys self-pity. A 
reducing diet can be as stimulating, 
as exciting and as imaginative as the 
woman who prepares the meals. 
Unfortunately, there are still many 
people who misunderstand, who 
think a diet must taste like medicine 
to be effective. That's nonsense. A 
housewife who is clever in the 
kitchen can serve an entire low- 
calorie meal to guests and they won't 
even know the difference. But, to 
be practical, let's see what can be 
done to standard reducing dishes to 
make them extra flavorful. 

• Take the glorified hamburger, ex- 
cellent for dieting when the meat is 
fat-trimmed before grinding. For 
variation, fold a slice of sweet Ber- 
muda onion in the center before the 
meat goes under the broiler. Do you 
like garlic flavor? If so, add a bit of 
minced garlic to your steakburger 
before cooking. 

For another change, take a tip 
from a famous restaurateur: Broil a 
slice of tomato on top — this you put 
on, of course, after the patty has 
been turned. 



• When dieting, all meats and fish 
should be broiled. But you can have, 
for example, sauteed green pepper 
and onion with broiled meats, for as 
little as forty-two calories. They are 
particularly good with broiled liver. 
Thin-slice half a green pepper and 
half a medium-sized onion, cook just 
until soft and then saute in a small 
pan with a scant teaspoon of butter. 

Or perhaps you want mushrooms 
with your chicken. That's easy and 
the calorie content of this delicacy 
is negligible. The trick is in low- 
calorie cooking. Merely brush a 
little melted butter over the mush- 
rooms, broil cap-side-up for two 
minutes, then turn and broil seven 
minutes longer until mushrooms are 
tender. 

• Take other good reducing dishes. 
Fish, for one, is most delicious when 
covered generously with lemon and 
parsley before broiling — that's the 
way gourmets prefer theirs. Sea ■ 
foods, highly recommended when 
dieting, are served with a chili sauce, 
spiked with horseradish, in the fin- 
est restaurants. 

And that old standby, cottage 
cheese, doesn't have to be bland. If 
you dice in celery, fresh green pep- 
per, parsley, minced onions . . . sea- 
son lightly with salt, pepper and 
paprika . . . surround the whole with 



Mea 



sliced cucumber and radish, and 
serve on a leaf of lettuce . . . you're 
satisfying that old devil appetite and 
helping to slenderize your hips. 

• The egg, with its high protein con- 
tent, is a mainstay on any diet. 
Poached, soft and hard-cooked eggs 
get tiresome after a while, so change 
to scrambled eggs. The problem is 
in cooking them with the least 
amount of grease. You can do this 
by using a small, heavy skillet and 
just a dab of butter. Cook very 
slowly over low heat, scraping eggs 
from bottom of pan as they cook, to 
prevent their becoming hard and 
dry. 

• To enhance side dishes, such as 
vegetables, learn how to combine 
cooked vegetables. A few good com- 
binations are: Minted peas; sauer- 
kraut and apples; parsnips and po- 
tato; scalloped corn and tomatoes; a 
little chopped onion with peas. 

When properly prepared, potatoes 
are not so calorific as you may think. 
Look at what can be done with half 
a medium-sized spud. After baking, 
hollow out the shell. Then mix the 
potato with skimmed milk, minced 
onion, seasoning and chopped pars- 
ley, sprinkle with paprika, stuff back 
into the shell and place under broiler 
for a moment or two. Crown the 
potato with criss-cross strips of pi- 
miento before serving. It's good for 
you and amounts to only forty 
calories. 

There is hardly any limit to what 
can be done to make reducing meals 
fit for the most discriminating eater. 
There are dozens of herbs, absolute- 
ly fat-free, which open up endless 
variations in tastes. Any good cook 
can serve up a tasty reducing meal. 
So be smart. Learn how to enjoy 
your reducing diet! 



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16 



Listen 
adies 



to Priscilla Fortescue 



WW herever there are people 
doing things — not necessarily big 
names, but just folks — Priscilla 
Fortescue is there with her tape 
recorder, introducing them to 
"just folks" in Boston. For more 
than twelve years now, she's 
been entertaining the women — 
men, too — in the Hub City with 
anecdotes about famous people 
and places, and interviews with 
big and little people. 

As with most show people, 
Priscilla has had her share of 
tough breaks on the road to suc- 
cess, but the one thing she has 
always maintained is her regard 
for people and her interest in 
their doings. Her previous show, 
Listen Ladies, was concerned 
mainly with introducing stage 
and screen greats to the after- 
noon housewife -listeners. But 
radio changes like anything else, 
and now the Priscilla Fortescue 
Show has moved out of the stu- 
dio — the world is its oyster. Last 
summer, Boston listeners met 
people at Blarney Castle, Shan- 
non Airport, the Tower of Lon- 
don, Scotland Yard, the Paris 
boulevards, with Priscilla as go- 
between. In her own small way, 
she felt that these talks with 
Europeans might bring the one- 
world ideal a little closer to 
reality, by providing a bridge of 
understanding to connect both 
sides of the Atlantic. 

When Priscilla went to Wash- 
ington, she took Bostonians along 
via tape. She talked to senators, 
bureau heads, and Government 
officials in a frank manner, ques- 
tioning them on things in general 




WEEI's Priscilla Fortescue chats with ventriloquist, Edgar Bergen. 




Roger Dann, Priscilla, and Guy Lombardo dining on the town in the Hub. 



and matters concerning Boston 
in particular. But, while a talk 
with a senator is important, Pris- 
cilla feels that Mrs. Joe Doakes 
is important in her own right. 

Although her program takes 
her far afield of Boston, and de- 
mands a great deal of her time, 
Priscilla has managed to lead a 
normal, happy home life. Wisely, 
she insists on her family's wel- 
fare and comfort before her 
career. She is an interested and 



understanding mother to her son 
and daughter, and spends all of 
her free time in her Back Bay 
apartment, or on the family farm 
in New Hampshire — doing the 
things any good housewife is ex- 
pected to do. And Priscilla For- 
tescue would be the first to admit 
that her success in radio would 
be a very empty thing, indeed, if 
it were not accompanied by the 
only real success a woman must 
have — a happy home. 



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HEMISTS • SPRINGFIELD ) MASSACHUSETTS 

FRANCISCO ■ OTTAWA CANADA 



J 



ourney 



at d 



awn 




*r? 



Each stop-off, even his service station, is 
a fan-mail depot for Del Parks of WPEN. 



I t's twenty miles from Chester, Pennsylvania, to 
■ Philadelphia, and every piece of the road between 
the two cities is as familiar to Del Parks as his 
own back yard. Del makes the trek every day at 
4: 00 A.M. — driving through a gauntlet of salutes 
from blinking highway police headlights, airport 
control-tower blinkers, and even occasional 
kitchen lights along the highway — to open up shop 
at Station WPEN in the City of Brotherly Love. 

A modern Pony Express rider, Del stops to pick up 
his personal mail at the post office, stops again to 
pick up local news items from district reporters 
and police blotters, sometimes is hailed by a listener 
who tells him of a blessed event or some other 
piece of neighborhood news. The last detour on the 
road into Philadelphia is at the International Airport 
for a personal look at the weather maps and a chat 
with his friends in the flight-control tower. Almost 
every stopping-off place finds bundles of mail 
waiting for Del from folks who know his route. Some 
are requests for music; some, proposals for 
dedications; and there are always a few bulletin-board 
items from local civic or religious groups, 
announcing functions. 

A native of Chester, Del has spent half of his life 
in radio, and has performed every conceivable 
task in the industry — short of owning a station. In 
addition to his early morning (6:00 to 9:00 A.M.) 
program. Del is rarely working less than two TV shows 
weekly, and makes on the average of three extra 
appearances a week as a guest on sports 
shows or before civic groups. 

Del's attitude towards his program can best be 
summed up in his own words, "Too many folks listen 
to the program for me to decide what to use on 
the air. Long ago I decided to let my listeners 
do my programming for me — and they do." 




Debbie (who calls herself "Tex"), Barry and Steve share their dad's enthusiasm for fishing. 



19 




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D aytime 
diar y 



AUNT JENNY How close should a man 
come to being his brother's keeper? Aunt 
Jenny watched sympathetically the disrup- 
tion of the home life of Dick and Amy 
Rowan, when Dick's ne'er-do-well brother 
Jerry not only moved in with them, but 
brought in a wife as well. However, as 
Aunt Jenny told of the Rowans' problem 
in one of her recent stories, it turned out 
to have a most surprising conclusion, M-F, 
12:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



BACKSTAGE WIFE Even though Ru- 
pert Barlow's long-range plan to break up 
Mary Nob^'s marriage has failed, and 
Mary has called off her divorce from Larry, 
the Nobles are not completely reconciled. 
Mary still wonders how Larry was involved 
with his leading lady, Edith Venable. And 
Larry is still not certain whether Mary left 
him to start divorce proceedings or merely 
to run off with Barlow. Will the rift widen? 
M-F, 4:00 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



BIG SISTEB Ruth Wayne's brother 
Neddie can no longer complain that he 
never gets the breaks. He is still stunned 
by the fortune that came to him on the 
death of his middle-aged, dearly loved 
friend, Selina. Neddie is determined that 
Ruth and her husband, Dr. John Wayne, 
must reap some benefit from his good for- 
tune. But as for what it is all going to 
mean to Neddie himself . . . well, it's too 
soon for anyone, even Ruth, to predict. 
M-F, 1 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



BRIGHTER DAY Althea Dennis, beau- 
tiful and talented, has always been good 
at believing just what she wished to believe 
about herself, and discounting the things 
that seemed unflattering. But since the 
accident which left her a wheel-chair con- 
valescent, her family and young Dr. Holden 
have made it hard for her to remain quite 
so self-indulgent. Will Althea be forced 
to admit that her selfishness may wreck 




Larry Race's happiness? M-F, 2:45 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. M-F, 9:30 A.M. EDT, NBC. 



DOCTOR'S WIFE Julie Palmer is much 
disturbed when her husband, Dr. Daniel 
Palmer, comes to grips with wealthy Mrs. 
Irwin over a matter of principle. Dan's 
colleagues at the hospital are overjoyed at 
Mrs. Irwin's generous offer to build a new 
wing, but Dan refuses to accept a post 
there because of Mrs. Irwin's specifications 
about who may and who may not be ad- 
mitted. Will her shockingly undemocratic 
ideas prevail? M-F, 5:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



FRONT PAGE FARRELL When a 
penniless young couple of somewhat shady 
background, known to be living consider- 
ably beyond their means, are involved in 
the death of a wealthy woman acquaint- 
ance, it's easy for the police to start build- 
ing a case. But when star reporter David 
Farrell is assigned to "The Carefree Lov- 
ers' Murder Case," he quickly unearths 
some facts about the dead woman that 
make the case far less simple. M-F, 5:15 
P.M. EDT, NBC. 



GUIDING LIGHT How far does one life 
really influence another? Does Meta's past 
really determine the course being taken by 
her stubborn young stepdaughter, Kathy 
Roberts, even though Meta is now unoffi- 
cially separated from Joe Roberts, Kathy 's 
father? Or is it more likely, as Joe has 
tried to convince his wife, that Kathy 
would have maHe her mistakes even if 
Meta's path had never touched hers? M-F, 
1:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



HILLTOP HOUSE Neither Reed Nixon 
nor Dr. Jeff Browning has any real claim 
on Julie Paterno so she is half amused, 
half annoyed to realize that both are jealous 
to the point of irritation over her friend- 
ship with Jeff's younger brother. The rival- 



ry between the brothers isn't helping the 
situation along either, for Jeff's mentally- 
ill wife Nina has reacted unfortunately to 
the obvious emotional strain. M-F, 3 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 



JUST PLAIN BILL Certain rhat Amy 
Brooks's mother was ruining the girl's life 
by interfering with her romance with 
Ralph Chadwick, Bill Davidson in all sin- 
cerity tried to bring the two young people 
together. But he did not anticipate that 
his well-meant efforts would climax in 
near-tragedy. Was Amy's mother right all 
along? Is there any hope for the eventual 
happiness of the ill-starred young couple? 
M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



LIFE CAN BE BEAUTIFUL For a 

long time Papa David has watched affec- 
tionately as his young adopted daughter, 
Chichi, fell in and out of what might have 
been love, but was never quite the real 
thing. Now at last he recognizes in Martin 
Walker the right man for Chichi — or at 
any rate, Chichi does, and that's enough 
.for Papa David. But as it turns out that 
Martin is really Martin Vandenbush, Papa 
David wonders what's ahead. M-F, 3 P.M. 
EDT, NBC. 



LONE JOUBNEY Lansing McKenzie 
started out on a solitary vacation, deter- 
mined that it was really going to become a 
separation from his wife Sidney, who, he 
believes, is in love with Wolfe Bennett. But 
his stop-off to visit his friend Jack O'Neill 
may have a decisive effect on that plan. 
And back home Sidney herself has made 
a decision about Wolfe that surprises even 
herself. M-F, 11 A.M. EDT, ABC. 



LOBENZO JONES Lorenzo's million- 
dollar buried treasure turned out to be 
stolen loot hidden by an international 
jewel thief, so the discovery did nobody 
any good. Belle, Lorenzo's wife, who was 
really responsible for the thief's capture, 
allowed Lorenzo to get the credit for it, 
but not even the glory makes up to Lorenzo 
for the million that got away. As always, 
he's sure the next idea he gets will be the 
real thing. M-F. 5:30 P.M.. EDT. NBC. 



MA PEBKINS Mathilda Pendleton's 
divorce action against banker Augustus 
Pendleton has really stirred things up. Ma 
has taken an unswerving stand on the side 
of Augustus and Amy McKenzie, in spite 
of Rushville Center's natural horror at 
what appears to be a scandalous triangle — 
for Ma knows the true facts. But she's 
wondering how to help the Pendletons' 
daughter Gladys, who might fall in love 
with young Joseph — if she believed in love. 
M-F. 1:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



OUll GAL SUN BAY Sunday and her 
husband. Lord Henry Brinthrope, wonder 
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21 




Don't be dismayed if the "monthly" 
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22 




Daytime Diary 



ss^*^ Accepted for Advertising 

by the Journal of the American Medical Association 



Fairbrooke of their old friend, Judge Hor- 
ace Reeves. Is it possible that the distin- 
guished judge is guilty of a hit-run crime 
the consequences of which he is trying to 
escape? Or is it his daughter Mar go, or 
his foster son, Douglas Clarke, who was 
driving the family car when the accident 
occurred? M-F, 12:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



PEPPER YOUNG'S FAMILY The ac- 
cident that came within inches of taking 
Pepper's life will have a fundamental 
effect on his future and that of Linda, his 
wife. For during Pepper's delirium, Linda 
learned of thoughts she had never dreamed 
went through her husband's mind — 
thoughts and fears that could not help but 
throw a revealing new light on their entire 
relationship. M-F, 3:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



PERKY MASON Jewel thieves are nat- 
urally daring, or they would be in some 
other line of work. But one would think 
a jewel as conspicuous as the Blazing 
Heart wouldn't interest any but the most 
foolhardy thief. However, by the time 
Perry Mason picks up the trail of the 
organization that so shrewdly profits from 
lonely folks' need to talk, he is ready to 
call it anything but foolhardy. Formidable 
may prove to be a better word. M-F, 2:15 
P.M. EDT, CBS. 



RIGHT TO HAPPINESS Miles Nel- 
son's career and his position as governor 
may survive the treacherous attack of his 
enemies, but his relationship with his wife, 
Carolyn, is another and more subtle mat- 
ter. Annette Thorpe's campaign against 
Carolyn is a shrewd one, and in some way 
Miles himself has altered under the pres- 
sures of his important public office. Caro- 
lyn is worried, too, over the precarious 
state of Miles's health. M-F, 3:45 P.M. 
EDT, NBC. 



ROAU OF LIFE Conrad Overton has 
fought long and bitterly to protect his po- 
sition gained by trickery and worse, but 
with Dr. Jim Brent and newspaperman 
Frank Dana working tirelessly to destroy 
him, even Overton suspects that the hand- 
writing is already on the wall for him. In 
some ways he will be almost relieved when 
the complete truth about himself and his 
fortune is finally revealed. M-F, 3:15 P.M. 
EDT, NBC. 



ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT Has 

the campaign waged by her enemies to 
destroy the reputation of Hollywood gown 
designer Helen Trent been successful? 
Both of her admirers seem less attentive 



lately. Barclay Bailey, convinced by his 
parents' clever maneuvering that Helen 
was indifferent to his long illness, decides 
to return to Philadelphia — never see her 
again. And lawyer Gil Whitney, whom 
Helen loves, seems strangely remote. M-F, 
12:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



ROSEMARY Because Bill Roberts is on 
trial for the murder of Blanche Weatherby, 
two girls who knew neither of these people 
have had an astounding adventure they 
will never forget — being held prisoner in 
their own apartment by Eddie Miles, who 
does know more about the murder than 
he wants anyone — especially the police — to 
find out. What was behind the blackmail 
Miles collected from Blanche's neurotic 
mother? M-F, 11:45 A.M. EDT, CBS. 



SECOND MRS. RVRTON Michael 
Dalton, new manager of Stan Burton's 
store, is a clever man, but he has made 
what may prove to be a fatal error. He 
has taken Terry Burton for an inexperi- 
enced housewife whose only interests are 
her home and family. Naturally preoccu- 
pied during Stan's serious illness, Terry 
hasn't had time to investigate. But sooner 
or later she is going to notice something 
very odd in the store's affairs. M-F, 2 P.M. 
EDT. CBS. 



STELLA DALLAS Knowing that young 
secretary Emily Calvert is in love with her 
wealthy boss, Jared Sloane, Stella tries to 
encourage the girl. But all her plans stop 
abruptly with the sudden mysterious death 
of Muriel Drake, with whom Jared had 
been infatuated. Is it possible that Emily, 
a former schoolmate of Stella's own daugh- 
ter Laurel, has anything to do with the 
tragic and mysterious circumstances of 
Muriel's death? M-F, 4:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



THIS IS NORA DRAKE Nurse Nora 
Drake is shocked and unnerved when the 
district attorney outlines the case that has 
been built up against her in the death of 
her friend Peg Martinson. Knowing her 
own innocence, she cannot believe she and 
Fred Molina will be unable to prove it, 
but when she learns that Dorothy Steward, 
who could have established her alibi, died 
in a crash out West, Nora begins to under- 
stand what real panic can be. M-F, 2:30 
P.M. EDT, CBS. 



WENDY WARREN It will be a tragic 
milestone in Wendy's life if Mark Douglas 
continues to believe himself unfit to marry 
her, for during the last few months she has 
finally realized that her complete happiness 



lies within him. Will she ever get over 
blaming herself for Mark's distressing Hol- 
lywood escapade? Is it true that if she had 
married him when he urged it. Maggie 
Fallon would have caused no trouble? 
Or — would it have happened anvway? 
M-F. 12 Noon EDT, CBS. 



WUEN A GIRL MARRIES Joan 
Davis has come to Paris almost convinced 
that there is no hope for her marriage. But 
seeing the successful understanding be- 
tween her sister Sylvia and her brother-in- 
law Chick, whose marriage was even closer 
to the rocks than her own, Joan wonders 
if there isn't a sign here to revive her own 
faith in herself and Harry. What part will 
Dr. Brady play in Joan's Paris adventure? 
M-F, 11:15 A.M. EDT, ABC. 



WOMAN IX MY HOUSE James and 
Jessie Carter, remembering a recent un- 
fortunate experience w r ith a new son-in-law, 
are wary about trying to help when their 
daughter Virginia plans to marry. But 
when Jessie finds the perfect house for 
Stan and Virginia, she cannot resist at 
least exposing them to it. Will Virginia 
learn through her family the answers to 
some of her questions about Stan? M-F, 
4:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



YOUNG DR. MALONE The pressure 
applied by Ray Gillette at the Springfield 
plant finally tells. Sam Williams is deter- 
mined to stick it out as plant manager no 
matter how obviously Gillette is intriguing 
against him. But Sam's son Gene sees this 
as cowardice, not courage. Can Anne Ma- 
lone and Gene's wife Crystal keep Sam 
and Gene from a serious quarrel? M-F, 
1:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. M-F, 9:45 A.M. 
EDT, NBC. 



YOUNG WIDDER DROWN When Dr. 
Anthony Loring's long-estranged wife, 
Ruth, first appeared in Simpsonville. An- 
thony desperately tried to establish proof 
of his contention that their marriage had 
been annulled many years ago. But Ruth's 
mental and emotional state appears so 
pitiable that both Anthony and Ellen 
Brown, his fiancee, are reluctant to pre- 
cipitate a situation that will cause her 
further anguish. Is their sympathy mis- 
placed? M-F, 4:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



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What's New from Coast 



{Continued from page 7) 
telecast also. Winchell, who is under life- 
time contract to ABC, will be heard at his 
old Sunday-night time, which commen- 
tator Drew Pearson has been occupying 
during the columnist's illness. 

Horatio Hornblower is an interesting 
new half-hour dramatic show, heard on 
Monday nights over CBS. It was adapted 
from C. F. Forester's famous books of the 
same name, and transcribed in England. 
Michael Redgrave, distinguished English 
actor, stars in the title role and is sup- 
ported by an all-British cast. 

Fans of the successful Dragnet show 
will be happy to learn it has been renewed 
for the 1952-53 season. The award-winning 
police action-drama will continue over 
NBC, both on television and radio, with 
Jack Webb, of course, as star and director. 

This 'n' That: 

Have you caught the Du Mont television 
show, Midway, which is seen Wednes- 
day nights? This show originates from the 
Palisades Amusement Park on the New 
Jersey cliffs, overlooking the Hudson 
River, and is the first regularly scheduled 
"on location" program to be telecast on a 
coast-to-coast hookup. It's interesting that 
'way back in 1905, Palisades Amusement 
Park was the very spot picked to shoot 
some of the earliest movies ever made. 
Pearl White filmed "The Perils of Pauline" 
serials there, and such silent stars as 
Harold Lloyd, the Farnums, and Mack 
Sennett made their first films at the park. 

Louise Froiland, producer-director of 
the Vaughn Monroe radio show, and Gene 
Hammett, Monroe's musical director and 
chief arranger, are now Mr. and Mrs. 
Their romance began when they worked 
together on this program. Vaughn is throw- 
ing a big party for the pair when the show 
goes back on the air in a couple of weeks. 
Louise, incidentally, is one of the few girl 
producers in radio, and she started on the 
Monroe show as a production assistant 
six years ago. 

Did you ever hear of "The Bedside Net- 
work"? Probably not, but it's a cinch the 
boys in the Veterans' Hospitals around 
New York City have. It was created by the 
Veterans Hospital Radio Guild, a group of 
more than 200 volunteers from all branches 
of radio, who visit hospitals each week to 
encourage and teach patients to write, act, 
sing and produce their own radio show. 
The Guild, which was founded by singer 
Jean Tighe in 1948, has gone quietly along 
doing a marvelous job, without the bene- 
fit of fanfare or publicity. Such well- 
known air personalities as Patsy Camp- 
bell, Bud Collyer, Dwight Weist, Betty 
Wragge, John Gambling, Howard Claney, 
and many, many others are actively in- 
volved in the Guild and devote a certain 
amount of their time each week to the 
venture. The troupers visit one ward after 
another, armed with tape recorders, micro- 
phones, scripts and sheet music, paying 
particular attention to orthopedic and 
paraplegic wards where men are bed- 
ridden. After the veterans rehearse a 
program, their acts are taped on a recorder 
and later played back via "The Bedside 
Network," through the hospitals' inter- 
communication systems. 

Patsy Campbell, who is one of the most 
active and enthusiastic members, says, 
"Although the Veterans Hospital Radio 
Guild started out as a recreation and re- 



habilitation project, we feel that it often 
has a definite therapeutic value. By giving 
these men a new interest in life, and 
developing their self-confidence, they are 
given the will to get better. Some of the 
boys who have improved enough to be 
discharged from hospitals have gone on to 
radio jobs in civilian life, we are proud to 
say. We are working in four hospitals now, 
but we won't be satisfied until we can 
help veterans in every hospital in the 
country. And. we're out to solicit funds so 
that we can speed the organization along." 

Peggy Wood, star of television's Mama, 
has just returned from a flying trip to Nor- 
way, where she had a personal audience 
with King Haakon and personally thanked 
him for the Royal St. Olav medal she re- 
cently received. Peggy was given the 
award because of her fine portrayal of the 
Norwegian-American Mama. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Keane (she's ac- 
tress Betty Winkler) have returned to the 
United States after a long sojourn in 
Europe. George has completely recovered 
from his illness, and he and Betty both 
hope to become active in radio work again. 
Accompanying them home was their baby 
son, born in Rome a year ago. 

The "stand-in" business is picking up 
in television, with more and more shows 
gradually acquiring them. As in the 
movies, a stand-in is used to check camera 
positions, for make-up tests, lighting re- 
hearsals, etc., in order to save the valuable 
time of high-priced stars. Dinah Shore 
uses Frances Shore (no relation) , the same 
girl who works with her in her movies; 
Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis use their 
writers, Ed Simmons and Norman Lear, 
who set up a scene so the "mad" boys can 
get an idea of how it will look on camera. 
Donald O'Connor's dance director, Hal 
Belfer, substitutes for him so he can get 
a lens -view of his numbers. Dragnet 
star Jack Webb has George Sawaya as his 
stand-in while he is rehearsing the rest 
of the show, and Sawaya also doubles as 
an assistant director in addition to play- 
ing bit roles. And even Kate Smith has a 
stand-in! 

Another television romance recently 
culminated in marriage when Bob Hamil- 
ton and Gloria Stevens said their "I do's" 
at New York's City Hall. Cupid tagged this 
pair on The Show of Shows, where they 
danced weekly as part of The Hamilton 
Trio. Gloria is the attractive brunette 
member of the threesome, and her blonde 
colleague, Pat Horn, stood up for her in 
front of the judge. Gloria will do the same 
for Pat when Pat marries Freddie Rhein- 
strom soon. This romance also started on 
Show of Shows, where Freddie was the 
floor manager of the program until he 
went into the Army. 

Believe it or not, but the thirty-three- 
man staff that works the 5:00 to 10:30 A.M. 
shift on the NBC -TV early morning show, 
Today, daily consumes 6^ gallons of 
coffee, 1V2 gallons of cream, 3V 2 pounds 
of sugar, and one tea ball. Dave Garroway 
is the lone tea drinker. 

Florenz Ames, who plays Inspector 
Queen, on the Ellery Queen show, has 
also been appearing on Broadway in the 
musical revival "Of Thee I Sing." He's the 
only member of the cast who wars in the 
original production back in 1931. 

When the American Medical Association 
telecast an actual surgical operation to the 
public during their convention a few 
weeks ago, Bob Hope came up with a won- 



to Coast 



derful crack. "Imagine having your ap- 
pendix out and seeing it a year later on 
kinescope!" quipped Robert. Leave it to 
Hope! 

What Ever Happened To • . . ? 

Bill Perry, who used to sing on the 
Saturday Night Serenade a few years 
ago? Perry seems to have dropped from 
sight, and investigation as to his where- 
abouts and activity has discovered nothing. 
Bill, if you're around, drop us a line so 
we can tell your old fans what's happened 
to you. 

Henry Gerrard, who was the first Henry 
Aldrich on the television version of that 
show? Henry was replaced by Kenneth 
Nelson before the program went off the 
air, and at the present time he is working 
in summer stock. There is a possibility that 
both the video and radio Henry Aldrich 
shows will be back on the air later this 
fall, with a new producer and director, and 
maybe an all-new cast. 

Lucille Wall, who starred for so long 
in Portia Faces Life? Lucille is very 
much with us, appearing as Belle on 
Lorenzo Jones, and doing lots of free- 
lance dramatic work on many shows. 
Lucille says she thinks the confusion as to 
"what happened to her" when Portia 
left the air was due to the fact she hadn't 
had billing on the Lorenzo show up to 
that time, because of her contract with the 
Portia sponsor. 

Lanny Ross, whose musical program was 
heard over Mutual last season? Lots of 
letters on Lanny, who is also very much 
around, though not currently on the air. 
Lanny is now touring the strawhat cir- 
cuit, singing the leading role of Johnnie 
Nolan in the show, "A Tree Grows in 
Brooklyn." He plans to return to radio in 
the fall. 

Clarence Hartzell, who appeared promi- 
nently for many years on the old, popu- 
lar Vic and Sade program? Recently Hart- 
zell has been doing his Uncle Fletcher 
characterization with Don McNeill on the 
Breakfast Club show. 

William Gargan, who was Martin Kane, 
Private Eye, on television? This is a case 
of listener confusion due to a cast change. 
Lee Tracy took over as Kane a while 
back, and Gargan started his radio show, 
Barrie Craig, Confidential Investigator, 
on Tuesday over NBC. Gargan is not ap- 
pearing regularly on television at the 
present time. By the way, did you know 
that Bill, before his grease-paint days, was 
a private detective in real life? 

Jean Rouverol, who used to play the 
role of Betty on One Man's Family? 
Jean recently moved away from the Los 
Angeles area, and therefore had to give 
up her part, as the show originates in 
Hollywood. Virginia Gregg replaced Jean 
as the new Betty on the program. 

These are personalities readers have in- 
quired about. If you have wondered 
what happened to one of your favorite 
people on radio or television, drop me a 
line — Jill Warren, Radio-TV Mirror Maga- 
zine, 205 E. 42nd Street, New York City, 
17, New York, and I'll do my best to find 
out for you and put the information in 
the column. Sorry, no personal answers. 

(NOTE: On all shows, both radio and 
television, be sure to check your local 
papers for time, station and channel.) 




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D.C. Cowboy 



26 




If wishing can moke if so, these youthful fans peering so longingly into 
Pick Temple's wishing well are going to be real cowboys when they grow up. 



Ringing folk songs with a trained 
voice is "like putting molasses on 
mashed potatoes," according to 
Pick Temple — who never took a lesson 
in his life, but does right well for 
himself on Station WTOP-TV in the 
nation's capital. He has a little more 
guitar education — went to a teacher 
once, but gave her up when she 
told him he had "the most atrocious 
fingering" she'd ever seen. Actually, 
Lafayette Parker Temple II is doing 
what comes naturally, because he 
didn't want to waste the money he'd 
spent on a $6.75 guitar. His parents 
wanted Pick to become a violinist, 
or when that failed, even a pianist, but 
destiny stepped in and made a folk 
singer out of Temple. 

Pick's radio career dates back to 
a show on WFRB, Baltimore, when he 
played with a banjo player named 
"Red" Godfrey. His first TV break 
came when he won WTTG talent 
contests four times. As a result, 
WMAR-TV in Baltimore signed him 
for a series of shows. In 1948, Pick 
came to WTOP radio, and in 1951, he 
joined the station's TV staff. 

Journeys into the back country 
for genuine folk-song swapping have 
made Pick something of an authority 
on American folk music. He can 
literally sing "for days" without 
repeating a song. He is proud of the 
invitation he received from the 
Library of Congress to record some 
numbers for their large folk-music 
collection. 

The cowboy singer was actually 
born in Washington (January 20, 
1911), but his family moved to 
Baltimore when Pick was two weeks 
old, returning to D.C. in 1938. He 
attended St. Paul School in Baltimore, 
and, briefly, Johns Hopkins, George 
Washington and American 
Universities. The Temples have two 
children, a daughter, Faye, and a 
son, Lafayette Parker Temple III. 
Pick's greatest popularity is with the 
younger set, who would rather do 
without ice cream than miss his 
show. He calls two of them every 
day and sends each a silver dollar — his 
trademark. Pick's fan mail is 
voluminous, mostly requests for 
photographs. And Pick believes in 
signing all the fan photos himself. 
He recalls the time when he received 
a photo from a movie idol as a child, 
with a printed signature. He'll never 
forget his disappointment at not 
getting the star's real signature, and 
each of Pick's fans gets a hand- 
signed picture of their cowboy 
hero— one idol who deserves the 
popularity he has. 



JOAN CRAWFORD, starring in "SUDDEN FEAR" — A Joseph Kaufman Production, an RKO Release. 




JOAN CRAWFORD . 



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ROBERT 

Q. 
LEWIS- 





He's a man of many moods and life in the Lewis office is never, never dull 



i!ii 




8 II 




29 



By GLORIA DULCHIN 

Bob's secretory for the past five years (see left) 



When the CBS personnel department told me I could be 
assigned to Robert Q. Lewis' office, if I wanted to be. ray 
mouth fell open, but no words came out. I could only stare, 
and nod. Ii I wanted to be! Hadn't I always run home from school 
as fast as I could to catch the Lewis disc jockey show on radio? 
Would I want to make a dream come true that I had been dream- 
ing for many months? Would I! 

My whole idea in applying for a job at CBS had been to work 
my way up and become secretary to a radio and TV personality. 
Now I faced one of those wonderful breaks that you read about 
and think cannot possibly be happening to you. 



See Next Pag 



•■r?' 



ROBERT Q. LEWIS — 







With so many glamour girls competing for his 
attention, Bob's "pin-ups" seem strangely out of date: 
Voluminously-clad bathing beauties of about 1910! 




When the personnel man asked Bob that day if he 
would drop by the office to approve the new secretary — 
me — -I thought Bob just might happen to remember our 
previous meeting a few months before. He didn't re- 
member it, or me, at all. It hadn't been a particularly 
memorable occasion for him. One of the girls had 
taken me into his office to meet him after I told her 
what a fan of his I had always been. He had peered at 
me pleasantly through those horn-rimmed glasses he 
always wears, said, "Hi — nice meeting you — I'm rushed 
right now," and walked out. I had been thrilled. I had 
met my idol. He had been bothered, but kind. I have 
since learned that he usually is — kind, I mean — even 
when he is bothered. 

The first thing Bob said to me when I followed him 
back to his office after the second meeting, the one in 
the personnel department, was completely character- 
istic of the Bob Lewis I have come to know. "You 
haven't called me by any name so far," he began, "so 
start right by calling me Bob, or Robert, but don't 
'Mr. Lewis' me. I don't like formality." He doesn't, 
whether he is dealing with big people or little people, 
because he never has to depend upon a formal ap- 
proach to gain respect. He gets that as a matter of 
course, because he works harder than anyone who 
works for him and he puts the job before any other 
consideration. You expect him to expect you to do 
the same. 

That first day on the job, however, I thought every- 
thing was going to be just a breeze. It was fun fixing 



30 




Old playbills "reflect" Bob's 

theatrical interests — but are only 

part of his collecting hobbies. 



CONTEST— "MY FAVORITE SECRETARY' 



up new files (no one had ever provided any for him), 
ordering the supplies for the expanded office, and an- 
swering his telephone calls, many of them from people 
whose names were famous. 

Then he gave me a radio script to type, the first I had 
ever done, although I didn't tell him so. He said he 
wanted four copies, so I selected some thin, strong 
paper for the carbons. When I brought the finished 
job to his desk he practically exploded. "Don't ever 
type a script on that stuff again," he warned me. "Crisp 
paper rattles and makes thunderous sounds in the 
microphone. Listeners will think it's a bomb." I 
apologized meekly, feeling pretty downcast. "Forget 
it," he said then. "You have to make mistakes in order 
to learn." 

This job is going to be a breeze? I thought to my- 
self. A cinch? Oh, Gloria, what you've got to learn! 

I realize now that working with an amateur in show 
business, as I certainly was then, must have been hard 
on my boss. He knows this business inside and out. 
His dad, a lawyer, had acted (Continued on page 74) 



Would you like to be Robert Q. Lewis" secretary for a 
day? Would you like to share in the excitement of actu- 
ally being a part of show business, going behind the scenes 
to see how it works, what the stars are really like? This 
will all be possible for the winner of Radio-TV Mirror 
Magazine's "My Favorite Secretary"' conte.-t. 

Anyone can nominate you. To be nominated have your 
boss, your teacher, or your relatives tell us in fifty words 
or less why you are the best of all possible secretaries. 
Also, send us a snapshot of yourself. The winner will be 
given a trip to New York and an action-packed day as 
Robert Q. Lewis" secretary. 



Mail before September 10 



RADIO-TV MIRROR 

Box 1769, Grand Central Station 

New York, New York 



I nominate as "My Favorite Secretary' 



Because (see attached letter of 50 words or less). 



Lewis is heard on Arthur Godfrey Time, M-F, 10 A.M. EDT. 
for Sonotone, Frigidaire, Chesterfield, Pillsbury, Nabisco, Pep- 
sodent, Rinso, ReaLemon, Toni, on CBS (part simulcast on 
CBS-TV) ; Robert Q."s Waxworks, CBS, M-F, 7 P.M. EDT, Sat.. 
10 P.M.: and The Name's the Same. ABC-TV, Wed., 7:30 P.M. 
EDT, lor Bendix Home Appliances and Swanson's Frozen Foods. 



Her address 
Your name 
Yoir address 
Firm name 



31 



ROBERT Q. LEWIS - 



6aAk 




With so many glamour girls competing for his 
attention, Bob's "pin-ups" seem strangely out of date- 
Voluminously-clad bathing beauties of about 1910! 




When the personnel man asked Bob that day if he 
would drop by the office to approve the new secretary— 
me— I thought Bob just might happen to remember our 
previous meeting a few months before. He didn't re- 
member it, or me, at all. It hadn't been a particularly 
memorable occasion for him. One of the girls had 
taken me into his office to meet him after I told her 
what a fan of his I had always been. He had peered at 
me pleasantly through those hom-rimmed glasses he 
always wears, said, "Hi— nice meeting you — I'm rushed 
right now," and walked out. I had been thrilled. I had 
met my idol. He had been bothered, but kind. I have 
since learned that he usually is — kind, I mean— even 
when he is bothered. 

The first thing Bob said to me when I followed him 
back to his office after the second meeting, the one in 
the personnel department, was completely character- 
istic of the Bob Lewis I have come to know. "You 
haven't called me by any name so far," he began, "so 
start right by calling me Bob, or Robert, but don't 
'Mr. Lewis' me. I don't like formality." He doesn't 
whether he is dealing with big people or little people, 
because he never has to depend upon a formal ap- 
proach to gain respect. He gets that as a matter of 
course, because he works harder than anyone who 
works for him and he puts the job before any other 
consideration. You expect him to expect you to do 
the same. 

That first day on the job, however, I thought every- 
thing was going to be just a breeze. It was fun fixmS 



up new files (no one had ever provided any for him), 
ordering the supplies for the expanded office, and an- 
swering his telephone calls, many of them from people 
whose names were famous. 

Then he gave me a radio script to type, the first I had 
ever done, although I didn't tell him so. He said he 
wanted four copies, so I selected some thin, strong 
paper for the carbons. When I brought the finished 
job to his desk he practically exploded. "Don't ever 
type a script on that stuff again," he warned me. "Crisp 
paper rattles and makes thunderous sounds in the 
microphone. Listeners will think it's a bomb." I 
apologized meekly, feeling pretty downcast. "Forget 
it, he said then. "You have to make mistakes in order 
to learn." 

This job is going to be a breeze? I thought to my- 
self. A cinch? Oh, Gloria, what you've got to leam! 

I realize now that working with an amateur in show 
business, as I certainly was then, must have been hard 
on my boss. He knows this business inside and out. 
His dad, a lawyer, had acted (Continued on page 74) 



Lew,, i s |, c . ar(i on Arthur Godfrey Time, M-F, ID A.M. EDI. 

nolone, Frigidaire, Chesterfield, PiUsbury, Nabisco, Pep 

sodent, RinM>, ReaLemon. Toni. on Cli.s . |...rr simulcast on 
CBS-TV): Kolicri Q.'s Waxworks, CBS, M-F. 7 P.M. Kill. Sal. 
10 I'M-: ami Tin- Name's tli.- .Sanir. VBC-TV, Wed., 7:30 P.M 
BDT, lor Bendii Home Appliances and Swanson's Frozen Foods 



Old playbills "reflect" Bob's 

theatrical interests — but are only 

part of his collecting hobbies. 



CONTEST-"MV FAVORITE SECRETARY" 

Would you like i» he Robert t.l, Lewis' lecreury for a 
day? Would y..u like i„ ihare in the ncitomonl ..( aclo 
ally being a pan q| show business, union behind the iceni 

to nee how it work-, whfll tin- Itan are r.-all. like? II. i 

..ill all I.,- possible I". III. «i .1 Hino.-TV Ml ,. 

Magazine's "My Favorite Secretory 11 contest. 
Anyone pan nominate you. To I..- nominated have vow 

lio»s, your teacher, i.r y relatival tell ... In Hit) ......I 

01 lees why y..u an- the boil "t all |»i Ibli 

Also, send as a snapshot ..I yonrself. The winnej will bi 
given a trip to New York and an aelion-packed da) s 
Rohi-n Q. Lewis' secretary. 



Moil before September 10 



RADIO-TV MIRROR 

Bo. 1769, Grand Central Stot.o 

New Yorli. N.w Yorl. 



"My Favorite Secretary" 



Because (lee attached letter al 50 word, or lets). 



/oyr oddreit 
Firm name 




It was Paul who "discovered" Jo as a singer. But it took more years than 
either would like to remember — -to realize what they'd found in each other. 



H 



OW WONDERFUL CAN MARRIAGE BE? PAUL WESTON AND JO STAFFORD 



32 




Their pet hobbies: Bridge — and the poodles, Cricket and Beau. 




oneymoon 

happiness 





. *-"-r ..• -*v ■»-* - 

^t ... — 







Returning, the newlyweds looked 
bock on o fabulous trip — looked 
forward, even more, toward home. 



Home . . . there's no place like it. . . . 
So agreed honeymooners Jo Staf- 
ford and Paul Weston as, back from 
their exciting European travels, they 
were rediscovering all the wonders of 
their own grey-shingled Cape Cod abode 
atop its own picturesque hill overlooking 
Bel Air. 

"And how about those gladioluses!" 
breathed the bride. 

When they left, the yard was being 
done over and looked like somebody with 
a crew-cut, but now. every flower 
bloomed its special welcome for them. 
And, at that, the gladioluses were run- 
ning a poor second to the Westons' de- 
voted cook, Lillie Mae, and their deliri- 
ously happy pooches, Beau and Cricket 



— who were blooming each in his or her 
own way all over the place. 

Lillie Mae had whipped up some of her 
own brand of strawberry shortcake — "Ah 
figured you wouldn't get any 'over 
there.' " The dogs, just back from the 
canine beauty salon, were all gussied up 
for the occasion' with fresh poodle-dos, 
and Beau, the only piano-playing poodle 
in Local 47 (the Musicians' Union), kept 
racing back and forth to the piano hitting 
a chord out of sheer pleasure — because 
his folks, Mr. and Mrs. Music, were back 
home. 

A mighty magic moment, this. A mo- 
ment almost as misty as that on the deck 
of the S.S. Independence steaming .into 
New York when (Continued on page 96) 



CAN'T DESCRIBE IT— BUT THEY KNOW IT IN THEIR HEARTS 



33 



I NEVER LOST THE 

When we told people we'd won The Big Pay-Off — a trip to Paris, a mink coat — they thought 




My husband Powell — who had to answer the questions — was understandably 
nervous, though emcee Randy Merriman did his best to put us both at ease. 



34 



PA A 

L*U04( 



DREAM 



we were crazy. We were. Crazy with joy! 




By JOAN LOBEL 



No one believed me. Strangers thought we were 
tipsy. I phoned my sister and said, "We were just 
on The Big Pay-Off and won a trip to Paris and a 
mink coat." She hung up. 

We went into restaurants, drugstores and hotels to 
tell anyone who'd listen our good fortune. "Listen to 
the crazy kids," they said. "No show gives away 
anything like that. They're crazy." But I'm here to 
say it's all true— the sensational Paris trip, the expensive 
mink coat and the accessories that ranged from 
lingerie to gowns. 

It all started when I had a miserable head cold. My 
husband Powell and I live in Cleveland, Ohio. We're a 
fairly average couple. We both work, Powell as 
a real estate salesman, and I myself as a personnel 
counselor. We live on a budget, trying to save enough 
money for a home and a family of our own. Our last 
vacation was our honeymoon, three years ago. You 
can probably fill in the other details from there. The 
possibility of owning a mink coat had never crossed 
my mind. The idea of a trip to Europe is something 
else again: There is a dream I've bundled in my head 
since childhood. 

"One of these days I'm going to get on a tramp 
steamer with all my pennies," (Continued on page 80) 



The Big Pay-Off is seen on NBC-TV, Monday through Friday at 
3 P.M. EDT— Sunday, 8 P.M. EDT— for Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. 



The Marquesa Pamela de Connick — the show's representative 
in Paris — took us to Cafe de Colisee, on the Champs-Elysees. 



When we landed in Paris, we stepped out of 
the plane feeling like billionaire celebrities. 




We were all eyes during sight-seeing tours, 
saw everything — from Montmartre to Versailles. 





My camera-fan husband took pictures of me in 
the Tuileries, in front of the statue of Diana. 



35 



Jane's heart — and program— are always open to such public-spirited organizations as the Girl Scouts. 




the SECRET of a good life 



■^^H 



36 




k 1\(Mm CJm, 



Eighteen years ago, a beautiful, gifted young woman 
came perilously close to emotional collapse and the 
end of a career that held the golden promise of fame 
and fortune. In that year, her child was born crippled, 
and she suffered the loss of her husband. The young lady 
was Jane Pickens, whose daily program brings warmth 
and sunshine to so many over NBC radio. 

Until those fateful months, Jane's life had been fantas- 
tically successful: Jane was endowed with loveliness, intel- 
ligence and such great musical talent that, from the age of 
fourteen on, she had won scholarships to the best acad- 
emies here and abroad. Critics and teachers predicted 
a magnificent career — and then her world came crashing 
down around her. 

Nothing in her background had prepared the sweet- 
faced, trusting, talented girl for the blow fate struck. Jane's 
childhood was happy, fruitful and musical. Her father, a 
cotton broker in Georgia, was an (Continued on page 71) 



The Jane Pickens Show is heard M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, NBC network. 



JANE PICKENS' WORLD CRASHED AROUND HER 




EIGHTEEN YEARS AGO. BUT FAITH IN GOD GUIDED HER TO A RICH, FULL LIFE 



37 






Expressive looks and gestures came nat- 
urally to Johnnie, even at age one. 



His mother has always been his pal; 
he visits her often, out in Oregon. 



Western landscapes helped to inspire 
"The Little White Cloud That Cried." 



JOHNNIE RAY'S life story 



PART II 





Success, to Johnnie, has meant extra happiness he's been able to give 

his family. Left, his sister, Elma Hass, and her daughter enfoy a song which he 

recorded. Above, his parents admire the fine farm he bought for them. 



"I FOLLOWED MY HEART AND IT LED ME HOME"— THROUGH JOHNNIE'S 
LONG STRUGGLE TO SING HIS OWN WAY— AND FIND HIS OWN TRUE LOVE 



m &kkz H 




W'hen Johnnie was fifteen, the Rays 
moved to Portland and Johnnie 
made the adjustment from a 
small town to a large town very 
quickly. At Franklin High, which he 
attended, he was popular, had a 
host of friends and was part of almost 
everything that went on in the way 
of entertainment. 

When it came time to make plans 
for the Senior class play, Johnnie was 
appointed chairman in charge of 
seeing to it that all went well. "In 
addition," Johnnie said, laughing, "I 
wrote the script, directed, produced and 
I also — this is the pay-off, the ham 
supreme! — played the leading part!" 

Yet at no time did Johnnie lack 
perspective or humor about himself, 
according to his older sister, Elma 
Ray Hass. 

Elma remembers one classroom 
incident which, when Johnnie described 
it to the family, gave them all a 
hearty laugh. The class had been 
asked to give its reactions to a 
show-off. When it came Johnnie's 
turn to speak, he said: "I do get a little 
miffed at a show-off, but only because 
he's usually doing something that 
I wish J was doing!" The teacher 
frowned upon the levity but the class, 
like Johnnie's family, had a laugh. 

Now, as then, Johnnie has perspective 
and humor about himself. 

"I haven't a great voice," he said. 
"Sincerity in it, and my heart. 
Like Jolson, maybe?" 

And again: "I don't particularly like 
to listen to my own records. I sang 
flat three times," he laughed, "in 'Cry.' " 

Then as now, however, he also 
had his faith in, with God's 
help, his star. 

Thinking back on Johnnie's 
graduation from Franklin High, what 
his sister most clearly remembers 
is, she says, young John in his somber 
cap and gown, along with the 
appropriate facial expression. "I also 
remember what the principal said 
as he presented John with his diploma. 
'Here is a boy,' he said, 'who tells 
me that when (Continued on page 85) 



- He dreams now of o farmhome for Marilyn and himself, "where 
the children Baby and I hope to have will grow up, as I grew up. . . ." 




CITY HOSPITAL 




A boy named Checkers found it was easy to hate 
— but even easier to love — once he knew how ! 



Checkers stood belligerently in front of Dr. Crane and Robert 
Baker in the living room of the Baker home, located on the 
grounds of the State Training School where Baker was assistant 
superintendent. Checkers' freckled twelve-year-old face held fear 
but, over and above that, defiance and hate. Yes,' he'd stolen Dr. 
Crane's pen — yes, he'd destroyed a picture with his knife — and what 
did he care that Baker was going to lose his job because Baker had 
defended him against the head of the institution, who had wanted 
to throw him into solitary for his latest escapade? . . . This had 
been the scene Dr. Crane had witnessed some two nights before. 
Mary, Baker's wife, had tried to tell Baker he should allow Checkers 
to be punished and, now that Checkers had run away, it was 
Mary who kept reminding her husband that she'd "told him so." The 
evening grew late and Dr. Crane started to retire as Mary and her 
husband were still arguing. It must have been a short time 
afterwards that Dr. Crane heard the sounds of crying and muffled, 
running steps as if urgent things were going on below. Dr. Crane 
descended to the living room and the scene that met his eyes 
made his throat suddenly tighten. Mary knelt beside Checkers, 
whose freckled face was covered with tears. "It wasn't until we heard 
the radio in the car we'd stolen that I realized what it meant — I 
didn't want Mr. Baker to get fired over me — honest, I didn't. Then 
Wally and I got in a fight over my returning and he knifed me and 
I bound him up in the back of the car — and, well, Mr. Baker gave me 
a break, so I just had to give him one, too." For an instant, Mary 
looked deep into Checkers' eyes, "You know, Checkers, you and I 
were both wrong. I was fighting with my husband because I 
felt he was giving too much of himself to you. You were fighting him, 
too, because no one had ever given you anything of himself." 
"Yes," interrupted Checkers, "it's funny about us people, isn't it? 
When you're hurt, you sure try to hurt back!" "You're right," 
replied Mary and the tears in her eyes shone as brightly as Checkers'. 
"But," she added softly, "when you're loved, you want to love in 
return." For a moment Checkers hesitated as Mary went on 
treating his leg wound, then slowly, painfully he reached out 
and patted her head. . . . Dr. Crane knew in that moment a human 
life had been saved, not by medicine, but by the miracle of love. 

City Hospital, CBS, Sat., 1:30 P.M. EDT; CBS-TV, alternate Tuesdays, at 9 P.M. 
£DT; for Carter Products. Pictured in their radio roles are: Santos Ortega as Dr. 
Crane; Charlotte Manson as Mary; Joey Walsh as Checkers: Mason Adams as Baker. 




40 




MAN COMES ALONG 

Urts willing and able to pray — everything will be right. This Doris Day believes now 




I was nobody's "Dream Girl" 




Not even my own! Then 
I realized there was only 
one person who could do 
anything about it — -myself 



H 




M, 



Now I'm glad I worked so hard to overcome my "three F's," 
and hope I can help others to wage and win the same battles. 



During the years when you are growing up, you are 
always trying to make yourself into the kind of 
person you know you can be, whether you put this 
thought into words or whether it's just a feeling you 
have, deep down in your heart. Sometimes, of course, 
you get discouraged and start thinking there isn't 
much you can do about yourself, anyhow, so why bother? 
I believe everybody goes through that phase, especially 
in their early teens. I know I did. It wasn't until 
I was about sixteen or seventeen that I really took 
stock of myself, stopped dreaming up excuses for my 
failings, and came to some definite decisions. 

Jan, I said, there seem to be three things that are 
wrong. You can do something about each one of them; 
in fact, you are the only one who can. First: Freckles! 
Every summer you bake in the sun without a hat 
and then you are miserable because you freckle. (I had 
red hair, since darkened to auburn, and the light 
skin that goes with reddish hair.) Second: Fingernails! 
You bite them dreadfully. That's pretty silly for a 
pianist who wants her hands to {Continued on page 98) 




Learning to conquer my failings — 
and improve my assets — prepared me 
for that big chance to appear with 
Arthur Godfrey on his many shows. 



Janette Davis is heard on Arthur Godfrey Time, M-F, 10 A.M., CBS, lor Toni, ReaLemon, Rinso, Pepsodent, Pillsbury. 
Nabisco, Chesterfield, Sonotone, Frigidaire (simulcast, CBS-TV) :' King Arthur Godfrey's Round Table. Sun., 5 P.M., CBS, 
for Holland Furnace; Arthur Godfrey and His Friends, Wed., jj P.M.. CBS-TV, for Chesterfield. Pillsburv, Toni. All EDT. 



44 




the 

GUIDING 
LIGHT 
of LOVE 



So like — yet so unlike — the 
role she plays, Jone Allison 
has found a happiness that 
Meta Roberts has never known 



By DIANE SCOTT 



For close to three years now, Jone Allison has 
been your Meta Roberts on CBS radio's The 
Guiding Light. Recently, Guiding Light added to 
its laurels — and Jone's — by making its debut in tele- 
vision. Jone's debut, too. For, although she did a 
few spots in the early days of video, this is her first 
stellar appearance on what She calls "grown-up TV." 

So believable is Jone in the role of the unfortunate 
Meta, on both radio and television, that fans by the 
dozen ask, "Are Jone and Meta really alike?" 

There are similarities. Meta Roberts is a physi- 
cally beautiful young woman or she wouldn't have 
had the chance of a raindrop in a hot sun of being a 
model in Hollywood. Jone, in a subtle way, is beau- 
tiful, too. Her hair is reddish -brown. She wears it 
in an individual coiffure, which she designed herself. 
Her eyes are dark blue and have that jewelled look. 
Her face is delicately modelled, her complexion 
translucent. She is of medium height and, of course, 
model-slim. 

Meta Roberts is extremely feminine, or she 
wouldn't become as emotionally involved with men 



— and trouble — as she does. Jone, with the excep- 
tion of the fact that she does not become involved 
with either men or trouble, is ditto. She is, indeed, 
just about the most feminine career girl I've met in 
the theatre world and, from Garbo to Debbie Rey- 
nolds, I've met them all. 

The way she dresses, for instance . . . the day we 
lunched at New York's Hotel Gotham, Jone was 
wearing a navy sheer, shirred from the neckline to 
the hemline (and nothing is more quaintly soft than 
shirring) with fragile lace at throat and elbow-length 
sleeves, delicate jewels of jade and gold by way of 
earrings, rings, bracelet. Dainty laces and dainty 
embroideries are Jone's trademarks. She collects 
'em. Loves 'em. Beautiful blouses, too. And jade. 

"I get down on my knees," Jone laughed, "and 
beg my husband to give me jade for my birthdays, 
Christmases, our anniversaries. Have a passion 
for it." 

Like all truly feminine women, Jone, the career 
girl, is home-loving and domestic. She'll tell you: 
"I'm a terrible house-keeper. Rely on a maid, more 



It took a meeting long after "first meeting" 
to make Jone and Jack understand their hearts. 



the 

GUIDING 
LIGHT 
of LOVE 




Femininity is Jone's keynote, both on and off the 

air. In making a truly distinctive home for husband Jack, 

she's turned many a decorating trick — like that 

bedroom lamp above, converted from an old spinning wheel 





A mutual passic 



than I should, in that department." Nevertheless, 
Jone's husband, radio and TV producer Jack Mos- 
man — and her home, which is a duplex apartment 
in New York — come first and foremost in Jone's 
"scheme of things entire." She loves to cook, admits, 
"I am a good cook. One of my specialties is veal 
birds a la Rossini. And one of my prized posses- 
sions is a cookbook supposed to be translated from 
the prize recipes of Napoleon Bonaparte's chef. All 
of them begin," Jone laughed, " 'Go out with bow 
and arrow and kill the stag,' or something. In other 
words, everything from the slaughter of the animal 
to its appearance on the dining table is included. I 
skip the slaughter," Jone laughed again, "and begin 
Operation Casserole, or whatever it may be, at the 
kitchen stove." 

Jone has a passion for interior decorating, too. 
The home of a charming woman invariably, it is 
said, is a frame for her personality. Jone's is. 

"Our living-room walls are the color," Jone said, 
"of the skin of an eggplant. For the tone of the 
draperies and the rug, we went into the inside of 
the eggplant — they are a pale, greeny, strange yel- 
low. One large sofa is the color of the draperies. 
A smaller sofa is red-striped for accent, for gaiety. 
There is a dark green leather chair by the fireplace, 
again from the eggplant. Across one wall is the 
bookcase and record cabinet, which Jack designed. 
It's enormous, it's huge — we have quite a library 



The Guiding Light, sponsored by Procter & Gamble, M-F, 
on CBS at 1:45 P.M. EDT, on CBS-TV at 2:30 P.M. EDT. 




)r sailing started their romance. Now they have their own boat, handle it with skill. 



of records — it's handsome and was made by two 
brothers who buy the wood of old barns and houses 
in process of being torn down so that, while the 
workmanship is new, the wood is aged and beautiful. 

"Our little dining room is done in wood papering, 
the color of weathered pine. Our bedroom is in 
green, with white-painted woodwork and 'features' 
our old, cherry four-poster bed, canopied, with a 
peach muslin spread which is a copy of the spread 
in the bedroom of George Washington's home in 
Mt. Vernon. 

"A mixture of Early American and traditional 
English is the way you'd describe our home,. I think. 



Or, better still, since we did it ourselves without 
benefit of interior decorator, a mixture of us! We 
have some lovely antiques, which should make me," 
Jone added, with a sigh, "a better duster, waxer, 
oiler; in a word, a better housewife than I am." 

In the small amount of leisure time she has, Jone 
"haunts" auction rooms and antique shops. On her 
terrace is a fabulous old table, the top of which 
was, once upon a time, a church window. In the 
bedroom, a spinning wheel, now doing duty as a 
lamp, gives a lovely light. Mounted in a shadow- 
box on the living room wall is a copy, so old its 
cover is tattered, of (Continued on page 88 ) 



Jone loves to combine the old and new: Note the table on their terrace, made from a dismantled 
church window — and the canopied four-poster with a coverlet copied from George Washington's home. 







on tea ai i:io r.m. tui, on i-na-n at z:ou r.ivi. t,ui. 



the 

GUIDING 
LIGHT 
of LOVE 



Femininity is Jone's keynote, both on and off the 

air. In malting a truly distinctive home for husband Jack, 

'.ho's turned many a decorating trick — like that 

bedroom lamp above, converted from on old spinning wheel. 





-'■* 



f 




A mutual passio for sailing started their romance. Now they have their own boot, handle it with skill. 



than I should, in. that department." Nevertheless, 
Jone's husband, radio and TV producer Jack Mos- 
man — and her home, which is a duplex apartment 
in New York — come first and foremost in Jone's 
"scheme of things entire." She loves to cook, admits, 
"I am a good cook. One of my specialties is veal 
birds a' la Rossini. And one of my prized posses- 
sions is a cookbook supposed to be translated from 
the prize recipes of Napoleon Bonaparte's chef. All 
of them begin," Jbne laughed, " 'Go out with bow 
and arrow and kill the stag,' or something. In other 
words, everything from the slaughter of the animal 
to its appearance on the dining table is included. I 
skip the slaughter," Jone laughed again, "and begin 
Operation Casserole, or whatever it may be, at the 
kitchen stove." 

Jone has a passion for interior decorating, too. 
The home of a charming woman invariably, it is 
said, is a frame for her personality. Jone's is. 

"Our living-room walls are the color," Jone said, 
"of the skin of an eggplant. For the tone of the 
draperies and the rug, we went into the inside of 
the eggplant— they are a pale, greeny, strange yel- 
low. One large sofa is the color of the draperies. 
A smaller sofa is red-striped for accent, for gaiety. 
There is a dark green leather chair by the fireplace, 
again from the eggplant.' Across one wall is the 
bookcase and record cabinet, which Jack designed. 
It's enormous, it's huge— we have guite a library 



Hie Guiding Light, sponsored by Procter & Gamble, M-J. 
on CBS at 1:45 P.M. EDT, on CBS-TV at 2:30 P-M. EOT- 



of records — it's handsome and was made by two 

brothers who buy the wood of old barns and houses 
in process of being torn down so that, while the 
workmanship is new, the wood is aged and beautiful. 

"Our little dining room is done in wood papering, 
the color of weathered pine. Our bedroom is in 
green, with white-painted woodwork and 'features' 
our old, cherry four-poster bed, canopied, with a 
peach muslin spread which is a copy of the spread 
in the bedroom of George Washington's home in 
Mt, Vernon. 

"A mixture of Early American and traditional 
English is the way you'd describe our home,. I think. 



Or, better still, since we did it ourselves without 
benefit of interior decorator, a mixture of us! We 
have some lovely antiques, which should make me," 
Jone added, with a sigh, "a better duster, waxer, 
oiler; in a word, a better housewife than I am." 

In the small amount of leisure time she has, Jone 
"haunts" auction rooms and antique shops. On her 
terrace is a fabulous old table, the top of which 
was, once upon a time, a church window. In tin* 
bedroom, a spinning wheel, now doing duty u a 
lamp, gives a lovely light. Mounted in a shadow 
box on the living room wall is a copy, so old its 
cover is tattered, of (Continued on page 88 ) 



Jone loves to combine the old and new: Note the table on their terrace, made from a dismantled 
church window — and the canopied four-poster with a coverlet copied from George Washington's home. 




OUR 
GAL 

SU N D AY 



When you try to solve another woman's problem, expect the worst — hope for the best 



Sunday couldn't help smiling to herself over 
the expression on the faces of pretty little 
Audrey West and Robert Hunter. If those 
two weren't in love, Sunday had never seen ro- 
mance before. As she puttered about her garden, 
Sunday thought about the events of the past few 
months — how tragically they might have ended! 
When Audrey's mother and father, Rosalind and 
Alec West, had first arrived at Fairbrooke and 
became Sunday's neighbors, there had been some- 
thing definitely wrong. Sunday had sensed this 
as she felt the great tension on Alec's part. He 
was in need of some sort of mental and moral 
assistance. Young Audrey seemed to be torn in 
her loyalties between love of her mother and her 
father. 

Then it was that Sunday learned the truth. 
Somewhere along the line, Rosalind, once a beau- 
tiful stage actress, had acquired an intense pos- 
sessiveness which threatened not only to darken 
the lives of her husband and her daughter but 
would ultimately have led to her own destruction 
as well. In ruthless fashion, she had "arranged'' 
the accident in Alec's automobile when she found 
he had turned to other people in his search for the 
love and affection which he obviously wasn't get- 
ting from her. The "accident" caused Rosalind 
to bring Alec to the new hospital which Lord 
Henry Brinthrope, Sunday's husband, had en- 
dowed. Since it was famous for its orthopedic 
and paraplegic services, Rosalind knew that her 
husband would get the best in medical services. 



They were, Sunday thought, as happy 

as two lovers could be who had at last 

come out of the shadows into the sun 



But it was also the hospital which provided still 
another complication in Rosalind's fife, for it was 
here that Audrey met Robert Hunter, who was 
visiting his relatives, the Brinthropes. It wasn't 
too difficult for Sunday to guess what was wrong 
when she heard Rosalind talk. Even more evi- 
dent was the effect on Audrey's personality as her 
mother began putting stumbling blocks in the 
way of the romance. Slowly Audrey's love for 
her mother was turning to hidden hate! Then 
came the day when Sunday broke a rule of be- 
havior which she had once tried to establish — 
never interfere with another's life. However, so 
much was at stake, so much could be done, if she 
could just make Rosalind see the truth. Sunday 
said things which she honestly believed, said the 
things necessary to make Rosalind at last see 
what she was doing in her effort to keep everyone 
clinging to her. 

From that moment on, it was relatively simple 
for Rosalind, once she was able to see that the 
trouble was not in Audrey, not in Alec — but in 
herself. Rosalind, once she understood, became 
capable of infinite understanding toward Audrey, 
infinite love and companionship with Alec. Some- 
times, mused Sunday — watching Robert smile 
down at Audrey — poking your nose in other 
people's business can come to some good! 

Our Gal Sunday, CBS, M-F, 12:45 P.M. EDT, for Anacin. 
Gerrianne Raphael, Richard Newton and Vivian Smolen are 
seen at left in their roles as Audrey, Robert and Sunday. 



51 




The Racket Squad idol 
has what it takes to win 
a woman. Better still, 
he knows how to treasure 
the woman he's won ! 



REED HADLEY 



From blonde Duchess and black Noches (above) to auburn Helen and ten-year- 
old Dale (below), the home vote is unanimous — they think Reed's just great. 




Helen Hadley plays a very ieading role in the lives of her men-folk. She helps Dale with his 
homework— demonstrating on the blackboard— and cues Reed in his lines for next day's rehearsal. 




H 



ero to his family 



Bv BETTY MILLS 



"tt's very baffling." said the tall, dark, handsome young 
man, as he ruffled his hand through his hair. "But 
then, ladies have always baffled me." 

For a moment Reed Hadley looked very much the 
opposite from the assured, non-baffled Captain Braddock 
he portrays on CBS-TV's Racket Squad. In his 
capable hands he held an off-season valentine, all pink, 
ruffly, and terribly feminine. It had just arrived in 
the mail and was signed by ten teenagers who begged Reed 
to show that he had received it by winking on the 
next telecast of Racket Squad! 

The valentine, only one of hundreds of letters Reed 
receives weekly, is typical of his fan mail. He gets 
romantic communications — in all shapes and forms — 
every day by the dozens. Some letters are from 
housewives who do not aspire to meet him, only want 
him to know their deep-felt admiration for him. Other, 
more amorous letters are from younger listeners who 
want to know if he's married — and (Continued on page 102) 



Reed Had lev is seen as Captain Braddock on Racket Squad, over 
CBS-TV, Thursdays at in P.M. EDT, sponsored by Philip Morris. 




Dad's advice is tops, too. If he wants that 
swing made safer, Dale scrambles to fix it. 



53 






Professional family: Jack with five of the Juvenile Jurors — Laura, Billy, Charlie, Mai-Ian, Ronnie. 



Successful Romeo 



JACK BARRY IS IN LOVE WITH YOUNGSTERS, OLDSTERS AND 




Private tete-a-tete: Jack supper-clubbing 
with lovely singing star Marcia Van Dyke. 



A 



IT first sight — and sound — Jack Barry is one "golden 
boy" of radio-TV who really has everything. At thirty- 
four, the sleek-haired emcee is handsome as a matinee 
idol, has the movie studios clamoring for screen tests. His 
personality wins the adulation of bobby-soxers, glamour 
gals and housewives alike. He has two immensely popular 
programs currently on television: Juvenile Jury, on NBC- 
TV, and Life Begins at 80, over Du Mont. As their master- 
mind, he's making upwards of $150,000 a year and has long 
been considered one of the most marriageable men in show 
business. 

For Jack Barry has, indeed, had everything up to now — 
except a wife. Several nights a week, he's been a familiar 
sight at New York's smartest spots, squiring New York's 
top models, cover girls, debutantes and starlets. He's dated 



54 





He studies child psychology, wins serious 
□wards — the governor of New Jersey even 
proclaimed a special "Juvenile Jury Day." 



A BEAUTIFUL GIRL WHO HAS HIS HEART 



ty X (KftW 




Jack has a very gay side, too. Off-duty, 
he spruces up for another glamorous date. 



such- noted beauties as Eva Gabor, Gigi Durston, Betty 
Alexander, Ruth Cosgrove, Lillian Moore, and is currently 
being seen around with the lovely Marcia Van Dyke of 
musical comedy fame, who is known to have his heart. 
Gossip columnists have had him ready to ride the marry - 
go-round a couple of dozen times since his star rose so 
spectacularly a half-dozen years ago. But, each time they 
were about to tie the knot for Jack, he confounded them by 
switching his attentions to another glamour girl. 

"I'm not ready to fall in love yet," he always told them. 
"I'm too busy with a family of my (Continued on page 100) 



Jack Barry emcees Juvenile' Jury, NBC-TV, Wed., 8:30 P.M. EDT. 
Also, Life Begins at 80, Du Mont. Fri., 9 P.M., for Serutan. 





I 



/ith lovely singing star Marcia Van Dyke. 



"l e> 



top models, cover girls, debutantes and starlets. He's dated 



54 




Professional family: Jock with five of the Juvenile Jurors — Laura, Billy, Charlie, Mai-Ion, Ronnie. 



Successful Romeo 



JACK BARRY IS IN LOVE WITH YOUNGSTERS, OLDSTERS AND 

II 





Private tete-a-tete: Jack supper-clubbing 
with lovely singing star Marcia Van Dyke. 



Ft? first sight— and sound— Jack Barry is one "golden 
boy of radio-TV who really has everything. At thirty- 
vTT'i. sleek - haired emcee is handsome as a matinee 
idol, has the movie studios clamoring for screen tests. His 
personality wins the adulation of bobby-soxers, glamour 
gals and housewives alike. He has two immensely popular 
TV gramS currently on television: Juvenile Jury, on NBC- 
' j u L ' fe Begins at 8 °. over Du Mont. As their master- 
mind, he s making upwards of $150,000 a year and has long 
been considered one of the most marriageable men in show 
business. 
For Jack Barry has, indeed, had everything up to now- 
t? f „V ife - Several ni 6 ht s » week, he's been a familiar 
sight at New York's smartest spots, squiring New York* 
top models, cover girls, debutantes and starlets. He's dated 




He studies child psychology, wins serious 
awards — the governor of New Jersey even 
proclaimed a special "Juvenile Jury Day." 



A BEAUTIFUL GIRL WHO HAS HIS HEART 



tyJ^MflW 



such- noted beauties as Eva Gabor, Gigi Durston, Betty 
Alexander, Ruth Cosgrove, Lillian Moore, and is currently 
being seen around with the lovely Marcia Van Dyke oi 
musical comedy fame, who is known to have his heart. 
Gossip columnists have had him ready to ride the marry- 
go-round a couple of dozen times since his star rose so 
spectacularly a half-dozen years ago. But, each time they 
were about to tie the knot for Jack, he confounded them by 
switching his attentions to another glamour girl. 

"I'm not ready to fall in love yet," he always told them. 
"I'm too busy with a family of my (Continued on page 100) 



I«* Barry emcees Juvenile' Jury, NBC-TV, Wed., 8:30 P.M. EDT. 
Also. Life Begins at 80. Du'Mont, Fri., 9 P.M., for Serutan. 






Scandal swirled about Helen's lovely head, jealousy dogged her every step — no matter 
how hard she worked to forget her love for Gil and tried only to be his loyal friend. 



The Romance of Helen Trent 



56 



c 



YNTHIA WAS DETERMINED TO RUIN HELEN'S CHANCES FOR 



HAPPINESS— EVEN AT THE EXPENSE OF HER GOOD REPUTATION 



Pretty, blue-eyed Helen Trent 
bent her blonde head over her 
drawing board and worked 
intently on the sketch of a costume 
for Jeff Brady's latest motion 
picture. She was trying desperately 
hard to finish it before the time 
for production to begin. On 
her sketch-board was the newspaper 
with columnist Daisy Parker's 
latest he about her, printed in black 
bold type. Hard as she was trying 
to concentrate on her work, Helen 
couldn't help but glance at the 
newspaper each time she looked 
up. Finally she took it and stuffed 
it savagely into the wastepaper 
basket. "It isn't fair," she found 
herself saying. "I know why this 
is going on, but it just isn't 
fair." For days now, Daisy Parker 
had been spreading the rumor that 
Heken was a home-breaker and 
a fortune hunter. It seemed to Helen 
that, ever since Cynthia had 
entered her life, trouble had brewed 
and bubbled. Helen couldn't help 
it if she was in love with Gil 
Whitney, the man whom Cynthia 
had tricked into marriage. Both she 
and Gil had supposed each free of 
Entanglements when they had 
met and found a mutual attraction. 
Then Cynthia had re-entered Gil's 
life, claiming him as her husband, 
establishing and finally proving 
her claim — only to have it clearly 
demonstrated that the marriage 
ceremony had been accomplished by 
trickery when Gil was a victim 
of amnesia during the war. Helen 
could understand Cynthia's 
desperate fight to get Gil to return 




Gossip began as Gils estranged wife, Cynthia,- gleefully plotted 
with Hollywood columnist Daisy Parker to blacken Helen's name. 
It grew as others added rumors, for envious reasons of their own. 



See Xext Page] 



Whispering Secrets 



57 



The Romance of Helen Trent— Whispering Secrets 








That accident with Barclay Bailey, for instance! He was seriously 
injured, Helen was badly shaken up — and Gil was the first passing 
motorist to give them aid. The gossip grapevine made much of that. 



to her, but it still wasn't fair that she should 
get together with Daisy Parker and outline a 
vicious gossip campaign designed, not only to 
keep Helen from Gil, but also to wreck Helen's 
career at the Jeff Brady Motion Picture 
Studios. True, Gil was a successful lawyer 
now that he had fought and won several im- 
portant law cases, but did Cynthia really feel 
that spreading gossip would win him back? 



Would this make Gil love her when he had 
already made it clear he had no feeling for 
Cynthia? As Helen's hands completed the 
figure drawing in front of her, she thought 
over all that had happened in the past few 
months. There was the offer of a lucrative 
job with Barclay Bailey, who had fully recov- 
ered from his serious automobile accident — 
the accident in which Helen had escaped in- 




See Next Page 



Recovering, Barclay himself was suspicious of Gil's 
presence at the scene — but still so enamored he tried 
to win Helen by offering her a big job with his studio. 



jury but not gossip about herself. Helen shook 
her head as she remembered the scene with 
Barclay when she had refused his generous 
offer of a job. It wasn't just because she was 
loyal to Jeff Brady — and she certainly was 
that — but it was also because she wanted no 
further. involvements with Barclay, who was 
openly in love with her. In a way, Helen 
thought, she was responsible for alt that was 
going on for Barclay was jealous of Gil and 
he, too, was beginning to believe the concerted 
gossip campaign against her. His parents 
weren't helping much, either, by hashing over 
and adding to every idle scrap of talk that was 
said about her. Helen was certain they believed 
her nothing but a fortune hunter and they, too, 
were using the Daisy Parker columns to ruin 
Helen's reputation. Besides, there was Lydia, 
Jeff Brady's wife. Lydia was jealous of Helen, 
believed the worst — that Jeff's interest in Helen 
was more a personal one than a business inter- 




Though Helen refused the job, Barclay's wealthy 
parents were ready to believe any evil and Cynthia 
gave them final "proof" Helen was a fortune hunter! 



59 



The Romance of Helen Trent— Whispering Secrets 




// 



58 



TJiejRomanc^ 





That accident with Barclay Bailey, for instance! He was seriously 
injured, Helen was badly shaken up— and Gil was the first passing 
motorist to give them aid. The gossip grapevine made much of that. 



i" her, but It still wasn't fail Out she should 

Ihti with Daii ., „ u tline a 

a designed, not only to 

leu from Gil, but ..Is., to wreck Helen's 

' lh <' J«8 B n Picture 

ful lawyer 

now that ha had fougl ,.,,,1 , m _ 

portant law cases, bul .,n y r oe ] 

[oasip would win him back' 



Would this make Gil love her when he had 
already made it clear he had no feeling for 
Cynthia? As Helen's hands completed the 
figure drawing in front of her, she thought 
over all that had happened in the past few 
months. There was the offer of a lucrative 
job with Barclay Bailey, who had fully recov- 
ered from his serious automobile accident— 
the accident in which Helen had escaped in- 



Recovering, Barclay himself was suspicious of Gil's 
presence at the scene — but still so enamored he tried 
to win Helen by offering her o big job with his studio. 



jury but not gossip about herself. Helen shook 
her head as she remembered the scene with 
Barclay when she had refused his generous 
offer of a job. It wasn't just because she was 
loyal to Jeff Brady — and she certainly was 
that — but it was also because she wanted no 
further, involvements with Barclay, who was 
openly in love with her. In a way. Helen 
thought, she was responsible for all that was 
going on for Barclay was jealous of Gil and 
he, too, was beginning to believe the concerted 
gossip campaign against her. His parents 
weren't helping much, either, by hashing 
and adding to every idle scrap of talk that was 
said about her. Helen was certain they believed 
her nothing but a fortune hunter and they, too. 
were using the Daisy Parker columns to ruin 
Helen's reputation. Besides, there was Lydia. 
Jeff Brady's wife. Lydia was jealous of Helen, 
believed the worst — that Jeff's interest in Helen 
was more a personal one than a business 



Srr %r.xl 



!•«„, 



Though Helen refused the job. Borcloy's wealthy 
parents were ready to believe any evil and Cynthia 
gave them final "proof Heler hunter 1 



The Romance of Helen Trent— Whispering Secrets 




And what of Jeff Brady, Helen's boss, whose interest in building her career has always kept tongues wagging? 



60 




Devoted to her boss, Helen feels there are many 
differences between Jeff and his wife — besides the 
latter's jealousy — but Jeff won't even discuss it. 



est. No matter how hard Helen tried — and she tried 
very hard — to patch up things between Lydia and 
Jeff, neither had done anything to mend the feelings 
of the other, and both had been quick to blame Helen 
for interfering. At last, as the natural light from the 
window above her sketch-board faded, Helen put 
down her drawing pencil. It was finished and, if Jeff 
Brady approved, the last of the costumes could be 
completed in the morning. As she stretched her arms 
and began to put her pencils away, she thought about 
the meeting she would soon have with Gil. They 
were going to have dinner to discuss plans for his law 
firm. It would be the one bright spot in her day. She 
knew that all this gossip was having the opposite 
effect from what Cynthia had hoped for — if anything, 
it was drawing Gil closer to Helen and farther away 
from his unloved wife. Where would it all end? Cer- 
tainly she had a right to share Gil's company and 
his plans for his future, although perhaps she could 
never be a part of those plans. Would she ever be free, 
would Gil ever be free of various entanglements 
to allow them to work out their own destiny? As she 
made her way out of her office, Helen wondered. 



Pictured here, as on the air, are: 

Helen Trent Julie Stevens 

Gil Whitney David Gothard 

Cynthia Mary Jane Higby 

Jeff Brady John Stanley 

Daisy Parker Sarali Burton 

Barclay Bailey Tom Collins 

Mrs. Bailey Ethel Remey 

Mr. Bailey John Riggs 

The Romance of Helen Trent, M-F, 12:30 P.M. EDT, CBS; 
sponsored l>y Whitehall Pharmacal Co. and Boyle-Midway, Inc. 




Cynthia's tactics have only driven Gil further from 
her. He's now learned how she tricked him into 
marriage, realizes her rumors about Helen are lies. 




But Cynthia's still determined to wreck Helen's 
career — and to share in the wealth from Gil's. It 
is she who is really the fortune hunter, not Helen. 




Will love be strong enough for Helen and Gil to 
overcome treacherous gossip, fight their way free to 
a happy life together? What lies ahead for them? 



61 



my Astonishing husband 




Two sides of Mel Torme — personal and professional: 

Above, with school friend John Poister and Uncle Art; below, 

drumming for fun with Skitch Henderson at the piano. 




Cameras and queries 

greeted Candy and Mel at 

the license bureau. 

Then a quiet ceremony, a 

heartfelt kiss — and 

a wedding gift which any 

bride would treasure! 



"I had a strange, 

panicky feeling 

that the next few moments 

would decide my future. 

And I was right, 

for they opened the door 

to a glorious future 

as Mrs. Torme." 



b 



n 







OpM^l&wkl 



62 





When Mel and I married, our friends' packages 
of crystal, silver and linen delighted me. Yet 
the present which pleased me most is one 
seldom found in a display of wedding gifts. Mel 
wrote me a song. It's a simple, lilting melody, easy 
to sing, and with the kind of words any boy can say 
to his girl and not feel silly saying them. Mel calls 
it "There Isn't Any Special Reason." It's our love 
story. Since then, other boys and girls have made it 
doubly precious by singing our song with us. 

There wasn't any special reason, to quote Mel's 
title, why he should fall in love with me at first sight. 
Yet Mel insists he did. 



We met in a New York night club. I had a date. 
Mel didn't. The man I was with introduced him, and 
Mel sat down at our table. I had heard of Mel Torme, 
of course. Everyone in show business had heard of 
Mel Torme, the astonishing young star who confused 
the critics. They no sooner had him labeled a motion 
picture actor than he turned up singing on radio and 
recordings. When, as the Velvet Fog, he had bobby- 
soxers spinning, he wrote {Continued on page 82) 



Mel Torme can be seen and heard on his own program. The Mel 
Torme Show, on CBS-TV. Consult your paper for day and hour. 



63 




i i I 

W E'VE LEARNED A LOT FROM OUR HOBBY— FRIENDLINESS AND A 
GOOD WAY OF LIFE," SAYS THE HEROINE OF THE WOMAN IN MY HOUSE 



64 



TWO HAPPY PEOPLE 



Ak^ {tswkwit 



I J ish! Lish, come quickly," called Les from the top 
terrace. And from the urgent note in his voice I knew some- 
thing was wrong, so I flew up the brick steps leading 
from our vegetable garden. 

When I rounded the corner and spied Les, he called, "Now 
honey, don't get excited — I just killed a snake, a big one!" 

I smiled to myself, because I wasn't excited, but Paw was! 
He detests snakes and spiders. Yet he just hates killing 
anything. 

"I — I don't know if it's a poisonous or a friendly kind of 
snake," explained Les, "he was just so big, I didn't wait 
to ask any questions." 

"Oh, Les, Les," I laughed, "for two old inveterate jungle 
explorers, we're about the softest-hearted pair I know. And 
I've a feeling every living thing on this place knows it, too.' 

It's so true. Since living in our sunny hilltop Valley 
home in Sherman Oaks, California, my husband Les Tremayne 
and I have already made friends with a bushy-tailed squirrel 
who raps on our side door if we forget to put out his daily 
ration of peanuts. And even the big blue jay who lives in 
the same pine tree cocks a disapproving eye if we're 
equally lax in supplying him with a handful of the nuts. 
Animals simply love us! 

There was the gopher who lived somewhere underneath 
the house, but who soon discovered (Continued on page 69) 

Alice Reinheart and Les Tremayne are Virginia and Jeff in The Woman 
in My House, M-F, 4:45 P.M. EDT, on NRC, for Sweetheart Soap. 

Mexico fascinates Les and Alice Tremayne — 
who literally "dig up" everything they can! 

Among the many things the Tremaynes share are memories of trips to such exotic spots as Xochimilco. 

— ZZZF* 





65 



who's who 





\jjyouA CoW^ 



Raised on radio scripts instead of Mother Goose 
tales, Larry Robinson, heard as Brad on The 
Second Mrs. Burton, started his air career at 
the age of three. He gave his first performance on 
the children's program, Coast to Coast On A Bus, 
singing "The Old Farmer" in fluent Danish, taught 
him by his actress mother. Larry was born in New 
York City, where his father was a lawyer. When 
the young star was five, his father died, Mrs. 
Robinson moved Larry and his elder brother to 
Manhattan from their suburban home. Larry began 
to attend Professional Children's School at about 
the same time that he got his first Broadway role 
as Pud in "On Borrowed Time." His performance 
received high praise from the critics, and after the 
play ended its run he was cast as Harlan in that 
longest-run hit, "Life With Father." Even while 
playing on Broadway, Larry continued his radio 
work and, when he made his first appearance as 
Sammy on the radio version of The Goldbergs, he 
had already been cast more than 5,000 times in 
different radio roles. Until a few years ago, Larry 
considered radio and TV parts mere bread-and- 
butter means to the end of attending medical col- 
lege some day, but now he has decided on radio 
and TV as a career. Larry is still unattached, 
seldom dates actresses, they always talk "theatre." 



'(jikKloM^L QpjpkodL 



Gerrianne Raphael started her show-bizing a 
year later than Larry Robinson, but she has 
more than made up for that year she missed. 
Starting her career at the grand old age of four, 
Gerrianne was one of the Let's Pretenders. She 
combined an amazing memory (enabling her to 
act before she could read scripts) with a child's 
sense of whimsy. She, too, went to the Professional 
Children's School in New York, while acquiring 
practical experience on the Broadway stage in 
plays like "Solitaire," when she was nine; "Guest 
in the House," at eleven; and at sixteen in "Good- 
bye My Fancy." Most of Gerrianne's summers 
were spent in the straw-hat circuit, and one vaca- 
tion to Bermuda landed her a job in a night club. 
Her creative ability is not limited to the stage — 
Gerri is an expert cook, and makes all of her own 
clothes. She found this necessary, since she wears 
a size seven dress and finds it very difficult to buy 
appropriate garb for her one-hundred-pound, five- 
foot-four frame. In her present role on Our Gal 
Sunday. Gerrianne portrays a girl of her own age, 
whose family's theatrical background creates a 
heartbreaking problem (see page 51). Gerrianne's 
actual home-life is completely opposite, though. 
Her own parents, a former actress and a pianist, 
have given Gerri much encouragement. 



66 



in Radio -TV 




QaltG^l^ 



Gale Gordon beats the Robinson-Raphael en- 
trance into show business by miles, for he 
made his first stage appearance at the age of 
eight days. The offspring of a great vaudeville 
family (see next column at right), Gale was born 
while his parents were on tour and his proud father 
insisted on introducing his son to the audience. 
Gale always wanted to follow in his parents foot- 
steps and got his first bit part at fifteen dollars a 
week in "The Dancers." Since then he has been on 
the stage, screen and in radio, now devoting all his 
time to the airwaves. Aside from the stage, Gale's 
other great passion is for travel. He spent five years 
in London, fourteen in New York, and for the past 
fifteen years has lived in Hollywood. In 1948. Gale 
joined the U. S. Coast Guard, spending eighteen 
months in the Pacific assigned to LST's. The actor 
is a writer of some merit, too. He has published two 
books and two one-act plays. Painting is another 
of Gale Gordon's hobbies — he sold his first one 
to Bing Crosby's guitarist. Gale's versatility can 
be recognized in two of the many roles he plays. 
On Our Miss Brooks he is the bombastic principal 
of Madison High School, and in Halls of Ivy he is 
the lovable Mr. Merriweather of the college's 
Board of Managers. Gale is married to the former 
Virginia Curley — an actress of course. 




(jy^ijohAw, 



Born in Liverpool, England, Gloria Gordon be- 
gan studying voice at an early age. She made 
her theatrical debut as a mezzo-soprano in Carl 
Rosa opera productions. Switching from the 
more serious side of the entertainment world to 
the light-hearted musical comedy and vaudeville 
brackets, Gloria played the famed Coliseum and 
Hippodrome theatres in London. It was at the Hip- 
podrome that she met an American pantomimist 
and quick-change artist, name of Charles T. Aid- 
rich. She voyaged to Detroit to be his bride. From 
that time on she was an American citizen, and 
mighty proud of it. Gloria gave up the stage for 
several years to raise her two children. Gale (left 
above) and Jewell. In 1923 she returned to the 
stage in Richard Bennett's "The Dancers." Gale 
appeared in the same show, and it was then that 
mother and son decided to take the same stage 
name. After "Dancers" closed, Bennett organized 
a troupe to tour the country in a skit called "To 
Let." Gloria joined the cast, made her first trip to 
Los Angeles in 1928 — liked it so much she's been 
living there ever since. When she isn't busy playing 
My Friend Irma's landlady, Mrs. O'Reilly, she 
spends leisure hours making household gadgets 
out of tin cans, and distributing them among her 
many friends. Her companion is Nuit, a pet spaniel. 



67 




Bob relaxes with his personal angels in the heaven called "home' — son Randy, wife Gloria and daughter Michelle. 

Bob Poole — Paradise found 




A simple but sure-fire philosophy helps 
him balance a happy home and busy career 



People tell me I'm a real easygoing guy. Well, perhaps 
I am ... I like to think so. And, if that is the case, it's 
not — contrary to common belief — because I'm a 
slow-moving Southerner. 

"Rather, it's because somewhere along the course of 
living I ran across a piece of philosophy that made quite an 
impression: "When you feel like you're at the end of your 
rope, tie a knot in it and hang on!' I don't know, maybe 
I. picked it up in the Navy — which, sure as you're living, 
is full of ropes and knots — or perhaps one of my park-bench 
acquaintances passed it on to me. It might even be that 
some wise man wrote it, and I read it. No matter, it's the 
philosophy, not the source, that's important. 

"And, let me hasten to add, you don't have to wait until 
you're really at the end of your rope (Continued on page 87) 



Two Happy People 

(Continued from page 65) 
the delicacies of my labor-of-love, the 
vegetable garden. The poor, tender baby 
plants didn't stand a chance against the 
invading gopher. The cunning little devil 
seemed to sense we didn't want to hurt 
him. Finally it was a question: My beau- 
tiful radishes and carrots or that greedy 
gopher. 

So one morning Les (I couldn't bear to 
do it), armed with his .22 target pistol, 
patiently waited for the offender to poke 
his head above the ground. Ultimately the 
little fellow peeked out from his hole and 
the two stared at one another. I don't 
know who was the more surprised, Les 
or the gopher. Les fired. But friend gopher 
was faster. He disappeared before the 
report. And, as if to signal his defeat, 
he quickly sealed up the opening of his 
hole and we never saw him again. 

We were delighted! We didn't want to 
kill him, anyhow. 

I imagine this picture I'm painting of Les 
Tremayne and Alice Reinheart, actors, is 
a far cry from what most people suspect. 
When we're performing on NBC's The 
Woman in My House, or other radio 
dramas, we're just what we're supposed 
to be. Actors — we hope. But when we're 
on our own, as like as not we're studying 
life in one shape or another. Usually in 
the form of our favorite hobby, pastime, 
and avocation — archaeology. 

"Archaeology," our friends exclaim, as 
we're proudly showing off our beat-up, 
1500-year-old pots, "how did you get in- 
terested in that?" 

As I always say, if you're interested in 
people, you can't help but be interested 
in archaeology. And who isn't interested 
in people? 

Les and I just love to go on those long, 
hot, dirty field trips where, after endless 
digging in the ground, we uncover some 
bit of life, thousands of years old. 

Last summer, following courses at 
UCLA, we persuaded our professor, Dr. 
George Brainerd, to let us join an ex- 
pedition at work in the Mojave Desert. 
From his hesitancy, Les and I gathered 
he thought we couldn't "take it." But at 
last he said yes, and we happily packed 
our sleeping bags, took some old "dig- 
ging" clothes and set off as excitedly as 
most people on their first visit to Paris. 

We joined the rest of the class, now 
living in tents with dirt floors, no sign 
of a shade tree and hardly any water. 
Although the desert was hot, their recep- 
tion was pretty cool, because, as we later 
learned, they thought: Here come those 
actors, undoubtedly stuffy people. 

But when we changed into our "work 
clothes," we looked just as seedy as they 
did and this heartened them a bit. Soon 
we were all the best of friends because 
we shared the common cause of digging to 
uncover 5000-year-old dwellings. We 
"proved ourselves," driving thirty-three 
miles twice every week for food and. 
drinking water — with no water to bathe in. 

Yet we came home from that two-week 
field trip on Cloud Number Nine. We had 
lived! There is no thrill compared to the 
excitement of uncovering old traces of 
life. Perhaps you have to have tried it 
to really appreciate it. But it kind of gets 
into your blood like other hobbies you 
can't break — and don't want to. 

Les and I sometimes think we only 
"exist" between trips to Mexico. We don't 
mean to sound disparaging of our full, 
active radio and motion-picture life in 
Hollywood, because we love that, too. But 
it's when we're in the heart of Mexico, 
exploring like Stanley and Livingstone, 




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that we're living life to its fullest. When 
Les has on his beloved Bush jacket from 
Marshall Field's and I'm nattily attired in 
old slacks and a long-sleeved cotton shirt, 
we think we're our most beautiful! At least 
we feel like it, because we're our happiest. 

I made my first brief two weeks' visit 
to Mexico in 1944, before I knew Les. Eut 
I never stopped talking about the wonder 
of the place and my desire to get back 
to see all I had missed that first time. One 
of my first impressions of Les was that 
he shared my enthusiasm for Mexico. He 
had been there in 1940. So, naturally, 
where did we go on our first vacation 
in 1946, following our marriage in '45 — 
Mexico! 

We went again in 1948, 1949, and 1950. 
And we're already dreaming about an 
expedition to Mayapan in 1953. But it is 
1948 which stands out to date, for that 
was our first visit to Yucatan, Mexico's 
famed peninsula, which boasts thick, 
steaming jungles and the remains of the 
great ancient civilization of the Mayas — 
the greatest, incidentally, of our Western 
Hemisphere. 

Les and I are always asked by our 
slightly mystified friends, if we are so 
crazy about old things, how come we 
don't collect antiques. It's as simple as 
this — we like to find old things, not col- 
lect them 

We've had to pay some unusual prices 
in time and energy — not to mention 
honest-to-goodness money — in pursuit of 
amateur archaeology! But we don't regret 
a minute of it. 

In 1949 we took a regular archaeology 
course at Columbia University. This meant 
we had to turn in term papers! Because I 
had more spare time than Les, who was 
working nightly in the stage play, "De- 
tective Story," I took my time doing re- 
search and study for what I thought would 
be a dilly of a report. Les, I knew, was 
working on his paper backstage every 
night. But imagine my surprise when his 
term paper, so good it now rests in the 
New York Museum of the American 
Indian, received an A! I came up with a 
B-plus. 

We have so much pleasure in just learn- 
ing about archaeology that when we do 
come into possession of a rare piece of 
pottery we're unbearable to live with. 
Several Christmases ago, I wanted to get 
an ancient piece for Les. Visiting the 
Carlebach Galleries in New York I not 
only was able to purchase a 2000-year- 
old pot, but ended up by getting myself 
asked to be the Associate Curator of the 
Folk Museum in Sante Fe, New Mexico. 

Mr. Carlebach, who knew all about Les 
and me, arranged my meeting with the 
Curator of the Museum, then visiting in 
New York, for a talk about the position. 
From the shocked expression on the 
gentleman's face, I gathered this was his 
first experience with an actress, much 
less a small blonde actress interested in 
archaeology. He asked me to take the 
job, which I had to refuse because Les and 
I just couldn't give up our acting profes- 
sions for which we'd worked so hard, no 
matter how tempting the offer of life in 
Sante Fe. I haven't abandoned the idea, 
because some day Les and I probably will 
retire to a museum, either as perpetual 
visitors or workers. We both hope it will 
be the latter. 

We've learned a lot about living, through 
our interest in archaeology. Why hurry, 
rush and beat your head against the wall? 
We've come to appreciate things — dead 
or living. That's why we can't bear to 
harm anything. Even the snakes or the 
gophers who eat the vegetable garden. 
As I said, I'm sure they know it, and 
this makes them our friends. To us, that's 
important. 



The Secret of a Good Life 



(Continued from page 36) 
accomplished pianist. Her mother was a 
singer who trained her three daughters to 
sing and harmonize from childhood — the 
Pickens Sisters started early, and Jane was 
a happy and talented member of this trio. 

When Marcella was born, the doctors 
told Jane that her baby would require 
many operations. Then came the loss of 
her husband. Then one blow followed 
another, as she learned that Marcella 
couldn't be helped in weeks or months or 
even a few years. There would have to 
be constant attendance, a change of climate 
in winter and summer, special treatments. 
It would be a long time, an indefinite 
time. 

"Even today, after all these years, I re- 
member that period as the most desperate 
time in my life," Jane says. "The prob- 
lems to be faced and the decisions to be 
made for the baby and myself nearly 
paralyzed me with fear." 

In every sense of the word, Jane's family 
had always been good Christians, respected 
by their neighbors, but, like many people, 
they hadn't gone to church regularly and 
had never taken religion very seriously. 
Jane herself just didn't miss religion until 
everything turned itself inside out. 

"My outlook couldn't have been worse 
then," she remembers. "There were plenty 
of people with advice, some of it good, 
but it didn't work for me. I wanted to 
make my own decision and I turned to 
God as instinctively as a sick child turns 
to his mother." 

Jane's religious experience was so deeply 
felt that out of it she developed a philos- 
ophy rich enough to cope with every need 
of her life. 

"I began to think of faith, hope and 
charity and just what it meant to me and 
everyone I knew, and my life took on new 
meaning," she says. "I found there was 
enough guidance and meaning in religion 
to meet every crisis or doubt we face in 
this modern world. 

"Patience must have been the first thing 
I learned," she adds, "and how can you 
have patience unless you have faith in 
God's working for the good of man? 

"I think it's the time element which de- 
feats most of us," Jane noted. "If we can't 
fix something immediately, we get a sense 
of hopelessness and depression. Without 
faith, no human being can endure gradual 
progress which would otherwise seem 
endless." 

Jane's goal was to get Marcy as physi- 
cally fit as possible and, along with this, 
she wanted Marcy to develop indepen- 
dence: "No human being has dignity 
without it." And, step by step, Marcy— 
as Jane calls her daughter — is developing 
independence of her own. Marcy, now 
eighteen, has never walked. But she is a 
model young woman, lovely, intelligent 
and diligent. She is a fine artist and twice 
has won awards in the Chicago Tribune 
contests for fashion designs. Marcy thinks 
for herself and makes her own decisions. 
"Everything besides Marcy was and is 
secondary, but I found my new under- 
standing of religion helpful in many other 
ways," Jane tells you. "Now, suppose 
there's a neighbor who makes your life 
miserable. What do you do about it? Do 
you fight back with name-calling and 
malicious gossip?" 

Jane found herself in a similar situation 
some years ago, when she was singing in a 
Broadway show. It was before she at- 
tained star billing and she shared the stage 
at various times with others in the revue. 
A few of these people teamed up on her. 
They were rude: They purposely used 
coarse, vulgar language in her presence 



and insulted her in the same terms. 

"I felt like " crying many times, and I 
did privately," she recalls. "I wouldn't 
like it any more today, but then I was 
much younger and it was a real shock." 

But Jane's reaction wasn't entirely emo- 
tional. When in trouble, she tries to ana- 
lyze the situation. Whether or not she 
arrives at the right solution, at least she 
understands better what is happening. She 
decided these few people in the show were, 
for some reason, afraid of her — either out 
of jealousy or fear that she could hurt 
them on or off stage. Instead of fighting 
back on their terms, she continued to treat 
them pleasantly. In time, they saw that 
Jane was a friend without a petty bone in 
her system. 

"That goes right back to faith, hope and 
charity," she states. "And there's a quo- 
tation, although the exact words fail me. 
'He drew a circle that shut me out . . . but 
Love and I had the wit to win — we drew 
a circle that took him in.' Don't you think 
that would work in a community as well 
as the theatre?" 

Jane lives alone in a Manhattan apart- 
ment. Marcy must be South during the 
winter for her health and then again dur- 



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ing the summer she goes to the country. 
Jane visits her frequently and, in-between 
times, Marcy comes to New York. 

There is always time for real living in 
Jane's crowded schedule. Every morning 
Jane practices for a full hour. And this 
is an ordeal — painful, tedious work, but 
she never misses. After work, she an- 
swers all the phone calls that have accu- 
mulated. There is no time for lunch and 
her pick-up is merely gelatin and crackers 
before she rushes off to the NBC studio 
to rehearse and broadcast her five-day-a- 
week show. From the broadcast, she goes 
into conference with the producer and 
writers, meets with her manager, stops for 
fittings, pauses for an interview and de- 
votes time and thought to the work of the 
Cerebral Palsy Foundation. She is Na- 
tional Co-Chairman, along with Bob Hope, 
Bing Crosby, Kate Smith and Arthur God- 
frey. Her position is not a mere title, for 
once or twice a week she travels to any 
part of the country to lecture and to or- 
ganize local committees. 

Jane's intense interest in the Cerebral 
Palsy Foundation came about through her 
religious experience. Curiously enough, it 
was the same philosophy which also solved 
a social block. A long time ago she had a 
fear of meeting people. No matter how 
satisfied she was with her appearance, 
when she got to a party, she froze up in- 
side. Shyness? 

"That's what we call it," Jane says, "but 
sometimes it's a matter of being too ab- 
sorbed with ourselves. In a way it's 
selfishness, nasty word that it is." 

Religion taught Jane to project herself, 
interest herself in the welfare and prob- 
lems of others. When she met strangers, 
she began drawing them out. She found 
each person had something different and 
stimulating to offer. Instead of fearing a 
strange gathering, she was excited at the 
idea of meeting new people. This projec- 
tion, when extended, accounts for her 



broader and deeper interest in the Palsy 
Foundation. 

And when Jane gets lonely, for celebri- 
ties are no more immune than anyone else, 
she may listen to music or read a while 
for diversion, but invariably she begins to 
think of something constructive she can 
do for herself and others. 

"I get constant inspiration from the Good 
News Reel letters on my program." she 
says. "It's amazing how one good act is 
like a spark that starts off a chain reaction 
of good events." 

Recently, Jane read a letter from a little 
girl named Margery Jean who was dying 
of cancer. It was a courageous letter that 
the girl had written without the knowledge 
of her parents. She wasn't concerned with 
herself, but she wanted to know why her 
family couldn't get out of their cramped, 
pitiful home and into a decent house. 
Well, another woman heard Jane read the 
letter, a woman whose best friend had just 
died of cancer. She wrote Jane that the 
little girl's letter had given her new hope, 
the will to live. And that wasn't all. 
Margery Jean's own neighbors were so 
moved by the girl's faith that they moved 
her family into a better home. Margery 
Jean got to live there two weeks before she 
died. 

"When you face a problem, even if it's 
an incurable illness, the terror fades 
away," Jane says. "People can't make any- 
thing of their lives when they live in 
fear." 

Just about five years ago Jane was lit- 
erally at the end of her rope. Her bookings 
fell off and for six months she was out of 
work. In the meantime, her bills and 
Marcy 's piled up. 

"I'm a singer but, according to my man- 
ager, no one wanted to hear me sing. What 
could be worse?" 

Instead of wallowing in her own misery, 
Jane practiced more strenuously than 
ever. She came up with fresh ideas, new 
interpretations of songs. She told herself 
things would work out well. And fortu- 
nately, as she puts it herself, she was in- 
troduced to Moe Gale, one of the top 
managers in the country. 

"I was sold on Jane immediately,'' he 
remembers. "God had given her a fine 
mind and a great voice for doing good. I 
saw that her problem was a temporary 
thing, for Jane is the kind of person who 
does things outside herself, in the interest 
of others. A person with that kind of atti- 
tude can't fail." 

Jane's comeback is now show-business 
history. She recovered so quickly that by 
1949 she was offered the starring role in 
"Regina," the famous musical version of 
"The Little Foxes." The part called for 
not only a great singer but a woman who 
could act, as well. 

"There were doubts about my dramatic 
ability," Jane recalls. "I had never before 
attempted such a part on Broadway. But 
I pitched right in. I knew I could do it." 

Well, New York music and drama critics 
are merciless, sparing no one who falters. 
But they were unanimous in acclaiming 
Jane's performance. 

"Meeting a crisis squarely, intelligently 
and calmly is the most difficult but most 
effective way to get along," Jane observes. 
"We all have daily doubts: The baby's cold 
could turn into a fever, the budget won't 
stretch, hubby is upset by his boss, the 
Smiths and Browns will likely ruin your 
party with an argument." Jane smiles and, 
with her hand, just pushes them all aside. 
"Well, if you tell yourself everything's go- R 
ing to work out all right, you can save M 
yourself a lot of grief and misery. And 
many times it's that positive attitude itself 
which makes things better." 



When the Right Man Comes Along 






72 



(Continued jrom 'page 42) 
an important factor in Doris Day's life 
even before she ever met him; the agency 
he heads handled her business and pro- 
fessional affairs even before she came to 
Hollywood. 

When her career started zooming, she 
saw Marty nearly every day — on business. 
Because they were both unhappy and lost 
in the vacuums left by their earlier broken 
marriages, they also sometimes spent a 
social hour or two together, going out to 
dinner or to a show. 

But that they belonged together, for 
always, didn't occur to either of them. At 
least, Doris says, it didn't occur to her. 

Marty was the right man, all right. But, 
before she could know it, be ready for her 
happiness, Doris testifies, she had to find a 
whole new set of values, make some 
drastic changes in her thinking. 

There's a big lurid sign on the highway 
near Warner Brothers' Studio (Warner 
Brothers is across from us, it boasts) which 
urges all passers to "Relax — let Paul do it!" 

"I had to relax," Doris says straightfor- 
wardly, "and let God do it." 

Like most people who have had a deep 
religious experience, Doris is reluctant to 
talk casually about it. Her religious ad- 
viser has told her that she doesn't have to: 
"Just try to be a good person," her mentor 
counselled her, "and your light will shine." 

And it does. 

i eople gravitate toward Doris these days 
as to a welcoming fire on a cold night, 
marvelling at the way she's changed, at 
her contagious happiness when she ex- 
plains that she just "learned to think dif- 
ferently — and to be grateful." Driven, 
worried people find themselves wishing 
that they could learn those lessons, too. 
Just as Doris herself, a driven, worried girl 
only a few short years ago, marvelled 
when she met an old friend who when 
she had last seen him had been sick, un- 
happy, and lost, and now miraculously 
was well and in love with life. 

Only his thinking had changed, he said. 

"I wanted to think that way, too," Doris 
remembers. And, being the open-minded 
sort of girl she is, she began to read about 
and study the religion which had helped 
her friend, and thus found her own solu- 
tion. 

She learned to know what things are 
really important in life — love and gratitude, 
sincerity and simplicity and honesty. And 
she discovered in the process what she 
really wanted in life — marriage to Marty, 
first of all. 

"And v/ith Marty," she says, "came 
everything else" — stability that she need- 
ed, the home that was really a home, a 
family togetherness such as she had never 
known before. 

"Terry (her ten-year-old son) really 
made the decision for us." The boy had 
adored Marty from the first time he saw 
him. "And he needed a man to confide in," 
Doris admits. 

But Marty, long before there was any- 
thing half so personal in his relationship 
with Doris (he was her manager, she was 
his most profitable client), took a fatherly 
interest in Terry, worked out all of his 
little-boy problems on a man-to-man 
basis. 

"I want Marty for my daddy," Terry 
announced after their comradeship was 
cemented. And he would have Marty for 
his daddy, Doris knew right then. It was 
as simple as that. 

There is nothing duty-ish about Marty's 
concord with Terry. He loves doing things 
with the boy. On a recent Saturday Doris, 
unexpectedly excused early from the set, 
got home at noon to find Marty and Terry 



in a flurry of preparation. 

"Oh, boy," yelled Terry, when his moth- 
er came in, "now you can come, too. Marty 
and I are going to my school's play day." 

So Doris whisked into some relaxing 
clothes and off they went to the school. 

A program of races was underway — 
potato races, barrel races, relays. At first 
only the children participated, and then 
some of the adults got in on the fun. A 
little tyke she had never seen before pulled 
at Doris' elbow. "Come on," he said, "you 
can be in the whistle race." 

Doris came on, ran briskly toward the 
judges' stand, where a small blue-jeaned 
afncionado stuffed a handful of crackers 
into her mouth. "Eat," he said, "and then 
whistle. Then start back." 

"I can't whistle," Doris reported, laugh- 
ing, "even without crackers." 

She swallowed t^e dry, salty mouthful, 
puckered her lips — but nothing happened. 
She tried, and tried again. In the mean- 
time, her small opponents were romping 
back down the long field. 

Doris, grimacing and laughing in turn, 
glanced at the sidelines where Marty, his 
stereo camera around his neck, was fran- 
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"His stereo is always around his neck," 
Doris says. "Rather, my stereo. I thought 
he should have a hobby, so I loaned it to 
him. I haven't had a hand on the camera 
since. Nowadays I come home from work 
after having my picture taken all day — 
my hair is up in curlers and my feet are 
killing me — I walk in the door and Marty 
shouts 'Hold it!' And I thought he needed 
a hobby!" 

Doris lost the whistle race, but she 
made a passel of new friends, who in- 
sisted that she participate in all of the 
remaining contests. 

"I had a ball," she beams. 

Everybody was staying for dinner, but 
the Melchers hadn't brought along any 
food. Fortunately, the Kenny Bakers had 
an enormous hamper full of cold chicken 
and potato salad and chocolate cake — 
plenty for three more. 

"Unless," as Marty warned, "my wife 
embarrasses me as usual." 

"I love to eat," Doris admitted cheer- 
fully. After all that running she was 
famished. 

"You can have some of mine, Mom," 
Terry volunteered, amazingly. Terry loves 
to eat, too. But it was a big day with his 
whole family on hand, and he was willing 
to give a little. 

They stayed at the school until almost 
ten o'clock. When it got dark, they turned 
on the lights on the basketball court, piled 
records on the phonograph and had a 
square dance. 

At one point, the little girls were in- 
vited to dance with their daddies, the boys 
with their mommies in a wild version of 
the "Hitchhiker Dance." 

Terry, of course, grabbed Doris, and 
Marty settled down to take pictures. (The 



Melchers hope to have a daughter one day, 
or another son, or maybe even both. But 
for the present Marty was prepared to sit 
this one out.) 

A nine-year-old girl saw him on the 
sidelines and approached cautiously. 

"Mister," she said, "when we have this 
dance my daddy always ducks. I've looked 
everywhere and I just can't find him. 
Would you dance with me?" 

They made a charming couple. 

In the middle of last June, right after 
Doris finished "April in Paris," the three 
Melchers took off in their car for a fishing 
trip to June Lake. 

"I don't like to fish," Doris confesses, "I 
can't kill anything." But her two men 
wanted to go, and she could sit on a sunny 
rock in the middle of a mountain stream 
and look at the sky and just relax. 

"It was the first time in a long time that 
I had had a chance to take a trip any- 
where with Terry." She had been working 
straight through the summers for several 
years. 

"We almost took Terry on our honey- 
moon," she recalls, laughing. 

"Actually we didn't want to go away 
at all. But brides and grooms are sup- 
posed to go on honeymoons, and we 
thought we should conform." 

"Have you ever seen the Grand Can- 
yon?" Marty asked, when the problem 
came up. 

"I can't remember," said Doris, who 
wasn't remembering anything those days 
except her overwhelming happiness. 

Anyhow, they went to the Grand Can- 
yon (spending their wedding night in a 
sweltering hotel room in the heart of the 
lettuce country, El Centro). 

They stood on the rim of the vast crater 
and looked. 

"Well?" asked Marty. 

"Well, it's beautiful," Doris admitted, ad- 
ding quickly, "I wonder how things are at 
home. Let's call Terry." 

So they called Terry, who said every- 
thing was fine but they should hurry home. 
They hurried home. 

Home, although both Marty and Doris 
feel it is the best place to come home to 
they've ever had, and they love every 
brick and board of it, has been in the 
process of redecoration practically since 
they moved into it, and a lot of sitting 
is being done on floors. 

The refurbishing job is taking so long 
only because both Marty and Doris are 
busy working people and have only a few 
hours every week to work with the 
decorator. The final effect "has to be 
perfect." 

"And we're being extravagant!" Doris 
admits. Doris Day, that is, who has been 
zealously economical ever since a glorious 
spending spree the first year she was at 
Warner Brothers ("I just wrote checks," 
she says) . 

"How Marty had to slave to get all 
that straightened out!" 

Marty taught Doris to economize, but 
where their home is concerned he is just 
as much a pushover for the oldest fruit- 
wood table, the finest china, as she is. 

"Everything has to be right," Doris 
glows, "we won't compromise. We pur- 
chase what we can — but wait for the really 
fine things, if we have to." 

Home is important to the Melchers. 
Like the other things Doris has learned 
to know have the only real value in this 
life, Home is spelled with a capital and it 
has to be right. 

Everything important has to be right; 
everything important is right for this 
girl who learned to relax — and let God 
do it — and for her right man, who was 
right there all the time. 



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Robert Q. Lewis — Eligible Bachelor 



(Continued from page 31) 
in college theatricals . himself and I don't 
think he ever did get the theatre out of 
his blood or ever will. As a little boy, Bob 
and his father used to go to a neighbor- 
hood vaudeville house almost every Sat- 
urday afternoon, where they sat right 
smack in the front row and Bob could 
watch the drummer and drink in the beau- 
tiful beat of the old-time vaudeville mu- 
sic. Bob got to know the whole roster of 
big-time and small-time acts — the comics, 
the blues singers, the tap dancers, the dog 
acts, the class dance teams, the jugglers, 
acrobats, aerialists, strong men and magi- 
cians — and the rhythm of the music sang 
in his ears and beat in his blood during 
all the years of growing up. No wonder 
that show business is a part of him now 
and that his knowledge of it is so com- 
plete. 

It's his boast that he was one of the first 
— if not the very first — disc jockeys. At 
seven, his father brought him a little 
microphone device that could be hooked 
up to the loudspeaker of the family radio. 
Bob would play his favorite records and 
give each one an appropriate announce- 
ment from his post in the hallway. It was 
strictly a sustaining program in the inter- 
ests of family fun. But he was probably a 
perfectionist even then, as he is now, al- 
ways trying to better his last performance. 

r art of his dissatisfaction with things as 
they are stems from the fact that he has 
uncannily good judgment of what people 
will like, and he therefore has no patience 
with himself when he thinks he has fallen 
short of that. His ability to judge a new 
song is uncanny, too. He can tell almost 
at once if it will be a commercial success. 
Since I have known Bob, whenever he has 
said a song is good, but not commercially 
good, time has proved him right. 

Life in the Lewis office is never dull and 
hasn't been during my five years there. 
My boss is a man of many moods, and I 
can usually tell which one will prevail 
through the day when I hear his voice 
over the telephone in the morning. If he 
sounds a little tired and impatient, I try 
to postpone some of his minor appoint- 
ments. His schedule is always crowded to 
the minute and I know he will need a 
breathing space somewhere during that 
particular day. But he will never let me 
cancel any appointment that involves a 
promise to help someone, especially any 
young performer he is trying to boost. 

Bob even gave me a break on TV — the 
most frightening experience of my life, I 
can tell you. The script on one of his 
Sunday evening shows called for a skit 
burlesquing an average day in the life of 
Robert Q. Lewis. "Who, better than Gloria, 
could play my secretary?" Bob demanded, 
during a casting conference. Unwillingly, 
I was given the role. All I can remember 
about it very clearly was that the whole 
cast was fitted with horn-rimmed glasses 
just like Bob's. To this day, he has never 
commented on my performance, but I 
think the fact that I am still his secretary 
and not his leading lady speaks for itself. 

As Bob's office secretary I keep strictly 
out of his private life, but naturally it's 
no secret to me that he dates some of the 
loveliest and most glamorous girls in show 
business, being an eminently eligible 
bachelor who is a wonderful host and a 
gay companion. He likes theatre and 
night-club openings, and he loves parties 
at his terrace apartment high up in a mid- 
town New York hotel. Parties for Bob 
mean getting together the people he really 
likes, not just big-name stars or important 
people for the sake of publicity. They, 



too, are among his guests if they happen 
to be his friends, but so are the many 
others — the people he works with on his 
programs, the old friends he knew on his 
way up, the youngsters trying to get es- 
tablished. Bob participates in a party, be- 
sides hosting it. He loves to play some of 
his wonderful collection of old records and 
he joins in the singing without being 
coaxed. Besides a record collection, he has 
old postcards from all over the world, 
totem poles, yellowing playbills, shaving 
mugs, and cuff links. These latter are one 
of his extravagances and he usually comes 
back from a trip with at least one new pair. 

I never have known anyone more de- 
voted to his family. Working with him so 
closely, I have seen how considerate he is 
of his parents, and nothing interferes with 
any date he makes with them. I have 
heard him turn down the most marvelous 
invitations because he would not ask his 
parents to change their plans to have him 
at the family dinner table — for the roast 
beef that his mother knows is his favorite 
dish. Bob has one brother who lives with 
his parents and is an executive of a cloth- 
ing store chain. 

I've learned to say "Yes, Bob," when he 
comes into the office complaining that his 
dog, a mischievous mutt he named Mati- 
nee, just has to go because he has been 
misbehaving again. I know very well this 
is all bluster and that Bob is as soft- 
hearted towards his dog as he is towards 
'most everyone else. 

Actually, I have quit my job about five 
times in five years, but each time Bob has 
given me a chance to cool off and retract 
my resignation. The last time, about a 
year ago, I was quite definite, or so I 
thought. Bob said to me, "Gloria, the next 
time you get angry and feel like quitting, 
you'd better just get up and go home for 
the day, until you feel better about things. 
Otherwise, I might just have to take you 
up on this some time, if only to preserve 
my own dignity." I haven't quit since! 

Last year, when a friend asked me to 
write a little handbook called The Secre- 
tary's Job, Bob was as pleased as I was at 
the request, and even contributed a hu- 
morous foreword, which reads like this 
(the book is now out of print because the 
company did not stay in business, so please 
don't send for your copy!): 

"The writer of this book, Miss Gloria 
Dulchin, is well known to me. She is of 
sound mind, completely honest, and de- 
voted to her work. Unfortunately her 
work is not of much importance to me. 
It is my work in which I am interested. 
Writing this book has taken her mind off 
my work. I, therefore, should like to 
suggest that anyone who reads this book, 
follows all the instructions therein, and 
assimilates all the material, can have a job 
as my secretary starting practically im- 
mediately. Miss Dulchin will be available 
to any publisher as a writer of cook books. 
She makes one heck of a chicken pot pie. 
Robert Q. Lewis." 

As it happens, the job as Bob's secre- 
tary will be open soon and I will be mak- 
ing chicken pot pies instead of stenographic 
pothooks. I already have my engagement 
ring and will be breaking in my successor 
in the office late this fall. (Don't get your 
hopes up — the job is already filled — though, 
as you probably noticed on page 31, you 
can have a chance to see what it's like to 
be Bob's secretary for a day!) 

I'm sure that even now my successor is 
wishing me an early and happy marriage, 
so she can get started being Robert Q. 
Lewis' secretary, one of the most fascinat- 
ing jobs in a completely fascinating busi- 
ness — show business! 



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7:00 
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News of the World 
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Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
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Gabriel Heatter 
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Taylor Grant, News 
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Robert Q.'s Wax- 
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Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 
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Jazz Nocturne 
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Henry J. Taylor 
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Talent Scouts 


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Telephone Hour 
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10:00 
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10:35 


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Frank Edwards 
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Walk a Mile with 

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Rex Allen Show 



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7:00 
7:15 

7:30 
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Richard Harkness 
Echoes from the 

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News of the World 
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Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 

Gabriel Heatter 
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Taylor Grant, News 
Elmer Davis 

Silver Eagle 


Robert Q.'s Wax- 
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Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 
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Scarlet Pimpernel 

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Jimmy Carroll Show 
Dr. Kildare 


Mayor of Times 

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Escape With Me 


People Are Funny 
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9:00 
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Meet Your Match 

Truth or Conse- 
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News, Bill Henry 
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America's Town 
Meeting of the Air 

E. D. Canham News 


Luigi 

Steve Allen Show 
9:35 Pursuit 


10:00 
10:15 
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10:35 


What's My Line? 

Robert Montgomery 
Stan Kenton Concert 


Frank Edward3 
1 Love A Mystery 

Dance Bands 


John Daly, News 
United or Not 


Strawhat Concerts 
Music 



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7:00 
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Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
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Taylor Grant, News 
Elmer Davis 
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Robert Q.'s Wax- 
works 

Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 
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8:30 
8:45 


First Nighter 
Great Gildersleeve 


Music for Half-Hour 
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Postmark U. S. A. 
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Big Town with 

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Dr. Christian 


9:00 
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9:45 


Best of Groucho 
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News, Bill Henry 
Out of the Thunder 
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Mr. President 
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Yours Truly. 

Johnny Dollar 
Steve Allen Show 


10:00 
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Summer Serenade 

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10:35 Portrait of a City 


Frank Edwards 
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Boxing Bouts 

News, Charles Col- 
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6:30 


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7:00 


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Taylor Grant, News 


Robert Q.'s Wax- 


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works 


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8:00 


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FBI in Peace and 


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with Mercedes 
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7:00 
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Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
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Robert Q.'s Wax- 
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Edward R. Murrow 


8:00 
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8:45 


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9:00 
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9:55 News, Win Elliot 


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10:00 
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10:35 


Hy Gardner Calling 
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Portraits in Sports 


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room 



75 



I 



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10:45 


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Pee Wee Reese 


Roseland 

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P.F.C. Eddie Fisher 
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Smiley Whitley 


Una Mae Carlisle 


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6:15 


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6:30 




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Al Heifer, Sports 


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7:15 




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Women in Uniform 


7:05 At the Chase 


7:30 


Case History 


Down You Go 


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Gunsmoke 


7:45 


Friend of Faith 


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8:00 


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Ohio River Jamboree 






Gangbusters 


9:15 








9:25 Win Elliot 


9:30 


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Robert Q's Wax- 


9:45 








works 


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11:35 Invitation to 

Learning 



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76 



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Charis Siesta 


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Latin American 
Music 








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Sammy Kaye 


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Jimmy Carroll Sings 


This Week Around 


Galaxy of Hits 


3:15 


America's Music 




The World 




3:30 


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Bandstand, U. S. A. 


Billy Graham 


Music For You 


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frey's Round Table 


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Whitehall 1212 


True Detective 


Heart Strings 


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Mysteries 




Robert Trout 
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Sgt. Preston of the 

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George E. Sokolsky 
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Salem 
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December Bride 
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8:00 
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Meredith Willson's 

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Stop the Music 


Frank Fontaine Show 

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9:00 
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Summer Show 


Sylvan Levin's 

Opera Concert 
Music 


Drew Pearson 
Masquerade 

Three Suns Trio 


Meet Millie with 
Audrey Totter 

Inner Sanctum with 
Boris Karloff 


10:00 
10:15 
10:30 


Meet the Press 
American Forum 


This Is Free Europe 
Little Symphony 


Paul Harvey 
Gloria Parker 
Bill Tusher in 
Hollywood 


Robert Trout, News 
Syncopation Piece 



* Approx. time — Midwest & Southern areas only. 



TV program highlights 

NEW YORK CITY AND SUBURBS AND NEW HAVEN CHANNEL 6 AUGUST 11— SEPTEMBER 10 



Baseball on Television 



DATE 


TIME 


GAME 


CHANNEL 


Tues., Aug. 12 


8:20 


P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 




8:30 


P.M. 


Giants vs. Dodgers 


9 


Wed., Aug. 13 


1:30 


P.M. 


Giants vs. Dodgers 


9 & 6 




2:25 


P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Thur., Aug. 14 


1:30 


P.M. 


Giants vs. Dodgers 


9 & 6 




2:25 


P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Fri., Aug. 15 


8:20 


P.M. 


Boston vs. Giants 


11 




8:30 


P.M. 


Phila. vs. Dodgers 


9 & 6 


Sat., Aug. 16 


1:20 


P.M. 


Boston vs. Giants 


11 




1:30 


P.M. 


Phila. vs. Dodgers 


9 & 6 


Sun., Aug. 17 


1:50 


P.M. 


* Boston vs. Giants 


11 




2:05 


P.M. 


Phila. vs. Dodgers 


9 & 6 


Tu.es., Aug. 19 


8:25 


P.M. 


Chicago vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Wed., Aug. 20 


2:25 


P.M. 


Chicago vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Thurs., Aug. 21 


2:25 


P.M. 


Chicago vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Fri., Aug. 22 


2:25 


P.M. 


Cleve. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Sat., Aug. 23 


1:55 


P.M. 


Cleve. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Sun., Aug. 24 


2:00 


P.M. 


Detroit vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Mon., Aug. 25 


2:25 


P.M. 


Detroit vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Tues., Aug. 26 


8:20 


P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Wed., Aug. 27 


2:25 


P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Thurs., Aug. 28 


2:25 


P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Sat., Aug. 30 


1:55 


P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 




8:30 


P.M. 


Giants vs. Dodgers 


9 & 6 


Sun., Aug. 31 


2:00 


P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 




2:05 


P.M. 


Giants vs. Dodgers 


9 


Mon., Sept. 1 


1:25 


P.M. 


* Boston vs. Yankees 


11 & 6 


Wed., Sept. 3 


8:20 


P.M. 


Phila. vs. Giants 


11 


Fri., Sept. 5 


1:20 


P.M. 


Phila. vs. Giants 


11 


Sat., Sept. 6 


1:20 


P.M. 


Dodgers vs. Giants 


11 


Sun., Sept. 7 


2:20 


P.M. 


Dodgers vs. Giants 


11 


Tues., Sept. 9 


1:20 


P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Giants 


11 




8:20 


P.M. 


Chicago vs. Dodgers 


9 & 6 


Wed., Sept. 10 


1:20 


P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Giants 


11 




1:30 


P.M. 


Chicago vs. Dodgers 


9 & 6 



Monday through Friday 



7:00 A.M. Today • 4 & 

The personable Mr. Garroway with the video eyeopener of news, 

special events and entertainment. Others: James Fleming, Jack 

Lescoulie. 

10:30 A.M. Arthur Godfrey Time • 2 (M-Th) 

Fifteen minutes of sight into the Godfrey Gang's radio show. 

lO.tr, A.M. Al Pearee Show • 2 & S 

Veteran comic Al pierces morning gloom assisted by pianist 

Edna Fischer, monologist Arlene Harris. Show begins 10:30 

Fridays. 

11:15 A.M. Bride and Groom • 2 

Wedding bells ring out as John Nelson emcees, Phil Hanna sings. 

11:30 A.M. Strike It Rich • 2 & 6 

Worthy contestants try to earn as much as $500 in cash. 

12:00 Noon The Egg and I • 2 

The scrambled events peculiar to love and a chicken farm. 

7 2.-00 Noon ttuth Lyons* 50 Club • 4 & G 

Fun, music and comment with Ruth and her fifty studio guests. 

12:15 P.M. Love of Life • 2 & 6 

Dramatic serial starring Peggy McCay with Paul Potter. 

12:30 P.M. Search for Tomorrow • 2 & 6 

Day by day story of the problems of younger generation. 

12:45 P.M. Kovaes Unlimited • 2 

Forty-five mad minutes with Philadelphia's mad-man. 

1:30 P.M. Garry Moore Show • 2 & 6 

Entertainment and good, clean fun with Garry and his crew. 

2.-30 P.M. Guiding Light • 2 

The popular daytime serial will follow same storyline as radio 

show. 

3:00 P.M. The Big Pay-Off • 4 & 6 

Lingerie and mink and a trip abroad are among the prizes 

awarded to the lucky woman in this quiz show with genial 



Randy Merriman and lovely Bess Myerson. 

3:30 P.M. Johnny Dugan Show • 4 

Stunts and comedy with the handsome tenor and Barbara Logan. 

4:00 P.M. Matinee in New York • 4 & 6 

Bill Goodwin and Robin Chandler co-star with summer variety. 

5:00 P.M. Hawkins Falls, Pop. G200 • 4 

The dramatic story of life in an American small town. 

6:15 P.M. The Early Show • 2 

Full-length Hollywood and London feature films. 

7:00 P.M. Kukla, Fran and Ollie • 4 & 6 

Wonderful whimsey with Burr Tillstrom and lovelv Fran Allison. 

7:30 P.M. Those Two • 4 & 6 (M,W,F) 

Capsule musical comedv starring Pinky Lee and Martha Stewart. 

7:30 P.M. Dinah Shore • 4 (T 9 Th) 

Dinah returns August 26. Until then Liberace, the amazing piano 

virtuoso, offers interpretations of classics and pops. 

7:30 P.M. Broudway TV Theatre • 9 

Legitimate Broadway plays presented in their original form. 

7:45 P.M. News Caravan • 4 & 6 

John Cameron Swayze edits the news with late newsreels. 



Monday P.M. 



0:00 P.M. Quiz Kids • 4 

Pea-size geniuses have a readv answer for quizzical Joe Kelly. 
«:.?0 P.M. Godfrey's Talent Scouts • 2 

"Young professional entertainers bid for a boost to stardom. 
S:30 P.M. Concert Hour • / * 
Thirty-minute recitals by outstanding American singers. 
0:30 P.M. Washday Theatre • 7 
Hollywood films to lighten your Monday night ironing. 
0:00 P.M. My Little Margie • 2 & 
Comedy series co-starring Gale Storm and silent screen star 
Charles Farrell. They play daughter and widower-father. • 
0:00 P.M. Lights Out • I 

Unearthly, haunting tales with Frank Gallop as narrator. 
9:30 P.M. Itobert Montgomery Presents • 4 
The noted actor is producer-host to fine drama series. 
10:00 P.M. Summer Theatre • 2 & 
Top-flight drama while Studio One closes down for the summer. 
August 11. "The Man They Acquitted;*" August 18. '"One in a 
Million;" August 25, "The Good Companions:"* Sept. 1. "Stan, 
the Killer;"" Sept. 8. "The Happy Housewife.'" 



Tuesday 



0:00 P.M. Tomorrow the World • 2 

Andre Baruch emcees Hollywood films. 
0:00 P.M. Midwestern Hayride • 4 

Whoopdeedoo with the Pine Mountain Boys, yodelin' Bonnie 
Lou. guitarist Smoky Duval, Lazv Jim Day and Emcee Bill Thall. 
9:00 P.M. Boss Lady • 4 

Glamorous Lynn Bari as beautiful "boss" of a construction com- 
pany in a new situation-comedy series. Filmed in Hollywood. 
9:30 P.M. Suspense • 2 & 6 
Fictional thrillers and taut documentaries in this series. 
9:30 P.M. Circle Theatre • 4 

Relax in your armchair orchestra seat for excellent drama. 
10:00 P.M. Banger • 2 

One of the best thriller-dillers. Dick Stark is your host. 
10:00 P.M. Original Amateur Hour • 4 & 6 
The show that boasts such cum laude graduates as Frank Sin- 
atra, Vera-Ellen and Robert Merrill with a new crop of hope- 
fuls 

10:30 P.M. Candid Camera • 2 
Allen Funt catches innocent New York citizens off guard. 



Wednesday 



0:00 P.M. Godfrey and His Friends • 2 & 6 

Long-time favorite Frank Parker with romantic ballads, plus 



77 



TVp r °9 ram highlights 



pretty Janette Davis, Haleloke, Marion Marlowe, the Marin- 
ers, Chordettes, Tony Marvin and Archie Bleyer's orchestra. 
8:00 P.M. Adventure Playhouse • S 
Full-length film fare from British and American studios. 
8:00 P.M. Youth Wants to Know • 4 
Teenagers literally and figuratively fire redhot questions at 
prominent congressmen and other public officials. 
8:30 P.M. Juvenile Jury • 4 

Jack Barry emcees as a panel of cute youngsters try to solve 
involved problems of their contemporaries and parents. 
9:00 P.M. Strike It Hieh • 2 & 6 
Host Warren Hull draws out the heartrending stories of needy 
contestants and quizzes them for prizes of up to $500. 
9:00 P.M. Kraft Theatre • 4 

One of video's very first and still superb dramatic theatres. 
9:00 P.M. F.llery Queen • 7 

Exciting adventure starring Lee Bowman as the famous crimin- 
ologist. Florenz Ames portrays his father, Inspector Queen. 
9:30 P.M. The Hunter • 2 

Barry Nelson, Hollywood and Broadway star, as a wealthy young 
American whose business activities involve him in adventure. 



Thursday 



8:00 P.M. Burns & Allen • 2 

The great husband-wife comedy team in half-hour shenanigans 
biweekly: August 14 & 28. Alternating with— 

Al Pearce Show • 2 
Fun-making variety with Al in his famous droll characterizations. 
0:00 P.M. The Best of Groueho • 4 
Reruns of a select group of Mr. Marx's You Bet Your Life. 
0:00 P.M. Bate with Judy • 7 
The indefatigable teenager in hairbrain comedy. 
0:00 P.M. Steve Allen Show • 2 

Variety show stressing comedy and music. Biweekly : Aug. 14 
& 28th. Alternating with — 

Amos *n* Andy 
The uproarious comedy of errors as Kingfish misadventures with 
Amos and Andy. Aug. 21 & Sept. 4. 
0:80 P.M. Chance of a lifetime • 7 
Host Dennis James offers an opportunity for fame and fortune 
to a weekly trio of professional talent-tested entertainers. 
9:00 P.M. Braynet • 4 

Factual, strong crime drama alternating with Gangbusters. 
9:30 P.M. Mister Peepers • 4 

Weekly story of mild-mannered schoolteacher (comedian Wally 
Cox) who becomes befuddled in humorous situations. 
10:30 P.M. I've Got a Secret • 2 
Elfin Garry Moore presides as moderator while a panel of dis- 
tinguished members tries to ferret out the "secret" of contestants. 
10:30 P.M. Foreiyn Intrigue • 4 & 6 at 11:00 P.M. 
Excellent suspense melodrama, filmed in Europe for video. 
10:30 P.M. Author Meets the Critics • 5 
Verbal fisticuffs in discussions of provocative books. 



Friday 



7:30 P.M. Stu Erwin Show • 7 

The humorous aspects of a harried father (Stu Erwin) and his 
wife (June Collyer). Sheila James and Ann Todd as daughters. 
8:00 P.M. Arthur Murray Banciny Party • 2 & 6 

Light variety with song and humor and, naturally dance. Kath- 

ryn Murray, Arthur's wife, as your gracious hostess. 

0:00 P.M. Curtain Call * 1 

Worthington Miner, renowned for his productions in Studio One, 

with a new half-hour dramatic series: Aug. 15, "The Vexations 

of A. J. Wentworth, B. A.,"; Aug. 22, "The Liar;" Aug. 29, "The 

Model Millionaire;" Sept. 5, "The Summer People." 

0:30 P.M. Pantomime Quiz • 2 

Originating in Hollywood, Mike Stokey is emcee, assisted by 

,. blonde Sandra Spence. Opposing teams of entertainment world 

M celebrities compete in a variation of charades. 



0:30 P.M. We, The People • 4 & 6 

Spotlighting the dramatic and entertaining highpoints of the 

political race to the White House. 

0:00 P.M. Boorway to Banyer • 4 & 6 

High-voltage series replacing vacationing Big Story. 

0:00 P.M. Bown You Go • 5 

Popular panel quiz from the windy, windy city. 

9:30 P.M. Our Miss Brooks • 2 

California-born Eve Arden stars as the very human English 

teacher who just can't help getting into a merry mix-up. 

9:30 P.M. Campbell Playhouse • 4 & 6 

Thirty-minute film stories featuring Hollywood actors. 

10:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Stars • 5 

Star-studded vaudeville with host-comedian Larry Storch. 



Saturday 



12:00 Noon Biy Top • 2 & 6 

Great circus variety acts. Jack Sterling as Ringmaster. 

7:30 P.M. Beat the Clock • 2 

Bud Collyer, assisted by glamourlovely Roxanne, challenges 

studio couples to perform stunts for valuable prizes. 

3:00 P.M. Sonys for Sale • 2 

Six amateur songs showcased with top-ranking vocalists. 

8:00 P.M. All Star Summer Revue • 4 & 6 

Full-hour variety show, spotlighting guest stars. 

0:00 P.M. Continental Film Theatre • 2 

0:00 P.M. Blind Bate • 4 & 8 

Six young men vie for blind dates with three beautiful young 

ladies as Arlene Francis charmingly femcees. 

9:30 P.M. Saturday Niyht Bance Party • 4 & 6 

Comedian Jerry Lester, of Open House fame is host. 

10:30 P.M. Assiynment Manhunt • / «&- H 

Ruthless criminals and saboteurs relentlessly tracked down. 



Sunday 



11:45 A.M. Joe BiMayyio's Buyout • 4 

One of the Yanks' greatest stars with big baseball talk. 
4:00 P.M. Fearless Fosdick • 4 

Puppets, based on Al Capp's characters, in comedy adventure. 
5:00 P.M. Super Circus • 7 & 6 at S:30 P.M. 
Spectacular acrobatics and circus acts with Claude Kirchner. 
8:30 P.M. it's News to Me • 2 
John Daly moderator to panel-quiz on current events. 
7:30 P.M. Lucky Clues • 2 & 8 
Basil Rathbone stars in mystery panel show. 
7:30 P.M. Meet the Press • 4 

Well-known political figures are put on the spot by newspaper 
men as decorous Martha Rountree and Lawrence Spivak moder- 
ate. 

8:00 P.M. Toast of the Town • 2 & 8 
Excellent entertainment knows no season as Ed Sullivan's show 
continues through warm weather with four-star acts. 
8:00 P.M. The Biy Pay-Off • 4 
A trip to anywhere in the world. 
8:30 P.M. Mrs. America Contest • 9 
Four beauties vie weekly for the "Mrs. New York" title. 
9:00 P.M. Information Please • 2 & 6 at 8:00 P.M. 
The familiar roster, Fadiman, Kiernan and Adams, signal Amer- 
ica to wake up and stump the experts in this pioneer panel show. 
0:00 P.M. Television Playhouse • 4 & 6 
Sunday's sixty-minute theatre offering fine productions. 
0:30 P.M. Break the Bank • 2 

Bert Parks emcees the famous quiz show that has paid over 
ten thousand dollars apiece to many of the big winners. 
10:00 P.M. Ball of Fame • 4 

Sarah Churchill, the Prime Minister's daughter, is narrator to 
half-hour drama based on famous historical persons. 
10:30 P.M. What's My Line • 2 

Regular panelists Kilgallen, Cerf, Francis and Block take turns 
at vacations as guests help guess your occupation. 
10:30 P.M. American Forum • 4 

Pressing problems of the day debated. Theodore Granik moder- 
ates. 



78 




'Utam 

For a baek-to-school ice breaker — 

□ Try a new romance □ Plan a leap Year dance 

New term . . . new faces; and it's up to you femmes to start the shy 
guys social-whirling. Plan a Leap Year dance, with ample eats; each 
doll inviting a new classmate. And for a quiet riot — feature a cut- 
in, where the gals tag and lead! "Ice breaking" is a matter of 
forgetting about yourself. As you do (at certain times) with Kotex 
— knowing those fiat pressed ends prevent revealing outlines. Fur- 
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Are you in 
the know? 





How should they settle the check ? 

□ One for all Q On the cuff □ Poo/ fhe moo/a 

Spare the waiter needless waiting while you 
buttercups pool your loot! 'Stead of knock- 
ing him out with the slow count, let one 
gal settle for all. Saves confusion. You can 
pay her in advance or when leaving. But 
when buying sanitary protection — there's no 
"one for all" absorbency of Kotex, because 
different gals have different needs. So try 
all 3 absorbencies. Find the one for you. 



If you're a problem blonde, should you — 

□ Brush up □ Brighten up 

Towhead, woehead ! — when shadowy threads 
bedim the gold. Brushing helps undarken 
the roots: draws up excess oil. Also, tinted 
shampoos (wash-outable) brighten topknots 
— safely. You'll always be the fair haired 
gal, if you watch your grooming; guard your 
daintiness. On problem days choose Quest 
deodorant powder, best for napkin use. 
Safe. Unscented. Positively destroys odors. 



Do smart school belles treat teachers — 

□ To lunch □ like people Q With kid gloves 

Oke. You don't aim to be a P.C. (privileged 
character). But you needn't be a B.P. 
(bored plenty) either. In or outside the 
"ivy halls," why not treat your teachers 
like people? Be friendly. Get to know them. 
You'll find they're interesting, helpful . . . 
fun! And don't try the "calendar absentee" 
gag — for Kotex gives softness that holds its 
shape, keeps you really comfortable. 



More women choose KOTEX than all other sanitary napkins 




How to prepare for "certain " days ? 

□ Circle your calendar □ Perk up your wardrobe D *<>Y ° new be,f 



Before "that" time, .be ready! All 3 
answers can help. But to assure extra 
comfort, buy a new Kotex sanitary belt. 
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79 



I Never Lost the Dream 



(Continued from page 35) 
I would tell Powell, "and see Europe." 

"Sure," he answered, smiling tolerantly. 

And that was all. All for him. But I have 
always believed that anything is possible. 
And I never lost my dream. 

It was a January day of this year that 
I stayed home from work with runny 
eyes, a red nose and a box of nose tissue. 
During the day I phoned my sister, the 
one who is a housewife, and she told me 
about a new television show, The Big 
Pay-Off. 

"Guess what the prizes are! A mink 
coat and a trip to Paris for two," she told 
me. 

At three o'clock that afternoon, I tuned 
in the show and my dream got a new 
lease on life. When Powell got home from 
work, I was all excited. 

"You have to write a letter this eve- 
ning," I said, then described the show. 
Randy Merriman asks a husband or boy 
friend four questions. The first three cor- 
rect answers "pay off" in women's clothes 
and accessories. But, for the fourth correct 
answer, it's Paris in mink. "You have to 
write the program and tell why your wife 
deserves these prizes," I added. 

"Ridiculous." 

"Surely you can think of some reason 
why I deserve to be a winner." 

He sighed and said, "Of course, I can 
think of plenty. But it's silly. We wouldn't 
stand a chance in the world of getting 
on the show." 

"Anything is possible," I said, and 
argued and coaxed and coaxed and ar- 
gued, and two weeks later Powell wrote 
the letter. 

The letter described our meeting, which 
was a bit different from the usual boy- 
meets-girl. The boy was a patient in a 
Philadelphia hospital. He had spent four 
nightmarish years in the Army, the last 
two in battle in the South Pacific, where 
the fighting was bad and his buddies were 
killed daily. And he was recovering very 
slowly from his war injuries because he 
lacked spirit. 

The girl was in a group which had come 
to cheer up the patients and, when she 
saw the soldier, she said, "What a solemn- 
looking character you are!" 

Powell later told me it was the first 
remark that had pierced his despair. 
Everyone else had been sympathetic but 
serious. 

Well, the girl came back frequently and 
stopped to see the soldier every time. She 
learned from doctors and nurses that he 
was extremely depressed. This was de- 
laying his recovery. She was sympathetic 
but refused to show it. She would tease 
him, talk general nonsense, sometimes tell 
him about her dates. Then, one day, he 
suddenly came to life and talked for a 
solid hour. When she left that afternoon, 
she kissed him. 

From that day, when Powell began to 
talk freely, his recovery was rapid. In 
fact, he quotes the doctor as saying, "A 
pretty girl sometimes does more for a 
man than all the doctors put together." 
Well, pretty or not, it didn't tell the whole 
story. It was love that actually helped in 
the healing, for that's what Powell and I 
had for each other. That was the incident 
Powell described in his letter to The 
Big Pay-Off. 

"You only saved my life," Powell told 
me, "and if you don't deserve a chance at 
those prizes, no wife does." 
R He mailed the letter on January twenty- 
first, and my hopes were high. I'd been 
preparing for a trip to Europe all my 
life. From childhood, Mother, who was a 
native of Vienna, had entranced me con- 
80 



tinually with stories of the Continent. As 
a youngster, I collected foreign postcards. 
I read travel books by the ton and spent 
three years in college studying French in 
hopes that some day I would get abroad. 
Oh, I was anxious, all right. 

A week later, we received a short reply 
from the office of The Big Pay-Off. They 
asked us to be in their offices on Friday, 
February the first, for an interview, to 
determine whether we would be on the 
show. And Powell was away, visiting his 
father in York, Pennsylvania. 

I lost no time in getting to a telephone 
and placing a long-distance call. 

"Why don't you take a train to New 
York Thursday and I'll leave after work 
and meet you in New York." 

"Well—" 

"But you are only three hours from 
New York now," I said hurriedly. 

Of course, he didn't really have much 
time to think in a three-minute call. And 
he agreed. By coincidence, we both walked 
into a hotel lobby at the same time Thurs- 
day night. 

"I told you it was possible," I said first 
thing. 

"They aren't guaranteeing that we'll be 
on the show." 

"We will," I said confidently. 

The next morning, we were in the outer 
office of the producer with five other 
couples, waiting to be interviewed. And 
we were the last to go in. That was the 
first time we met Randy Merriman, who 
emcees the show with Bess Myerson. Well, 
Randy was amiable and wonderful, im- 
mediately putting us at ease. 

"Let's call each other by our first 
names," he said. He asked us questions 
about the letter Powell had sent, how we 
lived and what we did. Then he told us 
to wait outside a few minutes. We did, 
holding hands, and then he came out and 
said, "You kids are going to be on this 
afternoon." 

We both jumped up. 

"Now try to relax," Randy said, "but 
don't be surprised if you're nervous. Hon- 
estly, I always get a lump in my stomach 
before every show." 

We found ourselves on the streets then, 
just aimlessly walking around, waiting for 
time to report back to the studio. Some- 
one had said there was no sense in going 



MOVING? 

For prompt change of address,' 
please notify us six weeks before- 
hand; otherwise, some issues may 
miss you. Also, some back copies 
may not be available. 

Write to MACFADDEN PUBLI- 
CATIONS, INC., 205 E. 42ND ST., 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 

Send both old and new address, 
and if possible, enclose mailing la- 
bel from a recent copy of your 
Radio-TV Mirror Magazine. 

It's possible to have your mailing 
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new address with the Post Office; 
they will notify us. However, if de- 
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magazine before that notice reaches 
us, it means added expense to you 
because the Post Office will not for- 
ward copies unless you pay extra 
postage. 



to the library to study — there was one' 
chance in a thousand that we would hit 
on the questions that would be on the. 
show. We walked up and down Broadway,; 
our eyes open but seeing nothing. And 
about one o'clock we reported to the' 
studio. 

When the show began, we suddenly dis- 
covered that it wasn't absolutely certain 
we would be on. We were the last of four 
couples and there . was another couple 
carried over from the preceding day. If 
we didn't get on that Friday afternoon, 
we'd be out of luck, for Powell had to be 
back at work Monday morning. 

We sat in the audience while the other 
contestants went before the cameras. And. 
then we got the signal to go into the 
wings of the stage. None of the other 
couples had gotten beyond the second 
question, so they were moving rapidly. I 
still get nervous just thinking about those 
minutes. By then, our brains were posi- 
tively rattling, Powell's especially, for he 
had to answer the questions. 

Powell's knees were figuratively buck- 
ling and then Bess Myerson came by, 
put her arm around his shoulder and gave 
him a little pep talk. 

Then we were separated and I found 
myself being led out to the "wishing 
chair" and there was Powell up in front 
of the cameras with Randy Merriman. 
From then on, I was practically feverish. 

The first question, a musical one, was for 
shoes, lingerie and a dozen pairs of hose. 

"For your Big Pay-Off starter," Randy 
said, "tell me the title of this song." 

They played the music. I knew it well 
but couldn't think of the title, and I 
realized then what they mean by "freez- 
ing up." Then I heard Randy say, "Speak 
up, Powell." 

Powell said, "My Darling, My Darling." 

The audience applauded and a model 
was demonstrating the next prizes: A 
lovely purse, a handmade Chinese cock- 
tail hat, costume jewelry and a party 
dress. 

"Here's the second question," said Randy. 
"The gates of a Hungarian prison opened 
in December of 1951 and four American 
flyers were freed. The Hungarian govern- 
ment invoked a heavy ransom for the re- 
lease of these men. Within ten-thousand 
dollars, what was the amount of money 
paid by the United States Government?" 
(Pause, big pause.) "If you read your 
newspapers, you'll know that one." (And 
how many times had I been irked when 
Powell hid himself behind the evening 
paper?) 

"One - hundred - and - twenty - thousand 
dollars." 

"Right on the nose," Randy called out. 

The audience reaction was deafening 
and right then and there I began to 
tremble all over. I hardly saw the next 
set of prizes — luggage, perfume and a dia- 
mond wrist-watch. My mind was on Paris. 

At that point, Randy pulled out his 
handkerchief and mopped Powell's face 
before he read the next question. 

"President Truman nominated an Amer- 
ican General to be the first United States 
Ambassador to the State of the Vatican 
City on October 20, 1951. Name this 
General." 

"General Mark Clark." 

"Right again." 

There was the uproar again from out 
front. I could feel the excited expectation 
of the audience, for we were now headed 
for the big pay-off. Randy and Bess stood 
on either side of Powell for support. Then 
there was a tense quiet as Randy began. 

"For a mink coat and a trip to Paris," 
he said, "we're looking for the American 



figure who referred to certain members 
of the Senate as 'a little group of willful 
men, representing no opinion but their 
own.' For the big pay-off, name the 
originator of this historic phrase." 

I didn't know and I was thinking hard. 
Truman. Roosevelt. Who? I didn't know. 
I couldn't hear Powell say anything and, 
although my eyes were open, I'm sure I 
lost consciousness. The next thing I knew 
someone was yelling, "You won!" 

I ran across the stage, hurling myself 
into Powell's arms. And the audience was 
shouting and many of them were crying, 
they were so happy. 

"You're delirious," I told him, "but so 
am I." 

It was like midnight on New Year's Eve. 
Even the people who assisted on the show 
were cheering, as thrilled as we were. 
They took pictures and congratulated us 
over and over. And then the show was 
over and we were out on the street all by 
ourselves. 

Even Broadway seemed quiet. It was 
hard regaining our balance. 

"I don't believe it," Powell said. 

"Me neither." 

"We've got to tell someone," he said. 

That's when we called my sister, long 
distance — but, even so, she thought we 
were talking nonsense. It took a second 
call to convince her. And we walked some 
more and I remembered to ask Powell the 
answer to the fourth question. Woodrow 
Wilson. What a man. And then we tried 
to tell some other people and they 
thought we were crazy. We were. Crazy 
with joy. 

Because of a two-week session with flu 
and an operation my mother underwent, 
our trip to Paris was delayed until the 
first week of May. My boss at the Bell 
Vocational Service and Powell's at the 
Marvin Helf Realty Company generously 
gave us time off, even though it was a 
busy period in their businesses. 

1 he day before we were to board the 
Pan-American Clipper, we arrived in 
New York and I received a complete head- 
to-toe treatment from Gerald, the famous 
beauty stylist. Meanwhile, Powell was in 
the producer's office getting details of the 
trip. We would be met at the Paris air- 
port by a gentleman from the American 
Express who would give us our Paris 
itinerary, and we would stay at one of 
the best hotels in the world, Hotel 
Georges V. 

The next afternoon we made a ten- 
second appearance on the Big Pay-Off. 

"Here is a pair of live winners," Randy 
said. "In forty-five minutes, they leave 
for Paris." 

And we were rushed out of the studio, 
with everyone waving goodbye. We felt 
that we were practically in France when 
we stepped in the plane. All the crew 
spoke French. There was French music 
on the speaker system and someone 
handed me an orchid and a bottle of 
perfume. Before we knew it, we were off 
the ground and being served champagne. 

Dinner on the plane was scrumptious, 
served by Maxim's, the famous restaurant 
in Paris. We slept and, the next we knew, 
we were stopping to refuel at picturesque 
Santa Maria in the Azores. 

We landed in Paris at 2: 55 in the after- 
noon and stepped out of the plane feeling 
like billionaire celebrities. A photographer 
was snapping our pictures, a limousine 
pulled up, and we were escorted to our 
hotel. And my first sight of Paris was 
everything I imagined: The magnificent 
boulevards, the women and their poodles, 
the Champs-Elysees. And the noise, such 
noise: Hundreds of little automobiles and 
bicycles scooting about and everyone 
screaming at the top of their lungs. 





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Then a doorman handed us out of the 
limousine and we paraded into the 
hotel. The manager came forward and 
bowed. There was a bellboy for every bag 
and even one for my beautiful mink coat. 
Our room was so large — well, the Clipper 
could have easily landed there. We had a 
balcony overlooking a garden and the 
furnishings were luxurious. 

"Pinch me," Powell said, "it's impos- 
sible. Are we really here?" 

"Can you understand what people are 
saying?" 

"No." 

"Then you're in France, all right." 

To describe everything we did during 
the next eight days would fill a book. 
Every day was just crammed full of ex- 
citement. Food, we soon discovered, is 
considered one of the finer arts in Paris 
and we were sent to the best restaurants. 
We were told the sky is the limit and we 
never did come down to earth. 

When we lunched at the Table du Roi, 
the chef came right over to the table 
and kissed my hand before I even saw 
a menu. Then I learned there was no 
menu. The chef himself decided what you 
would eat. And the woman, I discovered, 
is queen and her husband is at the foot 
of the table. The waiter or chef would 
slice the best portion for me and Powell 
got the leftovers. The only white meat 
Powell ate was what I gave him from my 
plate. 

At the Tour d'Argent, a restaurant in 
existence since 1582, we ate pressed duck- 
number 229,100 — prepared with a recipe 
as old as the building, the same recipe 
used for George Sand, Alexandre Dumas, 
Napoleon III, Edward VII, Princess Eliz- 
abeth and every other notable who stopped 
in Paris. 

We were all eyes during the sight-see- 
ing tours and saw everything. We spent 
two exciting days at Versailles and Fon- 
tainebleau, the most magnificent show- 



places of Europe, once the palaces of kings. 
We saw a room with walls of gold that 
cost fourteen million dollars. We visited 
the abodes of Marie-Antoinette and 
Madame du Barry. So much, and too 
much to tell about. It was breath-taking. 

Paris lives by night and we conformed. 
Our supper took always two and a half 
hours from eight to ten-thirty, and then 
came more fun. We were in the most 
famous theatres and night clubs: The 
Latin Quarter, the Opera, the Bal Tabarin. 
One night, we saw the famous Folies 
Bergere. Powell liked it. 

To everyone we explained how we had 
won the trip. Surprisingly, the French ac- 
cepted our prize as just another indica- 
tion of the wonders of American life. 
Americans who hadn't heard of The Big 
Pay-Off were astounded. 

One night when we got back to our 
hotel, I wanted chewing gum badly. The 
only room open was the bar, and I asked 
the bartender. 

"You could try the drugstore but the 
drugstore is closed," he said. 

"Try Broadway and Forty-Second 
Street," an American called from a table. 

We turned around to face George Raft. 
He asked us to sit at his table, and we 
told him and his friends our story. 

"How about that," he said. "I've got to 
work hard to make this trip and you win 
it." 

When we left at the end of eight days, 
I knew my dream had come true. Paris 
was everything I'd imagined: Exciting, 
romantic, gay, beautiful, enchanting. 

On the plane back, Powell said, "This I 
call The Big Return. We've had an ex- 
perience that I'll remember as long as 
I live." 

And, if I could make a wish come true, 
it would be that everyone who reads this 
wins the same trip on The Big Pay-Off. 
It could happen to you, too. Anything's 
possible. 



My Astonishing Husband 



(Continued from page 63) 
another song, and people spoke of him as 
a composer. Since then, he's entertained 
with great success in night clubs, and 
now — television, where his CBS show 
gives him a chance to reveal a multitude 
of talents. A hard man to classify, my 
Mel Torme. 

We three had a pleasant evening, but 
there wasn't any special reason why I 
should carry the acquaintance further. I 
told him as much when he phoned next 
day to ask for a date. 

I didn't see him again until we both had 
returned to Hollywood, two months later. 

Glimpsed through the milling crowd at 
one of the smartest cocktail parties of the 
year, Mel's rebellious forelock of yellow 
hair, his quick, boyish smile, seemed fa- 
miliar, but I didn't particularly care. It 
was one of those evenings when I felt lost. 
Even my new dress hadn't given me a 
lift. Everyone else was having a wonder- 
ful time, but I was wondering how soon 
I could slip away and go home. I had just 
found an inconspicuous place to set down 
my glass when Mel turned up at my 
elbow. 

"You're Candy," he said. "I met you in 
New York. Can I get you a cocktail?" 

"I'll tell you a secret," I confided. "I 
don't drink." 

"I'll tell you another. I don't either." 

Instantly, there was a bond between us. 
Each knew how the other felt. It was 
silly to be bored to death in the midst 
of a brilliant party, yet we frankly 
acknowledged we were. We edged into a 



corner and sat down to talk. 

As the gaiety and laughter swirled 
around us, we found we had much to say 
to each other. 

We started, I think, by discovering our 
mutual love for Chicago. Mel was born 
there; I had worked there. 

Somewhat surprisingly, I was soon tell- 
ing him things I seldom talked about in 
Hollywood, simple, personal things that 
didn't quite fit the brittle bright pattern 
of conversation in a city where every- 
one is an actor, and sets his scene to de- 
pict the character he wants to be. 

I told Mel, too, about my name prob- 
lems. I was born Florence Tockstein. At 
the College Inn, it became Candy Toxton. 
Now, I had still another name. Now I was 
Susan Perry. 

Mel considered them all, and announced, 
"I like Candy Toxton best." 

As he said it, the syllables became a 
song. "That's like you," he added. "It has 
rhythm, movement. But Candy Toxton 
Torme sounds better." 

I stared at him, unbelieving. Literally, 
this was so sudden. I had seen this young 
man only once before. He had the grace 
to blush. Suddenly, I was flustered, too. 

"Let's go," said Mel abruptly. 

For a moment, I had a strange little 
panicky feeling that the next few minutes 
would decide what would happen during 
the rest of my life. I wasn't ready for a 
big decision. My own career looked bright, 
and I had no room for romance. A mil- 
lion excuses tumbled around in my mind. 

"Please." Mel repeated, "let's go." 



Without a protest, I got my wraps and 
followed him, asking myself as I did so, 
why I was so pliant, what gave this young 
man his sense of power, of sureness. 

I learned, as bit by bit I pieced together 
the Torme story, that the sureness, the 
sense of power, constitute Mel's most out- 
standing characteristic. He sets an ob- 
jective, and it doesn't matter how many 
obstacles are in his way; Mel overcomes 
them and reaches it. 

It has been that way since he was a 
tiny child, I found, as the story unfolded. 
I heard parts of it that night from Mel as 
we stopped at a drive-in for hamburgers, 
and more of it the next evening when I 
went with him to the hot-rod races where 
he had a car entered. I heard it, too, from 
his parents when we spent evenings at 
his home, drinking Cokes and listening to 
his huge collection of records. 

Mel was only four when he got his 
first professional engagement singing with 
the Coon Saunders band at the Black- 
hawk Restaurant. Not much later, during 
the foamy days of Chicago daytime drama, 
he became a radio actor. He had to stand 
on a box to reach the microphone, but he 
read his lines like a veteran. Already, 
young Mel was insisting he didn't want 
to be "good for his age," he just wanted 
to be good. 

He was learning, too, this strangely 
serious small boy, to play drums and to set 
music down on paper. He wrote the first 
of the 250 original melodies which he still 
has packed away in a trunk, and he also 
began making orchestral arrangements of 
the compositions of others. Bands bought 
them, bought them not because they were 
turned out by an appealing boy, but be- 
cause they were good arrangements. Mel 
felt grown up and pleased with himself. 

Mel, in telling it to me, said wryly, "At 
thirteen I thought I was grown up for 



sure. Harry James came to town, looked 
me over, and concluded I was a bargain. 
I was arranger, singer, drummer. He hired 
me, and practically on fire I went back 
to Hyde Park High School to say good- 
bye. I told all my friends and some who 
turned out to be not quite so friendly. 
Oh, it was a great thing, they held fare- 
well parties, and everything. 

"Then James checked with his attor- 
neys," he went on. "In twenty-three of the 
twenty-four states of the proposed tour, 
there were laws which would have re- 
quired the band to carry a tutor for me. 
James said he was sorry, but I'd have to 
wait a while. 

"No one at school believed me. They 
thought I had just made up the part about 
the job, that I had never been hired at 
all. You know the way kids can be. I'd 
come into a drugstore after school and 
they'd all stand up, bow from the waist, 
and yell, 'Here comes Harry James's ex- 
drummer.' There was only one friend who 
stood by me, and that was John Poister. 

"But that wasn't the worst," Mel added. 
"There was a girl, a girl who wasn't im- 
pressed. Call it a school-kid crush if you 
want to, but to me it was serious. I 
mourned and moaned, and finally I packed 
all my grief into a song. I wrote 'Lament 
to Love.' Harry James recorded it, and it 
stayed at the top of the Hit Parade for 
a month." 

Success of his tune restored Mel's pres- 
tige so much that when Mel and John 
Poister wrote a musical comedy and his 
high school staged it, Mel had th